Instigator / Con
Points: 7

Should the Bible be used as a moral compass?

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After 1 vote the winner is ...
Pinkfreud08
Debate details
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Category
Religion
Time for argument
Three days
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Open voting
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Two weeks
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Contender / Pro
Points: 4
Description
The goal of a moral system is to find a system which is logically consistent.
So for example, if my moral system defined intelligence as the valuable trait in humans, by logical extension any being with intelligence is also valuable.
However, consistency isn't the only thing we're looking for we also need a moral system that we agree with where we get consistent outcomes we like.
So back to that example it may be consistent however if intelligence is the trait than by logical extension, mentally challenged people also aren't valuable.
To summarize, a good moral system is consistent and doesn't lead to absurdity both of which the Bible lacks which will be elaborated on by me later.
Rules:
- Keep it civil
- This debate is going to assume that Gods version of morality is subjective and not objective morality
- We're going to be examining the Bibles morality, the Bible does have a place in a modern society in the form of studying for academic purposes. Similar to Hitlers books and killers manifestos.
- We're going to be examining whichever testament Pro deems to be Gods word. The rules for this is only the old and new testament are your choices. PM me whichever testament you're choosing to defend.
- BOP is on Con
Pretty simple debate topic, if I left any rules or definitions you feel I should have clarified I urge you to tell me so that I may clarify.
Round 1
Published:
Greetings I’d like to start off by thanking GuitarSlinger for accepting the debate and I’m happy to debate with you today. 

Anyways this will be the structure I’ll follow throughout this debate for reference. 

R1 - Opening Argument 

R2 - Rebuttal # 1 

R3 - Rebuttal # 2 

R4 - Rebuttal # 3

R5- Closing 

I’d like to advise my opponent to use this argument as well for organizational purposes however they are free to organize their rounds in whatever way they want. 

Now that we’ve gotten this out of the way I’ll now begin my opening argument. 

Table of contents for Round 1 

  • Opening 

  • The Bibles blatant sexism 

  • The Bible endorsing Slavery 

  • Closing 

 Opening 

I’d like to start off the opening by stating that I used to be a Christian when I was younger before I became an atheist in 7th grade. I come in telling people this to clarify that I was very reluctant to abandon my religion however I was ultimately persuaded by a mountain of evidence against the Bible's teachings once I actually sat down and actually did research on the Bible's repulsive nature. 

That being said I do not think the Bible should be censored nor destroyed, the Bible was overall repulsive, should be used to study for academic purposes. However, I simply do not believe this book should be used for the purposes of a moral compass for its blatant sexism and its endorsement of slavery.

Also for voters, I and my opponent have agreed to use the New American Bible, Revised Edition.  Also, my opponent has agreed that both testaments are at play for the debate just to clarify. 

I’ll now begin my cross-examination of the Bible. 

The Bibles blatant sexism

Sexism as defined by Webster

 Definition of sexism
1: prejudice or discrimination based on sex
especially: discrimination against women  

Now that we’ve clarified what sexism means in this context, here are some quotes that demonstrate the Bible’s sexism. 

1 Corinthians 14:34-35:
 
 34 let the women keep silent in the churches: for it is not permitted to them to speak; but let them be in subjection, as also saith the law. 35 And if they would learn anything, let them ask their own husbands at home: for it is shameful for a woman to speak in the church. 
 
  • This is a prime example of sexism since it’s under a prejudice that women are incapable of having a thoughtful opinion based on their sex. 
This is also a false way of thinking, plenty of times throughout history we’ve seen strong and capable women who’ve contributed to society in a meaningful way. 
 
Cleopatra, Elizabeth 1st, Frida Kahlo, Helen Keller, Mother Theresa, Rosa Parks, Oprah, and Elizabeth Blackwell to name a few. 
 
Everywhere we see we can find strong and capable women, the Bible by ignoring women's opinions in the church isn’t making itself stronger, it’s making itself weaker by casting aside half of the population. 
 
This isn’t the only verse that states this, in fact, another verse has a similar sexist quote from the new testament being 1 Timothy 2:12:
 
12 But I permit not a woman to teach, nor to have dominion over a man, but to be in quietness. 
 
  • Yet another example of similar sexism as demonstrated by the Bible. 
 
The fact that the Bible endorses such as the destructive and inhumane way of thinking makes it a bad moral system to fall and not beneficial towards society. 
 
Ignoring half of the population's talents isn’t beneficial to society and treating half of the population poorly is an example of a bigoted moral system and is destructive. 
 
Now that we’ve established that the Bible is sexist, let’s discuss the Bibles endorsement of slavery. 
 
The Bible endorsing Slavery
 
The Bible not only endorses slavery but even gives clear instructions towards slave masters funnily enough and no other verse than Leviticus 25:44-46 NLT
 
 44 And as for thy bondmen, and thy bondmaids, whom thou shalt have; of the nations that are round about you, of them shall ye buy bondmen and bondmaids. 45 Moreover, of the children of the strangers that sojourn among you, of them, shall ye buy, and of their families that are with you, which they have begotten in your land: and they shall be your possession. 46 And ye shall make them an inheritance for your children after you, to hold for a possession; of them shall ye take your bondmen for ever: but over your brethren the children of Israel ye shall not rule, one over another, with rigor.
 
This quote took a while to fully digest it, so here is a summary of this quote as for some this may appear as confusing. So here is an explanation from Salon. 
 
 You may purchase male or female slaves from among the foreigners who live among you. You may also purchase the children of such resident foreigners, including those who have been born in your land. You may treat them as your property, passing them on to your children as a permanent inheritance. You may treat your slaves like this, but the people of Israel, your relatives, must never be treated this way. 
 
This demonstrates two things, 
 
  1. The Bible encourages the purchase and ownership of slaves. 
 
2. The Bible is hypocritical since it states that Israel is free from slavery, yet its neighbors aren’t which is very racist and hypocritical. 
 
The fact that the Bible encourages the inhumane treatment of other human beings based off of a racist dogma is down right repulsive. 
 
This type of bigoted moral system very plainly shouldn’t be used as a moral compass since the inhumane treatment is something me and my opponent will agree as being repulsive and we’ll also agree that racism is also disgusting. 
 
Instead of perhaps keeping the captured enemies as prisoners, or finding a peaceful solution to the issue, the bible instead inhumanely keep them as slaves and then hypocritically orders that Israelians can be slaves. 
 
Just horrible. 
 
Closing
 
I’ve provided numerous examples of the Bibles blatant sexism, it’s hypocritical nature, and it’s repulsive endorsement of slavery. 
 
These ideals are very much harmful to society as they’re inhumane ways of treating other people and are repulsive acts. 
 
Therefore for these reasons, I deem the Bible as a prime example of a poorly constructed moral system due to these destructive ideals. 
 
I will now await my opponent's response. 

- Pink Freud.


Published:

Wow.  Right off the bat you're starting off with a falsehood lol.  I kid, but there is some seriousness to what I say.  Apparently you're not agreeing to use the Bible I requested, but yet you go on to tell everyone we agreed to use the same Bible.    I stated I wanted to use the New American Bible  Revised Edition (NABRE, which you mention in your R1 argument), and I gave you a link to said version ( which could be found at http://www.usccb.org/bible/)
 
Instead you chose to go with another version-- the American Standard Version (ASV).
 
The version (ASV) you chose (and incorrectly state I agreed to use) is significantly different from the Bible I specified (NABRE):  the ASV is missing a significant number of Books compared to the one I requested (NABRE).  THe NABRE has the approval of the Holy See.
 
So, let the record show that PinkFreud (by the way, which one is "Pink"?  ;-)  ) asked that I specify which Bible to use.  I did (NABRE) and He goes on to say we agree to the ASV Version.  The NABRE and ASV differ significantly.
 
If you come to Scripture looking for something to criticize and isolate passages out of context, no doubt you will find something to be outraged about.  One must take into account who wrote it and when.  Alright, so on to the heart of the debate. 
 
Sexism
 
While it’s attractive to pick and choose passages and view those independently of the rest of the Bible in order to promote a narrative, one must always consider context.  One can’t ignore or refuse to acknowledge how high the Bible esteems women and their level of responsibility:
  
   - The Story of Creation – as God creates, there is a certain level of “hierarchy” to his creation.  He first starts the lowest levels (some would say least perfect) and keeps getting “better and better” so to speak.  First the earth, then seas, then the animals, and then ultimately humans.  The 2nd creation story also highlights the next level of creation—the creation of woman.  So all of creation gets progressively advanced all the way up to the very last thing he creates—his crowning achievement….woman.
   - The 2nd story of creation – underscores how woman is “necessary” for the goodness of man.  Companionship. (See Genesis)
   - One of the heroines of the OT is a woman (Judith).  You’ll find this in the book of Judith.  A book that happens to be absent from the version Pink wants to use. (See Judith)
   - God chooses the Savior of the World to be born of a, you guessed it….woman. One of the important, dare I say heroic acts, in the Bible is when Mary agrees to become the Mother of God.  Given a woman such mighty, awe-inspiring is hardly sexist in my opinion (see the Gospels)
   - Jesus’ first appearance after his Resurrection was to a ….you guessed it, a woman.  The greatest event in Human History, rising from the dead, is performed and he chooses to appear, not to a man, but first to a woman.  And not only that, but he gives this woman a mighty responsibility of telling others.  There is huge significance in that. 
  - Again, it’s tempting to take this Corinthian’s passage or Timothy passage and use that to build your case on, but one can’t ignore Ephesians.  People often cite Ephesians 5 as another “sexist” passage with it’s “Wives be subordinate to your husbands” passage, and then gloss or choose to ignore the next line which states “Husbands, love your wives, even as Christ loved the church and handed himself over for her to sanctify her, cleansing her by the bath of water with the word.”  Ask yourself—how did Christ love the Church?  I’ll dare ask—who has the more difficulty/weighty task?  The wife or the husband?  Christ did everything perfectly.  He suffered for the Church, allowed Himself to be humiliated, tortured, insulted, crucified for the sake of His Church.    gave his life for the Church.  Paul is commanding men (husbands) to be Christ for their Church (wives).  Paul is telling wives to submit to their husbands, but he is also telling husbands to love as Christ loved.  This gives a fuller picture of how Paul viewed the wife/husband relationship. 
 
Slavery
 
Leviticus relates specific laws/rules for a specific time.  If you examine a Middle School or High School text book, you’ll find passages about slavery in the U.S.  Why?  We must learn what our history is about.  Does the fact that HS textbook talk about slavery mean that the current government condones slavery?  Absolutely not. 
 
My opponent cites Leviticus, which were specific rules for a specific time and a specific people.   In order to properly view “slavery” one must take into account the totality of the Bible, context, how does this passage relate to what the rest of the Bible says, and more importantly what Jesus says.   Also Pink is falling into the trap of equating the idea of “slavery” in the OT with our most recent use of slavery in the U.S.  Slavery was viewed differently in the OT.  “Slave” and “servant” were often used interchangeably as denoted by the use of the word “ebed” – they used to use overlap in meaning, not so much these days.  A “Servant” is not inherently negative, but relates to work. 
               
The Pharisees asked Jesus why did Moses permit the Jews to do certain things and Jesus responds “out of the hardness of their heart, but in the beginning it was not so”. 
 
In short, regarding slavery, I have to ask my opponent—how were slaves treated in the OT?  What were the rules/laws regarding the treatment of slaves? 
 
Be careful not to take things out of context.  MLK’s “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” has the following passage “We can never forget that everything Hitler did in Germany was legal”.  Someone, taken the passage out of context, might use to state that MLK condoned the holocaust and all the other atrocities because he calls what they did “legal”.  But when you take it out of context like that, you miss the point of what the author MLK was really trying to state. 

Round 2
Published:
A special thanks to Guitar Slinger for the response!

Intro: 

I’d like to start off by apologizing to the voters and my opponent for accidentally using the wrong source. Me and my opponent discussed which version, they sent me one, I looked it up and found the source I used previously, however, I’d like to mention that I messaged my opponent beforehand confirming this indeed was the correct version. 

After 12 or so hours they didn’t respond and at that point, I was pressed on time so I continued anyway. Regardless I take responsibility for this mistake. 

For the following rounds, I’ll be using this source

However, I'd like to mention that this is almost irrelevant as the quotes I cited still appear in this version and this version only has a few differences my opponent mentioned such as a few new characters and books. 

For reference and clarification, here are the quotes I used from the previous round which are repeated in this version. 

1 Corinthians 14:34-35:

New source

1 Timothy 2:12:

New source 

Leviticus 25:44-46 NLT

New source 

Note: The wording slightly changes and is fitted more for modern English however essentially remains the same. The Bible in this quote still endorses owning slaves. 

Ultimately this doesn’t change the overall point of my previous round and my arguments remain the same. Now onto my rebuttals. 


Sexism:
    - The Story of Creation – as God creates, there is a certain level of “hierarchy” to his creation.  He first starts the lowest levels (some would say least perfect) and keeps getting “better and better” so to speak.  First the earth, then seas, then the animals, and then ultimately humans. The 2nd creation story also highlights the next level of creation—the creation of woman.  So all of the creation gets progressively advanced all the way up to the very last thing he creates—his crowning achievement….woman.

  • No source nor citation is given for me nor the voter to check. Because of this, I am unable to accept this as legitimate and I ask my opponent to cite their source of this in the next round. 

  • Assuming this is correct and this is legitimate, this still doesn’t ignore the underlining fact that in this case, the Bible is inconsistent. 

If the Bible has quotes such as 1 Corinthians 14:34-35: and 1 Timothy 2:12: which demonstrate the Bibles sexism, but then ( possibly ) demonstrates it’s love for women, this proves it’s inconsistent and unclear what the Bible's stance is. 

As I clearly defined in the description of the debate, 

 The goal of a moral system is to find a system which is logically consistent.

This proves that the Bible is very inconsistent when there are passages that demonstrate it’s sexist and nonsexist at the same time.

Because of this inconsistency, my argument still stands. 

Another point I’d like to bring attention to is how difficult it’s to understand my opponent's arguments. 

My opponent doesn’t double space his lines which therefore make them very cluttered, this has made it a bit hard to understand his/her arguments and has made it a bit cumbersome to read. 

Nextly my opponents following points being, 

- The 2nd story of creation – underscores how a woman is “necessary” for the goodness of man.  Companionship. (See Genesis)

And, 

 - God chooses the Savior of the World to be born of a, you guessed it….woman. One of the important, dare I say heroic acts, in the Bible, is when Mary agrees to become the Mother of God.  Given a woman, such mighty, awe-inspiring is hardly sexist in my opinion (see the Gospels) 

Also, are an example of unclear sourcing. 

You can argue that my opponent cites the book however this gives no indication of the chapter in the book, nor which line number. Not only this but they don’t cite a specific quote. This makes it rather troubling for me and the voters to decipher what quote my opponent is using.  Because of this, I’ll wait for my opponent's proper sourcing in the next round hopefully. 

Not to mention these two quotes fall in line with the issue I saw in the previous one, sure this may prove the Bible isn’t sexist. However, the underlying inconsistency cannot be ignored. 

Moving right along, 

   - Jesus’ first appearance after his Resurrection was to a ….you guessed it, a woman.  The greatest event in Human History, rising from the dead, is performed and he chooses to appear, not to a man, but first to a woman.  And not only that, but he gives this woman a mighty responsibility of telling others. There is a huge significance in that.  

  • No citation 

  • Still doesn’t excuse the inconsistency 

- Again, it’s tempting to take this Corinthians passage or Timothy passage and use that to build your case, but one can’t ignore Ephesians.  People often cite Ephesians 5 as another “sexist” passage with it’s “Wives be subordinate to your husbands” passage, and then gloss or choose to ignore the next line which states “Husbands, love your wives, even as Christ loved the church and handed himself over for her to sanctify her, cleansing her by the bath of water with the word.” 

  • This doesn’t excuse the fact that the Bible is still calling wives inferior to their male counterparts. 

For example, imagine if I stated that slavery is perfectly fine but simply stated that slave owners ought to be nice to their slaves. 

Sure a nice slave owner is better than a mean one, but they are still both slave owners. 

Slavery: 

 Leviticus relates specific laws/rules for a specific time.  If you examine a Middle School or High School textbook, you’ll find passages about slavery in the U.S.  Why? We must learn what our history is about.

This is what as commonly known as a false analogy fallacy since my opponent is assuming that because both talk about slavery, this means they both are simply giving a history lesson. 

This couldn’t be further from the truth since in the quote itself the Bible endorses it and last I checked U.S history classes don’t endorse slavery. 

For reference here is Leviticus 25:44-46 NLT and the specific quote. 

 44 The male and female slaves that you possess—these you shall acquire from the nations round about you. 45You may also acquire them from among the resident aliens who reside with you, and from their families who are with you, those whom they bore in your land. These you may possess, 46 and bequeath to your children as their hereditary possession forever.

 Also Pink is falling into the trap of equating the idea of “slavery” in the OT with our most recent use of slavery in the U.S.  Slavery was viewed differently in the OT. “Slave” and “servant” were often used interchangeably as denoted by the use of the word “embed” – they used to use an overlap in meaning, not so much these days.  A “Servant” is not inherently negative but relates to work. 

  • No citation is given to back this up. 

  • In the quote I just previously gave, you’ll notice the bolded sections which give a clear indication that slaves at that time were the owner's possessions and owned forever. More often than not slaves of war. 

This illustrates a clear idea that slavery in that time meant what it means now which according to the source intelligence. Means the forced exploitation of human labor and trafficking. 

As demonstrated by Leviticus up above, the quote implies the slaves are being human trafficked through war and are presumably going to be exploited for whatever the master wants. 

This is what modern slavery is. The people in the Bible orders to be slaves are still being human trafficked/kidnapped and are being exploited for whatever the master pleases. 

Conclusion: 

  • I’ve demonstrated the Bible is still inconsistent with its messages. 

  • I’ve also given a rebuttal to several of my opponent's arguments IE opponents claims on OT slavery being different to modern slavery. 

  • My opponent has made it harder by not offering clear sources to check. 

In the next round, I’ll offer rebuttals and will be bringing up new arguments so stay tuned.

Published:
I. I will be providing the citations in this Response.  In my initial comments/messages to my opponent. I specifically provided a link to the Bible version I was using.  Not sure how much clearer I could have been, and in my opinion the additional questions about the version (which I wasn’t able to answer in time) were not necessary. I will show my opponent is not rejecting the Bible because it is inconsistent, but rather because it's "more inconsistent" then other inconsistent Moral Systems.   

II.The Bible version is relevant.  One of the examples I gave involved the heroine Judith, from the Book of Judith,  which is absent from his version.  There are other books missing from the version my opponent cited. 
 
III. Let the record show that my opponent and I have been engaging in a very friendly discussion related to this particular debate (see comments).  As part of this response, I plan on citing my opponents own words as a source, since it gives insight into my opponents ideas on what "consistent" / "inconsistent" mean and how to determine it.
 
IV. The Debate description centers on what constitutes a good moral system.  Per the description, a good Moral System is one that:
  A. Is consistent
  B. Has consistent outcomes we like
 
Therefore, he argues, the Bible should not be used as a Moral Compass. 
 
V. I’ll address point IV.B first (“has consistent outcomes we like”).  My opponent’s idea of what constitutes a “good moral system” should give us all pause.  Anything that is predicated upon “something we like” is an open invitation to subjectivity and inconsistency.  What we like today may change and may not be what we like tomorrow.  What we deem Moral (Good, Right, Just) today we may deem Immoral (Bad, Wrong, Unjust) tomorrow, depending on the prevailing winds of the day (social sentiment, “progress”, popular vote, or dare I say “whoever happens to be in power”).   Perhaps the reason the Bible is being discarded is not because it’s inconsistent, but rather it doesn’t have “outcomes we like”? 
 
VI. My opponent is arguing NOT that the Bible is inconsistent with itself, but rather it is inconsistent with “something else”.  He claims the bible is inconsistent, but doesn’t say inconsistent with what.  “Consistent” is a term of comparison—when properly used, it is used to describe something, either over time or different occurrences/instances.  If Michael Jordan shoots just one free throw, it would be foolish to say he was “consistent” (or “inconsistent”) in his free throws.  But if he shoots 100 free-throws, you can then comment on his consistency.  Or, alternatively, with the 1 free throw you could comment on his consistency (or inconsistency) relative to other free-throw shooters.  So the question right off the bat becomes, when you are talking about the Bible’s “consistency” (or “inconsistency”), it is in comparison to what?  There are two options here:   you are speaking of its consistency (or inconsistency) either (a) relative to itself or (b) relative to something else.  So when my opponent proclaims “The Bible is inconsistent!”  He should immediately state with what (I.e. “The Bible is inconsistent with ________” or he should be asked “What is it inconsistent with?”  I’ll admit, when I first entered this debate, I thought my opponent would argue that the Bible is inconsistent with itself.  Let’s examine these two possibilities:  “Inconsistent with itself” or “Inconsistent with something else.”
   A.Itself –
      i. Sexism - my opponent provides no evidence that the Bible is inconsistent with itself when it comes to Sexism.  In fact he does the opposite.  All he is doing is highlighting instances (two) he claims are “sexist”.  He doesn’t outright state what or  where the inconsistency is.  In fact, by showing two instances of the same thing, he is actually making the case that it IS CONSISTENT with itself.  Of course, I provided several more instances where it’s not Sexist, but we’ll get to that later. 
     ii.  Slavery – again, my opponent provides no evidence that the Bible is inconsistent with itself when it comes to Slavery.  He only provides one reference (Leviticus), and as we saw above, one can’t use speak of something’s consistency (or inconsistency) to itself if there is only instance.
 
   B.  Something Else.  If my opponent is not arguing it’s inconsistency with “itself”, then he must be arguing it’s inconsistency against “something else”.  This “Something Else” is Society’s view of Women and Slavery, or simply put, Societal Norms and Values.  This is in alignment with what he says his Moral System is :  the benefit to society and if it produces results he is alignment with.  
      i.  Sexism – he compares the Bible vs Society’s history and cites key women throughout history.
      ii. Slavery – he compares the Bible vs Society’s current view of Slavery (not all of Society, just current, prevailing laws for some members of Society). 
 
VII.            So clearly, my opponent is arguing that the Bible is inconsistent, not with itself, but with something else, namely Society’s current norms and values. This basically makes Society’s norms the yardstick (standard, Moral System) upon which my opponent measures Morality (the goodness/badness of something). 
 
XIII. 
    A. Via Comments, my opponent made the following commentFirstly, really you found a moral system that is 100 % consistent, that holds up in ANY scenario, ok share it with me.  This implies that he believes all Moral Systems are to some degree “inconsistent” – I read this to believe that he doesn’t think there exists a Moral System that is 100% consistent.
 
    B. I asked for his definition of “consistent”.   He provided one, which I didn’t agree with because he used the word “consistent” when defining “consistent”.  But my opponent made the statementObviously there is no known 100 % morally consistent system that doesn't lead to absurditiy in some way.  He implies that “inconsistency” depends on either QUANTITY (Majority of inconsistencies) and/or Severity (HUGE inconsistency) as he puts it.  So a Moral System can be considered “inconsistent”, in his opinion, if it:
       i. Has a majority of inconsistencies (QUANTITY), this is somewhat objective or
       ii.Has a HUGE inconsistency.  As he puts it, one inconsistency won’t make or break a system unless it’s a HUGE one (SEVERITY).  This is very subjective.
 
This implies that he believes any 100% Consistent Moral system will lead to absurdity in some way.
 
    C.   My opponent then changes his position.  He states Moral systems can be 100 % consistent but they generally lead to absurdity.”

IX.  So, first he implies there is no known moral system that is 100% consistent (XIII.A above).  Then he says there is no known 100% morally consistent system that doesn’t lead to absurdity in anyway (XIII.B above) (implying always lead to absurdity).  Then he immediately changes and states Moral systems can be 100% consistent but they “generally” lead to absurdity (XIII.C above).  Notice the use of “generally”, implying "not always lead to absurdity".  He goes from “No known 100% consistent moral systems exist” to “100% consistent moral systems can exist, but they lead to absurdity” to “100% moral systems can exist, but generally (not all the time, but sometimes?) lead to absurdity”
 
X.  What prompted the changes in his beliefs on 100% Consistent Moral Systems?  When he made the comment implying there doesn’t exist a 100% Consistent Moral System (see XIII.A above), I said this implies that all Moral systems are to some degree “inconsistent” (otherwise they’d be 100% consistent, which he implied isn’t possible or doesn’t exist).  So he is basically swapping one inconsistent Moral System with another inconsistent Moral System.  But If he truly was discarding the Bible “because it’s inconsistent”, he should be rejecting his current Moral System, because it too is inconsistent (remember he implied no 100% moral system exists).  So he’s not rejecting the Bible because it’s inconsistent (otherwise he’d be rejecting his own Moral System because it too is inconsistent per his comments’ implications), but rather he is rejecting it because his current moral system is “less inconsistent” then the Bible (in his opinion)
 
The notion of rejecting the Bible because it’s inconsistent conflicted with his comments, and thus the Debate (Reject the Bible because it’s Inconsistent) made no sense, so he had to change his idea of “Consistent Moral Systems” again….and again. 
 
 
So, regarding 100% Consistent Moral Systems, he goes from “None exist” to “They exist, but they lead to absurdity” (implying always lead to absurdity) to “They exist, but they generally lead to absurdity” (not always lead to absurdity) to “I HAVE ONE!”
 
Which begs the question, does his Moral System lead to absurdity?  After all, at one point he did say “Obviously there is no known 100 % morally consistent system that doesn't lead to absurditiy in some way.”  (citation is above). I know his moral system wasn’t the topic of debate, so I won’t dwell on his moral system.  But all this does yield some insight into what/how he considers a Moral System to be “inconsistent” vs “consistent”.
 
If my opponent has such a changing, dare I say “inconsistent”, idea of Consistent Moral Systems, how can he make the claim one should be discarded because it’s “inconsistent’ and thus not worthy to be used as a “moral compass”?
 
XI. Now, he did provide further clarifications on  “inconsistency”, there were two:   Quantity and Severity (see above in XIII.B). 
A.  Quantity (Majority) - he implied the Quantity (Majority) of instances would deem a Moral System inconsistent.  In other words, if the quantity of inconsistencies outnumber the number of consistencies, then one could call the Moral System Inconsistent, or conversely if the # of consistencies outnumber the # of inconsistencies, one could call it “consistent”. 
 
B.  Severity - But he also implied quantity may not matter.  That if there was just one inconsistency, a “huge one” as he put it, it could render the Moral System “inconsistent”.  Personally, I like to use the word “doozy”, cuz it’s more fun.  If that one inconsistency was a doozy, then that Moral System could be considered “inconsistent”.  This is what I refer to as “Severity”. 
 
XII.   My negation of his examples:
A.  When it comes to quantity, my opponent only provided 2 examples of how the Bible treats women.  He implies the Bible is inconsistent with Societal Norms based on those two examples.  I, however, provide 6 examples of how the Bible esteems women.  When I last checked, 6 is greater than 2. 
B.  When it comes to “Severity”, I will focus on “Slavery”.  My opponent provides just one instance from Scripture on Slavery, and claims this is an “endorsement of slavery”.  And since there is but one example cited, I’m inclined to think my opponent perceives this as a “huge one”….the “doozy” I referred to earlier.  My response:
 
    i. The Great Commandment - Jesus tell his disciples to love one another.  But not just to love one another, but to love one another as He loves them.  And this is how all will know they are His disciples. He tells them to treat each other as He treated them.   (John 13:34-35) 

    ii. Jesus tells his disciples He doesn’t regard them as slaves, He calls them friends (John 15:15)
 
    iiiJesus also commands his disciples to make disciples of all people (The Great Commission) (Matthew 28:180-20)
 
So he is basically telling his followers:  (a) make everyone disciples and (b) all His disciples are to love one another as He loved them and regard the disciples (i.e. everyone) as friends not slaves.
 
This doesn’t sounds like a ringing endorsement for slavery.  While my opponent may regard his Leviticus reference as huge (a doozy), I see mine as huge as well (a doozy…in fact, I see mine as a huger doozy ;-) ).
 
With regard to quantity, I have more instances of Consistency then my opponent provided in terms inconsistencies.
 
With regard to severity, at a minimum, my opponent and I are at a stalemate when it comes to Slavery. He provides a doozy, I too provide a doozy.
 
XIII.  Citations left off of first response in R1:
 
Story of Creation – Genesis 1:1 – 2:21
               
2nd story of Creation – Genesis 2:1-21
 
The Heroine Judith (The book of Judith in the OT)
 
Savior of the world is born of a woman – Matthew Chapter 1, Luke Chapters 1-2
 
Jesus first appearance was to a woman (women) – Mark 16:9, Matthew 28:8-10,
  
XIV.  Conclusion
 
A.  In the Debate Description and in arguments, my opponent did not define or elaborate on what “Inconsistent” (or “Consistent”) meant when it comes to Moral Systems (how does one determine something is consistent or not).  In comments, he struggled to define or elaborate what “Inconsistent” means when it comes to a Moral System.  Changing his viewpoint multiple times when it came to a “Consistent Moral System”.  This calls into question whether or not he can definitively say any particular Moral System is “consistent” or “inconsistent”.
 
B.  In his arguments, he argued that the bible is inconsistent with Societal Norms., not that it’s inconsistent with itself.  However, if you compare any Moral System, including my Opponent's Moral System, vs Societal Norms, on any given day that Moral System could inconsistent, depending on the norms of the day. 
 
C.  I provided more examples (six) of how the Bible is consistent with Societal Norms (he provided 2), thereby fulfilling his “Majority” requirement he stated in comments.
 
D.  He provided a “doozy” with regard to Slavery (Leviticus).  I provided a doozy with regard to cancelling out slavery (Jesus’ Great Commandments and Commission).  On the surface, a stalemate.  








Round 3
Published:
Hello everyone, welcome to round 3. I’d like to thank my opponent for the response! With that said let’s delve in!

Clearing things up: 
“ In my initial comments/messages to my opponent. I specifically provided a link to the Bible version I was using.  Not sure how much clearer I could have been, and in my opinion, the additional questions about the version (which I wasn’t able to answer in time) were not necessary.” 

  • The bible version you linked had a very strange layout. For example, it didn’t have a search option which made it more annoying for me since I have a master list of all the Bible passages I could use and like to look it up as opposed to shifting between menu’s numerous times. 
  • The question I asked was necessary, I asked if this version was the correct version I could use. I fail to see how this was unnecessary. 

Consistency argument: 

“ II.The Bible version is relevant.  One of the examples I gave involved the heroine Judith, from the Book of Judith,  which is absent from his version. There are other books missing from the version my opponent cited.” 

  • The reason why I cited that the Bible version, in this case, isn’t relevant was that the passages I was quoting still exist in the revised version. Even if there is an addition of this new female character, it still doesn’t excuse the inconsistency and is almost irrelevant to the point I was making. 

“ III. Let the record show that my opponent and I have been engaging in a very friendly discussion related to this particular debate (see comments).  As part of this response, I plan on citing my opponents own words as a source since it gives insight into my opponent's ideas on what "consistent" / "inconsistent" means and how to determine it.” 

  • For the voter reading this I’ll highlight what I defined as consistent and inconsistent just so you don’t have to sift through 20 comments. 

“ I'll admit, I've worded this a bit weirdly so let me explain how this works.

Moral systems can be 100 % consistent but they generally lead to absurdity.

For instance, I can say my moral system is that any living organism must die, well this moral system is consistent however can be rather absurd.

Moral systems can be consistent, it's dependent on the person.

For instance, if you're a psychopath and an idiot, that moral system would work since it's consistent and in your mind, doesn't lead to absurdity.

Obviously, for the vast majority of people, this moral system doesn't work.

Most moral systems and the people who abide by them are sometimes inconsistent.

In the case of the Bible, the system itself is inconsistent and the inconsistency isn't dependent on the person thus making it overall inconsistent. 

I hope this clarifies that moral systems can be consistent, it's mostly dependent on the person.” 
Note: I cut out one portion of the comment towards the end as it’s irrelevant to this debate. For reference, the comment number is # 23 in which I clearly outline what I mean by consistent and inconsistent. Since this point is essentially vital to my opponents R3 argument, I’d ask that voters please read this comment. Thank you. 

“ V. I’ll address point IV.B first (“has consistent outcomes we like”).  My opponent’s idea of what constitutes a “good moral system” should give us all pause.  Anything that is predicated upon “something we like” is an open invitation to subjectivity and inconsistency. Perhaps the reason the Bible is being discarded is not that it’s inconsistent, but rather it doesn’t have “outcomes we like”? 

Note: I cut out some fluff in the middle portion to save character space as it was mostly a clarification on the point. 

  • Morality is inherently subjective. I want to debate whether or not the morality seen in the Bible is moral by both of our standards and if any disagreements occur than we can debate the morality of it. 
So for example, if I cited quotes from the Bible outlining a cruel and unusual punishment the Bible gave and my opponent responded by stating it was justified than we could debate that morality. 

  • Secondly no, when I call the Bible inconsistent, I mean it’s logically inconsistent with itself. I clearly outlined this in the description and in the comment I made. For reference here are the portions of the description in which I clarify that I mean logically inconsistent and in the comment where I clarify that when I call the Bible inconsistent I mean it’s inconsistent with itself. 
Debate Description: 
“ The goal of a moral system is to find a system which is logically consistent.” 
Comment: 
“ In the case of the Bible, the system itself is inconsistent and the inconsistency isn't dependent on the person” 
In these two comments I’ve made, I have clearly outlined to my opponent that when I mean by consistent I mean by logically consistent and when I call the Bible inconsistent I call it inconsistent with itself. 

“ VI. My opponent is arguing NOT that the Bible is inconsistent with itself, but rather it is inconsistent with “something else”. 

Note: This entire portion is irrelevant since I’ve already clearly outlined in the debate description and in a comment what I mean by consistent and inconsistent. 

   i. Sexism - my opponent provides no evidence that the Bible is inconsistent with itself when it comes to Sexism.  In fact, he does the opposite.  All he is doing is highlighting instances (two) he claims are “sexist”.  He doesn’t outright state what or where the inconsistency is. In fact, by showing two instances of the same thing, he is actually making the case that it IS CONSISTENT with itself.  Of course, I provided several more instances where it’s not Sexist, but we’ll get to that later. 
My opponent claims I never proved it was inconsistent by providing two sexist Bible verses but then answers his own question by exclaiming that he provided several instances where it isn’t sexist. 

This is an obvious contradiction within the Bible as highlighted by my opponent. 
If in several quotes I mentioned the Bible exclaims a great deal of sexism and then in my opponents quote it doesn’t, that is an inconsistency by definition. 

  • Secondly, I did state where the inconsistency was in this quote from the previous round. 
“ If the Bible has quotes such as 1 Corinthians 14:34-35: and 1 Timothy 2:12: which demonstrate the Bibles sexism, but then ( possibly ) demonstrates it’s love for women, this proves it’s inconsistent and unclear what the Bible's stance is. “
And I also clarified in another quote later on, 
“ This proves that the Bible is very inconsistent when there are passages that demonstrate it’s sexist and nonsexist at the same time.” 
I clearly outlined where the inconsistency was as demonstrated by these two quotes.
 
“    ii. Slavery – again, my opponent provides no evidence that the Bible is inconsistent with itself when it comes to Slavery.  He only provides one reference (Leviticus), and as we saw above, one can’t use speak of something’s consistency (or inconsistency) to itself if there is only instance.” 
  • I never stated the Slavery stance in the Bible is inconsistent, the inconsistent portion I was referring to was the sexism portion. Therefore this argument is irrelevant since I never made such claims. 
  • Overall this slavery point essentially goes undisputed by my opponent and it still stands. 
“   B. Something Else.  If my opponent is not arguing it’s inconsistency with “itself”, then he must be arguing it’s inconsistency against “something else”.  This “Something Else” is Society’s view of Women and Slavery, or simply put, Societal Norms and Values. This is in alignment with what he says his Moral System is :  the benefit to society and if it produces results he is alignment with. “ 

  • Already clarified in the Debate description and my clarification comment on what I was referring to when I mentioned the Bibles inconsistency.
  • Secondly, I clearly stated in the comments that I don’t appeal to societal norms and values and any time our values align is a coincidence. 
  • Thirdly my personal views are almost irrelevant to the discussion and have no place here. Since it appears my opponent agrees that the Bible’s quotes I’ve mentioned are indeed sexist and racist, my personal views are irrelevant. 

  i. Sexism – he compares the Bible vs Society’s history and cites key women throughout history.
      ii. Slavery – he compares the Bible vs Society’s current view of Slavery (not all of Society, just current, prevailing laws for some members of Society). 

  • Firstly I compared the Bible vs. society’s history with women not to show an inconsistency but to show the Bibles blatant sexism by casting women aside when they have indeed achieved a great deal throughout history. 
  • Secondly, you’re the one who brought up modern slavery point in the first place. I was simply clarifying that when the Bible references slavery, it’s referring to actual modern slavery. Since you were making the claim of the references not pertaining to modern slavery as your argument. 

Essentially this is a falsehood and takes the arguments out of context. 
 
XIII. 
    A. Via Comments, my opponent made the following comment “Firstly, really you found a moral system that is 100 % consistent, that holds up in ANY scenario, ok share it with me”. 

  • I clarified in my clarification comment that from in the very beginning in which I clarify that I’ve worded everything weirdly and I’ll use this comment for clarification purposes. Therefore my previous comments shouldn’t be taken seriously as I’ve already stated that they weren’t accurate. Because of this, XIII should be cast aside since it’s built upon a comment I’ve admitted wasn’t accurate. 
“ But If he truly was discarding the Bible “because it’s inconsistent”, he should be rejecting his current Moral System, because it too is inconsistent (remember he implied no 100% moral system exists).  So he’s not rejecting the Bible because it’s inconsistent (otherwise he’d be rejecting his own Moral System because it too is inconsistent per his comments’ implications), but rather he is rejecting it because his current moral system is “less inconsistent” then the Bible (in his opinion)” 
  • Firstly, my personal moral system is irrelevant. 
  • Secondly, like the previous comment I’ve made, this is built upon the falsehood of an inaccurate comment I’ve made. 
  • Thirdly, I've already outlined in the description and in my clarification comment what I meant by consistent. There’s a reason why I clearly stated that the Bible is inconsistent with itself. 
“ He then stated this gem:  “My moral system is 100 % consistent in and of itself. “ 
 
Which begs the question, does his Moral System lead to absurdity?  After all, at one point he did say “Obviously there is no known 100 % morally consistent system that doesn't lead to absurdity in some way.”  (citation is above).
  • Firstly again, my moral system is irrelevant. 
  • Secondly again I’ve already clarified in the description and in my clarification comment on what I was referring to by inconsistent. 
“ If my opponent has such a changing, dare I say “inconsistent”, idea of Consistent Moral Systems, how can he make the claim one should be discarded because it’s “inconsistent’ and thus not worthy to be used as a “moral compass”?” 
  • Firstly it isn’t inconsistent since I made a clear clarification comment. 
  • Secondly, I disregard the Bible in this context because it’s inconsistent with itself which I clearly outlined in my clarification comment. 
 XI.

This entire part is irrelevant since the clarification comment and the description of the debate defined what I meant by consistent and inconsistent.

 
“ XII.   My negation of his examples:
A.  When it comes to quantity, my opponent only provided 2 examples of how the Bible treats women.  I, however, provide 6 examples of how the Bible esteems women.  When I last checked, 6 is greater than 2. “ 
  • Firstly this is built upon the falsehood of the previous comments I’ve made and not the clarification comment where I clearly outline what I mean by consistency. 
  • Secondly, this still doesn’t disprove the Bible’s inconsistency. 
“ B.  When it comes to “Severity”, I will focus on “Slavery”.  My opponent provides just one instance from Scripture on Slavery, and claims this is an “endorsement of slavery”.  And since there is but one example cited, I’m inclined to think my opponent perceives this as a “huge one”….the “doozy” I referred to earlier.  My response:
  • Never stated the Bible’s views on slavery was inconsistent. And again this also is built upon the falsehood of previous disregarded comments I’ve made and not my clarification comment. 
“   While my opponent may regard his Leviticus reference as huge (a doozy), I see mine as huge as well (a doozy…in fact, I see mine as a huger doozy ;-) ).” 
  • Firstly the wink seems a bit condescending and I’d ask my opponent to refrain from using it and have better debate conduct. Granted I’m not offended however I would like for voters to consider my opponent's condescending winks he’s making. 
  • Secondly, I changed my mind, from the quotes you’ve demonstrated the Bible is actually inconsistent with its stance on slavery. 
Similar to sexism, the Bible has two stances of slavery, one being an endorsement and one being condemning it which makes it logically inconsistent due to the opposing stances exhibited. 

Thirdly, this is once again built upon a falsehood.  
“ A.  In the Debate Description and in arguments, my opponent did not define or elaborate on what “Inconsistent” (or “Consistent”) meant when it comes to Moral Systems (how does one determine something is consistent or not). This calls into question whether or not he can definitively say any particular Moral System is “consistent” or “inconsistent”.” 
Debate Description: 
“ The goal of a moral system is to find a system which is logically consistent.” 
Clarification Comment: 
“ In the case of the Bible, the system itself is inconsistent” 
  • I’ve clearly defined what I mean by consistency being logical consistency and in my clarification comment, I elaborated that the Bible itself is inconsistent. 
The rest of my opponent's arguments are built on the falsehood of previous disregarded comments I’ve made and not on the clarification comment nor the debate description. 

Note: I am unable to provide a proper conclusion and bring in new arguments due to character limit and had to cut out a few redundant falsehood arguments to save space. My apologies. 

That being said I may or may not bring them up later


Published:
“Joe never said Steve stole the money”
Very simple sentence, right?  Pretty straight-forward, right?  Just 7 words:  “Joe never said Steve stole the money.”
Imagine you discover paper, or a stone, a piece of papyrus, or a scroll that has these 7 words written on it.  How would you interpret?

Interpretation #1 – If you emphasize the word “Joe”, the interpretation is that Joe is defending himself, saying it wasn’t him who said Steve stole the money, that it was someone else who said it.

Interpretation #2 – If you emphasize the word “said”, the interpretation is that the Joe didn’t verbally say Steve stole the money, but perhaps he wrote it down or hinted at it in some other way.

Interpretation #3 – If you emphasize the word “Steve”, the interpretation is that the Joe isn’t saying STEVE stole the money, but is implying someone else stole the money.

Interpretation #4 – If you emphasize the word “stole”, the interpretation is that Joe  isn’t saying Steve STOLE the money, but perhaps Steve did something else—gave it to charity, put in safe-keeping, etc.

Interpretation #5 – If you emphasize the word “money”, the interpretation is that Joe isn’t saying Steve stole the MONEY, but rather Steve stole something else—maybe Steve stole livestock, a car, the heart of another woman. 
 
This one simple 7 word sentence has at least 5 different interpretations.  If this one small sentence can have multiple meanings/interpretations, imagine what could happen with a collection of books—a collection that has over 60 books, each book containing several chapters, multiple themes, multiple literary techniques, multiple styles and literary forms etc.

The purpose of words, either spoken, written or printed is to convey ideas, concepts, and thoughts.  Whose ideas—the ideas of the reader/hearer?  No, the purpose/intent of words is to convey the ideas, thoughts, and concepts of the person, the author, who spoke the words, wrote the words, or written the words. When one proclaims “This writing endorses slavery!”, you are basically saying the author is saying “slavery is ok.”—you are starting what you believe what the author intends.  Which begs the question, is the correct interpretation?

Now, what if there were additional texts (papers, stones, papyrus, or scrolls) that had additional texts that could perhaps shed light on what the meaning/purpose is for that one 7-word sentence.  If you truly wanted to know and understand the intent/purpose of those 7 words, do you think it would be wise to ignore what the other texts happen to say on the matter?
- Perhaps there are other texts that indicate that those 7 words were actually part of script for a play that has two characters, Steve and Joe. 
- Perhaps there are other texts that indicate that those 7 words were actually part of a silly child’s game played between a Father (Joe) and Son (Steve).

The possibilities are endless.  It would be foolish to assume that the only correct interpretation is the 1st one, and ignore what other texts, works, authors have to say on the matter.

From the moment we learn to read, we start to learn how we are to interpret what we read.  In other words, we learn to start to take into account things like context, who wrote it, why/when did they write it, what is its purpose, etc.   When we first started reading Aesop’s Fables as children, we learned very early that the story of the Ant and the Grasshopper wasn’t meant to be taken literally.  “But Mommy, I don’t believe that story because it has a talking Ant and a talking Grasshopper.  Everybody knows insects can’t talk!”  “But son, the whole point of the story is to convey a moral, a message about hard work and preparation.  The author just uses talking Ants and Grasshoppers to help communicate this message.  See…Mr. Aesop has other stories as well that are written the same way.”
When you ignore things like context, the intent of the author, timeframe it was written, the type of literature, etc you run the risk of not interpreting it correctly.
I know my opponent believes this.  I know my opponent believes that texts have specific ways that they need to be read and interpreted.  How do I know this?  When I referenced his comments he was very quick to point out my errors in how his comments were taken or construed, basically implying “That’s not what I meant when I wrote those comments.  You’re interpreting them incorrectly.” He also, in Round 2, makes the implication that I am interpreting Leviticus wrong (i.e. like a textbook) and it is not to be interpreted that way.  SO this implies he knows or believes there is a proper way to interpret texts.  In addition, in Round 3 he states “Essentially this is a falsehood and takes the arguments out of context. “  Wow.  All of sudden context is important to him—he says this as if it matters what the author (him) of the text (his comments) meant when he wrote it.  But when it comes to something like the Bible, he ignores context…..

My opponent seems to ignore all that when it comes to the Bible.  He takes one passage, be it from Leviticus, Corinthians or Timothy and proclaims “This is what the Bible teaches or condones” based on those passages.  He ignores what the rest of the Bible, nay, the rest of those specific texts have to say.
Am I saying he’s wrong in his interpretation?  Yes.  Why?  Because he’s ignoring what the rest of  Leviticus and the rest of the Bible state and what the authors (or those who compiled the Bible) intended or wrote elsewhere.

1. I’ve provided what other passages, in particular the NT, mention in how we are to treat others. 
2.The canon of the Bible was compiled (put together) by Christians (followers of Jesus Christ). It would be foolish to ignore what they say and what Jesus, their leader, state in other places of that same book—The Bible.
 
I’m also challenging him in how does he really know his is the correct interpretation?

Slavery

1.       My opponent takes one passage from Leviticus and uses that as his foundation for proclaiming that the Bible endorses slavery.  That’s akin to taking one line from Aesop’s fables and proclaiming “Aesop believes animals can talk so we should ignore his teachings!”  Or akin to taking Orwell’s “Animal Farm” and proclaiming “Orwell believes animals can talk and form governments!  This is preposterous we should discard what he says!”  When you do this, you are missing the main point of “Aesop’s Fables”, “Animal Farm” or the Bible. 
What is the purpose of the talking animals in Aesop’s fables or Orwell’s Animal Farm?  Is it to promote the idea that Animals can talk and form governments?  Of course not.  What is the purpose of the Leviticus passage?  Is it to promote Slavery and inculcate slavery as permissible for all of time?  No.  How do we know this?  Based on what the Bible, specifically Jesus, who’s followers compiled the Bible, says elsewhere on how we are treat people.

2.        My opponent  can’t seem to decide exactly what he’s arguing when it comes to Slavery:
a.       In the Debate description, he states that the reason to reject the Bible is because it doesn’t it doesn’t satisfy  these requirements:
   i.      Is logically consistent
   ii.      we agree with where we get consistent outcomes we like. (Note: It is interesting how this is used or added.  The Bible may actually be consistent when it comes to certain things, but if he doesn’t agree with the consistent outcomes, it gives him an “out” so he can discard it.  )
b.      He states the Bible endorses slavery and cites the Leviticus passage (Round 1)
    i.      He uses these 3 lines to proclaim that the Bible as a whole promotes Slavery
    ii.      He seems to argue it’s inconsistency (hypocrisy) with itself by stating the Bible says elsewhere that Israel is free, etc (although he provides no citations for this)
   iii.      He ignores what Leviticus says, just a few lines later in line 53 (Leviticus 25:53) in which God describes how the Master shall treat the bondmen/bondwomen:
-          “As a servant hired year by year shall he be with him: he shall not rule with rigor over him in thy sight.” (His ASV version)
-          Both are basically saying that servants (bondman, serf, slave) shall not be treated harshly.  This hardly sounds like forced exploitation and trafficking.  And hardly comparable to modern-day or recent slavery. 
  iv.     He also ignores what the Bible says elsewhere about how we are to treat others (notably Jesus, who’s followers actually were the ones that compiled said Bible)
c.       He then implies that my interpretation of Leviticus is wrong.  As if there is some correct way to interpret it, and he has this correct way, and I don’t (Round 2).  But it begs the question, if he is ignoring what the rest of the text (either Leviticus and the Bible itself) have to say on Slavery or with regard to slavery, how can he be interpreting it correctly?
d.       In Round 3, he states that he is indeed arguing that the Bible is inconsistent with itself (but doesn’t cite which specific passages it’s inconsistent with).
e.      Then, he drops this bombshell in Round 3:
I never stated the Slavery stance in the Bible is inconsistent, the inconsistent portion I was referring to was the sexism portion. Therefore this argument is irrelevant since I never made such claims.
 
Um, that is what he was arguing initially in Round 1.  That the Bible endorses slavery….but yet at the same time the Bible also doesn’t endorse slavery for some (Israel) is thus inconsistent (not the same moment to moment)
 
But then, again in Round 3, based on other passages of the Bible, he switches gears and says that the Bible is inconsistent on Slavery.  So just to recap—He argued it was inconsistent, but then states he wasn’t arguing that it was inconsistent, but then changes his mind and says it’s inconsistent.
 
Which begs the question, has he not been considering the other passages of the Bible before, and why now?
 
f.          So the questions for my opponent are this
        i.      What exactly is the Bible’s take (position, message) on Slavery?  And did he arrive at this conclusion—be simply reading the passage and not considering context and what the rest of the Bible says? As he admits, in one instance it endorses and on the other hand it condemns it.  But if two things are said or thought to be contradicting or inconsistent, how can you say definitively it is one or the other?  Without context, you can’t.  But with context you can. 
 
I can say “I hate vegetables”.  But I also say “I love vegetables”.  Can you say definitively that I hate vegetables?  But what if I only said I hated vegetables once, but said I loved vegetables many more times—does that give you some insight into my stance on vegetables?   One person could say “He endorses vegetable eating!”  The other can say “He despises Vegetable eating”.  Who’s right?   I’m sure this will be written off as a false analogy or strawman, but this is done to illustrate a point.   Context matters.  We know it, and my opponent knows it.  Yet he refuses to take context or the rest of the Bible into consideration, unless it supports his position.
 
    ii.      But now let’s suppose for the sake of argument that it is inconsistent when it comes to slavery, then what is the implication of that?  If you believe that the Bible is meant to be a treatise on slavery, then the implication is huge—you will deem it inconsistent and not worthy to be followed, as my opponent does.
But is it a treatise on slavery?  Is that the purpose of the Bible?  —what does the author say the purpose of that passage is?  And why is Leviticus even in the Bible in the first place?
But if it is not intended to be a treatise on slavery, but rather showing God’s relationship to man, then “inconsistency” is not a reason to discard it, but one must interpret this “inconsistency” in light of this larger view. 
Let’s say I compile a group of books into one collection—  Let’s call this collection The ComBible and in this compilation are the following books:
Night by Elie Weisel
Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Franke
The Gulag Archipelago  by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
Animal Farm by George Orwell
The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich – William Shirer
Letter from a Birmingham Jail – Martin Luther King, Jr
Man’s Search for Meaning - Viktor Frankl
 
These books were collected in this manner for a reason.  If you do not know that reason, then you may not be evaluating the collection properly.  Would it be wise to discard the ComBible and say “This collection believes animals can talk and form governments!  This is ludicrous!  We should not use this as a guide!”  I would say, not only are you missing the point of what that specific author (Orwell) intended show with that specific book (Animal Farm), but your aslo missing the point the person who compiled the book intended to show. 
 
 
Conclusion:
By proclaiming “The Bible endorses slavery”, my opponent is implying he has dove into the minds of the author and have somehow gleaned this is what he (they) meant when he (they) wrote Leviticus and (compiled) the Bible. 

He offers no evidence, other than just a surface reading of Leviticus, and comparing it to other passages (with my help). 

Finally, I want to add, because I am just now remembering it….My opponent makes the claim that his moral system is irrelevant (see Round 3)
His moral system is completely relevant.  He is passing judgement on the Bible as a Moral Compass (i.e. rendering it either good or bad).  Whenever you pass judgement on something, be it a person, an action, or text, you are essentially making an appeal (i.e. using) to whatever Moral System you have in place.  I question the “consistency” of such moral systems when it has as one of its foundations “something we like”.






Round 4
Published:
Introduction: 

Greetings everyone, I’d like to start off by thanking any voters or just readers for making this far. As well as my opponent for responding! 

One thing I’d like to clear up for my opponent and voters is I may or may not be able to post my round 5 conclusions as this weekend I’ll be gone on a camping trip and won’t be back until Sunday afternoon. We’ll see how it goes though however, I would like to apologize for any voters and my opponent assuming I’ve had to FF the final round. 

Anyways let’s dive in head first! 

Interpretation:
My opponents first part of their argument delves into how different texts can be interpreted in different ways. 

A problem I have is how long this portion is. This portion could’ve been explained in a few sentences or one paragraph rather than 5. Minor nitpick but just thought I’d give a level of transparency that I haven’t avoided this section and it’s mostly unneeded filler I don’t need to delve into. Now onto the actual arguments themselves. 

“ The possibilities are endless.  It would be foolish to assume that the only correct interpretation is the 1st one, and ignore what other texts, works, authors have to say on the matter. “ 

  • Firstly regarding sexism, I’ve cited not one but two quotes. Therefore this argument of perhaps it’s a coincidence that the interpretation is wrong is false and this still doesn’t ignore the inconsistency in the moral system regarding sexism. 

  • Secondly regarding slavery, my opponent never actually provided other scriptures debunking my point on slavery. All my opponent cited were scriptures that stated that slave masters should be nice to their slaves. I’ve already debunked this point previously in another round so I’ll debunk it again. 

Slavery is still slavery. A slave owner being nice is irrelevant when they’re still exploiting and violating other people’s human rights. 

“ My opponent seems to ignore all that when it comes to the Bible.  He takes one passage, be it from Leviticus, Corinthians or Timothy and proclaims “This is what the Bible teaches or condones” based on those passages.  He ignores what the rest of the Bible, nay, the rest of those specific texts have to say.” 

  • Because consistency matters as outlined by the description which by accepting the debate, you’ve essentially agreed to. If one portion of the Bible endorses slavery and another condemns it, this is a logical inconsistency by definition. 

“ 1.       My opponent takes one passage from Leviticus and uses that as his foundation for proclaiming that the Bible endorses slavery.  That’s akin to taking one line from Aesop’s fables and proclaiming “Aesop believes animals can talk so we should ignore his teachings!”  Or akin to taking Orwell’s “Animal Farm” and proclaiming “Orwell believes animals can talk and form governments! This is preposterous we should discard what he says!”  When you do this, you are missing the main point of “Aesop’s Fables”, “Animal Farm” or the Bible. “ 


My opponent is comparing Aesop’s fables which is a fiction text to the Bible which is ( presumably ) a nonfiction text. Not only Aesop’s fables but also animal farm when the two referenced texts and the Bible are completely different and not alike. 

Not only this but comparing Animals talking in Animal farm which again is a nonfiction text, to the Bible literal endorsement of slavery isn’t the same concept.

“ 2.        My opponent can’t seem to decide exactly what he’s arguing when it comes to Slavery:
a.       In the Debate description, he states that the reason to reject the Bible is that it doesn’t satisfy  these requirements:
   i.      Is logically consistent 
   ii.      we agree with where we get consistent outcomes we like. (Note: It is interesting how this is used or added.  The Bible may actually be consistent when it comes to certain things, but if he doesn’t agree with the consistent outcomes, it gives him an “out” so he can discard it.  )” 

  • I stated in the description this, 

“ To summarize, a good moral system is consistent and doesn't lead to absurdity

From what we can take from the debate description, a good moral system has to be logically consistent and give us consistent outcomes we like. 

Therefore I do not necessarily have to prove both. 

If the Bible is consistent but leads to absurdity than it’s a bad moral system by the debate description. 

If the Bible is inconsistent and is unclear what its message is, it should also be disregarded as stated in the debate description. 

Therefore I do not have to prove both as my opponent is perpetuating. 

“ iii.      He ignores what Leviticus says, just a few lines later inline 53 (Leviticus 25:53) in which God describes how the Master shall treat the bondmen/bondwomen:
-          “As a servant hired year by year shall he be with him: he shall not rule with rigor over him in thy sight.” (His ASV version)
-          “The tenant alien shall treat those who sold themselves as laborers hired on an annual basis, and the alien shall not lord it over them harshly before your very eyes.” (my NABRE version)” 

  • Already debunked in a previous round and previously seen in this round. 

It doesn’t matter if the slave owners rule harshly or not, slave owners are still slave owners. It doesn’t excuse the fact that slave owners are violating human rights. 

“ -          Both are basically saying that servants (bondman, serf, slave) shall not be treated harshly.  This hardly sounds like forced exploitation and trafficking. And hardly comparable to modern-day or recent slavery. “ 

  • The slaves as described in the Bible are being kidnapped thus being trafficked. Which therefore according to the United Nations, violated their human rights. 

  • The slaves are owned by masters and are forced to do labor against their will, thus being exploited. Which therefore according to the United Nations, violated their human rights. 

Therefore whether they’re ruled harshly or not is irrelevant, I’m sure my opponent wouldn’t be fine if I kidnapped him and forced him to do manual labor against his will. Then used the excuse that I’m ruling over him as nicely as possible. 

Sure a nice slave owner is certainly better than a mean one, however at the end of the day in this analogy, I’d still be exploiting and trafficking my opponent as seen in the Bible. Whether or not the slave owner rules over them harshly is irrelevant. 
“ d.       In Round 3, he states that he is indeed arguing that the Bible is inconsistent with itself (but doesn’t cite which specific passages it’s inconsistent with).” 

In the previous round, 

“Similar to sexism, the Bible has two stances of slavery, one being an endorsement and one being condemning it which makes it logically inconsistent due to the opposing stances exhibited.“

  • As can be seen from the previous round, I’m going off of the passages from my argument and your argument. Therefore this argument is false. 

“ e.      Then, he drops this bombshell in Round 3:
“I never stated the Slavery stance in the Bible is inconsistent, the inconsistent portion I was referring to was the sexism portion. Therefore this argument is irrelevant since I never made such claims.”
Um, that is what he was arguing initially in Round 1.  That the Bible endorses slavery….but yet at the same time the Bible also doesn’t endorse slavery for some (Israel) is thus inconsistent (not the same moment to moment) “ 

Firstly Never referred to this portion as inconsistent, just hypocritical. 

If you actually read the portion, I never called it inconsistent and hypocritical. 

The standards of slavery only applying to some areas and not others is technically a consistent system. 

I referred to it as hypocritical since this demonstrates the Bible is racist. 

I suppose I could have worded this better as when I meant hypocritical I meant racist. 

“  As he admits, in one instance it endorses and on the other hand, it condemns it.  But if two things are said or thought to be contradicting or inconsistent, how can you say definitively it is one or the other?  Without context, you can’t. But with context, you can. “

  • Which is precisely why in that round I stated that I’ve changed my mind and the Bible’s views on slavery are inconsistently assuming my opponent is correct in their quotations somehow proving the Bible isn’t endorsing it. 
Either way, the Bible is either just plainly absurd if you disregard my opponent's quotes on slavery due to their irrelevance. 

Or even if you do take into account these quotes, it still doesn’t disprove the blatant inconsistency as demonstrated by the Bible. 

“ I can say “I hate vegetables”.  But I also say “I love vegetables”.  Can you say definitively that I hate vegetables?  But what if I only said I hated vegetables once but said I loved vegetables many more times—does that give you some insight into my stance on vegetables? “ 

Firstly this is another false equivalence. Stating that your opinion regarding vegetables which is a subjective opinion to the Bible which is supposed to be the words from an all-knowing being who is supposed to be 100 % consistent. 

However, one could make the argument that in the debate we’re assuming God is subjective which is fair. 

However, this still should be taken into consideration, since even in a subjective view God’s view of morality is still a morality we ought to take into consideration given his wisdom. 

Secondly, while the stance of the person's opinion regarding vegetables is not enough to judge it still is an inconsistency. 

“ Yet he refuses to take context or the rest of the Bible into consideration unless it supports his position.” 

  • Because it’s an inconsistency and as outlined by the description. An inconsistent morality system isn’t a good one. 

“ Let’s say I compile a group of books into one collection—  Let’s call this collection The ComBible and in this compilation are the following books:
Night by Elie Weisel
Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Franke
The Gulag Archipelago  by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
Animal Farm by George Orwell
The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich – William Shirer
Letter from a Birmingham Jail – Martin Luther King, Jr
Man’s Search for Meaning - Viktor Frankl “ 

Another false equivalence, these books are insanely different from one another, unlike the Bible which is mostly all compiled in the same time period, all are presumably nonfiction, and all are taking the morality system from one person. 

Firstly Animal Farm is a fiction book which is rather different from nonfiction historical biographies or documents. 

Secondly, Letter from a Birmingham Jail is from the civil rights movement and not concerning the holocaust. 

Thirdly, The Gulag Archipelago a biography set in a Soviet Union Gulag and not in the holocaust. 

Fourthly, The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich isn’t a bibliography documented during the actual times of the events. 

This is a rather interesting group of books my opponent compiles, one of which is fiction, two are irrelevant to the holocaust, and another isn’t a bibliography. 

My opponent seems to be arguing that I am taking the Bible out of context since the Bible is a collection of different books. 

Books which were written about the same subject, unlike my opponent's example which has books ranging from a wide array of subjects. 

Books which were also all ( presumably ) nonfiction, unlike my opponent's example. 

Taking this into account, this analogy is a false equivalence and should be disregarded as such. 

“.My opponent makes the claim that his moral system is irrelevant (see Round 3)
His moral system is completely relevant.  He is passing judgment on the Bible as a Moral Compass (i.e. rendering it either good or bad).  Whenever you pass judgment on something, be it a person, an action, or text, you are essentially making an appeal (i.e. using) to whatever Moral System you have in place.” 

I am not passing judgment on a moral system by my own moral system. I am passing judgment on it with a combination of our moral systems. 

However since my opponent never has disagreements with the morality of sexism or slavery, our moral systems are irrelevant. 

Passing judgment with a combination of our moral systems through debate is far different than my opponents rambles on how my moral system is inconsistent when my moral system is irrelevant due to us having no disagreements regarding the morality of sexism and slavery. 

Therefore this point is irrelevant. 

Conclusion: 

  • My opponent has made multiple false equivalence fallacies. 

  • My opponent has still yet to counter my claims regarding the Bible being logically inconsistent. 

  • My opponent has misinterpreted the debate description

Once again thank you for my opponent's responses and any voters who’ve made it this far.

I could've provided further quotations however at this point I've deemed them to be unnecessary. I apologize if anyone was looking forward to them and I may or may not do another debate concerning this subject. If I do I can assure I'll bring them up as the quotes defiantly bring into question the Bibles sense of justice. 

- PinkFreud08


Published:
Just to clarify, my opponent makes the claim that by accepting the debate, I’ve agreed to what’s in the description.  I beg to differ.  The description is just an expansion (dare I say, a description) of what’s in the debate title.  Accepting a debate is not automatically accepting (conceding) the points made in the Description.  What’s in the debate description is what’s being debated in as much as what the Debate Title says.  What is in the debate description is not automatically accepted as FACT.  What is a debate description?  It’s a description about what the debate is about.  If the debate description happened to state something to the effect of “Acceptance of debate is accepting the Bible is inconsistent”, then I would agree with my opponent.  But it doesn’t. 
The onus is not on me to argue, justify or explain away the inconsistencies (which I’ve done by the way).  What I am arguing is that “inconsistency” alone is not necessarily a good one reason to discard a Moral System, especially if one (a) can’t show that it’s an inconsistency, or prove that this is what the Bible is in fact teaching. 

My opponent continues to argue his Moral System is irrelevant.  I say it’s absolutely relevant.  He is making a judgement on something as good or bad, and the moment you make a judgement as “good” or “not good (i.e “bad”) you are appealing to whatever Moral System you have in place.  Saying something is “inconsistent” is not assigning morality—it’s simply stating data or facts.  Had he just left it at that, I would agree and say he is correct, his moral system is irrelevant.  However, the moment you call that something “good” or “bad” you are turning it into a Morality question. 

So it is absolutely relevant.  And not only is my opponent’s Moral System relevant, it’s critical that it be a Good Moral system.  For if the Moral System he uses (the Moral System that deems the Bible “not good”), then his basis for deeming the Bible “not good” is flawed, and his argument falls apart. 

My opponent says “To summarize, a good moral system is consistent and doesn't lead to absurdity.” And that if a Good Moral System (GMS) doesn’t meet both requirements, it is to be discarded.  That’s basically the foundation for his rejection of the Bible.  Please note that according to this definition, in order to be deemed “Good” (and thus, not discarded), a Moral System (MS) must satisfy both:   be (A) consistent AND (B) not lead to absurdity.  It can therefore be inferred that if a MS fails either one of these requirements (fails A OR fails B), then that MS is to be discarded.  In short, it doesn’t pass the GMS sniff test. 
Put Simply:
                A Good Moral System (GMS) must satisfy BOTH of these requirements:
(A)   – be consistent
(B)   – doesn’t lead to absurdity
Likewise, a Moral System must be discarded if it fails either (A) or (B) or both—but only one need fail in order to be discarded. 
Implications of this:

1.       This becomes the “yard stick” against which other Moral Systems are measured.  It effectively is a Moral System that is used to pass judgement (deem good or bad) on other Moral Systems.  This IS a moral system.  Whenever you use something else as a yardstick to measure other things and deem them “good” or “not good,” that something is in effect a “Moral System” which is used to evaluate something as “good” or “not good.”  He is assigning morality based on whether or not it’s consistent or not.  If it’s “inconsistent”, it’s bad—no ifs, ands or buts.  If it’s inconsistent, it must be discarded—no ifs, ands or buts.  Same goes for “leading to absurdity”.  This is a very important point—you will need to remember this later on.  SO, these guidelines effectively become the Moral System that is thus used to deem the Bible as “good” or “not good”—in other words, it is what we use to assess the Bible’s morality.  Let’s call this Moral System “X”
2.       It is also safe to infer that this Moral System, “X”, must itself be consistent and not lead to absurdity, otherwise it will violate its own rules and thus lead to it itself being deemed not good and thus discarded). 
3.       If it is to be consistent, then it this Moral System, “X”, must be used to evaluate all other Moral Systems , otherwise there is no consistency, and one simply chose this Moral system (analyzing consistency and absurdity) because it met one’s agenda (to discard the Bible).

Now, my opponent has a Moral System “Z” and he uses this Moral System “Z” to evaluate another Moral System, the Bible.  Again, he claims his moral system “Z” is irrelevant, but I explained why it’s relevant above (paragraph 3).  If his own Moral System “Z” is itself “not good”, then his deeming the Bible is “not good” is baseless, since the moral system “Z” he uses is “not good”.  So, in reality, we NEED to know if his Moral System “Z” is good (or “not good”).

My opponent must use this same Moral System “Z” to evaluate not just the Bible, but other Moral Systems as well, whatever they may be.  If not, he is being selective, not consistent and is rejecting the Bible while using a completely different Moral System  to evaluate other Moral Systems. 

Do we know exactly what Moral System “Z” he used in order to deem the Bible good or ‘not good’, yes we do—it’s the same as the one that’s in the description.  But what’s most important is, this Moral System “Z” he uses:
                is it consistent?  Yes or NO…..if no, then my opponent’s Moral System it is to be discarded (see (A) above), or
                does it lead to absurdity?  Yes or NO.  If yes, then my opponent’s Moral System is to be discarded (see (B) above)
And if it is to be discarded, then it follows his claim that “the Bible is not good” is baseless, since the Moral System he himself used to deem it “not good” is itself “not good.”

Remember, only 1 (either A or B) needs to fail in order for it to be deemed “not good” and thus discarded.

You may recall that in previous rounds and comments, my opponent made the implication in one of his comments that there is no “100% consistent” moral system. Thereby implying that all Moral Systems are to a certain degree inconsistent.  But if all moral systems are inconsistent, they are to be discarded by definition….including his own….remember the rules above?  If it’s “inconsistent” (doesn’t matter to what degree), it is to be discarded—no ifs, ands or buts.  No wonder he backpedaled rapidly form this assertion—his own pronouncements “incriminated” (deemed “not good”) his own moral system.  But this is important:

1.        He evaluated other moral systems against some yardstick (his own Moral System “Z”) and declared them to be inconsistent, and by his own definition (in debate description) thus assigned a morality (good or not good to them).  Again, it doesn’t matter what “Z” is—he just used it to deem it “not good”.

2.       Later, he re-evaluated other moral systems again, but yielded a different result—not all Moral Systems are “not good”, some are actually “good”. 

What was his moral system “Z” that he used to evaluate these other Moral Systems?  It’s the same as in the debate description.  It has to be, otherwise he’d be rejecting one Moral System (The Bible) for one reason, but not using the same yardstick to accept/reject other Moral Systems.

But herein lies my opponent’s conundrum.  He used the exact same Moral System “Z” (same as the debate description) to evaluate Moral Systems two different times, and yielded two different results:  1st result was that “there is no 100% Consistent Moral System” (or put another way all Moral Systems are inconsistent to a certain degree)….2nd result was “some moral systems are consistent”

What could explain the 2 different results?  There are two possibilities:
           Possibility #1 – Moral System “Z” is inconsistent - If the Moral System “Z” (which again, is the same Moral System of the debate description) is inconsistent, then, by my opponent’s definition it is “not good”, and if it is not good it is to be discarded.  But it was this same Moral System “Z” that was used to evaluate the Bible.  But his evaluation of the Bible is not good is baseless, since the Moral System “Z” used to arrive at that is inconsistent and thus “not good”

             Possibility #2 – Moral System “Z” is in fact consistent, but was used inconsistently by my opponent.

But my opponent made the claim that his Moral System is 100% consistent in and of itself, which leaves the only option that it was used inconsistently by my opponent. 

If my opponent used is Moral System inconsistently to evaluate other Moral Systems, how confident are we that he used it correctly to evaluate the Bible?
My opponent is always making the claim that my analogies are false analogies etc.  I’m not using the analogies to “prove” my position (i.e. analogies A, B, and C do this, therefore Y must do this).  No I explain why Y must do this, and use the analogies A, B, and C to help him view it, not as a reason to why it is.  Like Vizzini, I do not think it means what he thinks it means.

Similarly, my opponent appeals to the UN as a reason to show why Slavery is wrong. I would argue that too is a false equivalence.  The UN is an entity for our modern age, to use it and apply to situations 1000+ years ago is not equivalent. 

But this brings up another good point.  My opponent uses the U.N to say that “Slavery” is wrong.  Again, the U.N. now becomes his yard stick, his “Moral System” that he uses to evaluate “Slavery”.  Let’s analyze this Moral System and see if it passes the GMS sniff test, shall we?
It didn’t take much research to find that sure enough, the U.N. has been inconsistent, by it's own admission (read it's own admission of contradictions on certain things). 
 
https://www.unric.org/en/latest-un-buzz/30960-un-secretary-general-antonio-guterres-at-munich-security-conference
 
Sorry, the U.N. fails the GMS sniff test by being inconsistent.  Remember, this doesn’t leave any room for ifs, ands or buts. 

My opponent though used the U.N. as a Moral System, therefore he must have evaluated it as “good”.  But yet, it’s been deemed “not good” by his own definition….tsk tsk…another inconsistent use of a Moral System. 

Happy camping.  Remember, when being chased by a bear, all you have to do is outrun the other guys!

Round 5
Published:
Sorry I got back late last night and than had school today.

Currently typing this during lunch with 2 hours left.

Obviously I can't type up a proper conclusion paragraph within my 10 minute lunch break so I apologize for not being able to provide one.

- pinkfreud08
Published:
Closing thoughts:
 
1.       Any interpretation of any text carries with it the weighty responsibility of showing that your interpretation is AUTHORITATIVE and CORRECT.  That’s common sense, and we practice this every day.  We don’t just believe whatever someone says about this book, poem, letter, etc if (a) they haven’t read its entirety or (b) pick certain passages and ignore how it relates to the rest of the text and other contexts.
     a.       Anybody can interpret any text (including the Bible).  5 different people can give 5 different interpretations of a text.
     b.      It’s not enough to say “This book teaches/endorses  __________!” , one must also show that this interpretation is correct—that it does indeed teach this.
     c.       I can proclaim “This book endorses SLAVERY!”, but if I am unable to show that my interpretation is the correct interpretation, then the argument (proclamation) holds no weight, it's just an opinion
     d.      My opponent has read the Bible and has thus interpreted it and is proclaiming it endorses Slavery and is Sexist. 
     e.      But he offers no evidence or proof that HIS interpretation is indeed correct.
     f.        He simply cites 1 passage that mentions slavery.
                i.      Does it really make sense to take a very LARGE text, which is composed of several different books, written by several different authors at several different times, and then use one line from book, and ignore others, and proclaim “THIS” is what that text teaches?  No.  We wouldn’t do that with any other work.  We do say that a TEXT (book, letter, poem, etc) and say the entire Text endorses ______ based on 1 line.  And yet this is exactly what my opponent is doing
                ii.      If one passage is sufficient to proclaim this is what the text endorses, then surely my several passages about Jesus are sufficient to state the Bible does not endorse slavery but teaches the opposite.
     g.       Any interpretation of a text must take into account context of the passages, and how it relates to the rest of the text.   We learn this in grade school.  We learn not to interpret a book, a poem, a novel, a letter, etc solely based on 1 or 2 lines found on pages 32, 453, 1069, or wherever.   And yet, this is exactly what my opponent is doing. 
 
 
2.       My opponent is arguing that the Bible should be discarded as a Moral Compass, and the reason for discarding is that it’s inconsistent.  That is the debate.
     a.       My opponent proclaims the Bible endorses slavery.   He doesn’t show successfully show that the Bible endorses slavery (one passage is insufficient to make a broad brush statement about a text), nor does he successfully show it’s inconsistent on what it teaches on slavery
              i.      He cites one passage from Leviticus, and proclaims that it endorses slavery.   He does say it is “inconsistent” with other parts of the Bible, but he doesn’t reference those “other parts” by chapter, verse, etc.”   Had he perhaps referenced other passages by chapter and verse, he might make a case that it does have two different passages saying two different things about slavery.  But if it does, then how can he say it endorses one over the other?  He can’t.   He’s picking and choosing what he wants to deliver a message.
              ii.      So what is he arguing?  That’s inconsistent with itself?  He doesn’t cite evidence, he just says it is.  Is he arguing that the Bible is inconsistent with how we view slavery?  I would agree that particular passage is, but that one passage from Leviticus does not encapsulate the Bible’s overall teaching on slavery and how we are to treat our fellow man (as shown in the passages I cite).
      b.      My opponent proclaims the Bible is Sexist and he cites two passages.  But these passages state the same message, so he is in fact not debating the “internal inconsistency” when it comes to the treatment of women. Instead, he just proclaims the Bible is sexist.
              i.      Like slavery, he doesn’t successfully show that this is the Bible’s overall teaching on how to treat women.  2 passages are not enough to make a broad brush statement that the Bible “teaches” or “endorses” ___________.
              ii.      I cite many more passages that show how the Bible is not sexist, but rather elevates women in ways it doesn’t elevate men. 
             iii.      So he is not arguing it’s inconsistent when it comes to women (again, he cites two passages that say the same thing).  Instead, he is trying to convince us that the Bible is “sexist” based these 2 passages alone
 
3.       What IS my opponent successful in arguing? 
       a.       That his own judgement of Morals Systems is in itself inconsistent (notice how he goes from “there are no 100% consistent moral systems” to ultimately “100% Moral System can be consistent and he  just so happens to have one”).  If his own Moral System is inconsistent, based on his judgement of other Moral Systems, then this would compel him to discard his own Moral System due to inconsistency (his own rules).  Otherwise he’d be violating his own rule for discarding a moral system (that a Moral System which is inconsistent should be discarded).
       b.      He is perhaps interpreting the a text (the Bible) differently than he would other texts.
              i.      If he is in fact interpreting other texts in this same way (i.e. taking 1 or 2 passages and proclaiming this is what it teaches or endorses), then, no disrespect intended, I question his ability to say what this voluminous text teaches or endorses based on 1 passage (Slavery) or 2 passages (treatment of women)
              ii.      But if he is in fact interpreting the Bible differently than he would other texts, this should give us pause.  Why would he interpret it differently—a (conscious or unconscious) bias, maybe?
                              1.       And if this is how he believes that the Bible should be interpreted, based on 1 passage or 2 passages, then he has no basis to deny my counter-claims which are based on many more passages.

Because of this inability to show that the OVERALL TEACHING of the Bible is inconsistent, it's unproven inconsistency is no reason to discard the Bible.  
Added:
--> @Pinkfreud08
"1 Corinthians 14:34-35:"
That's Paul quoting something that the Corinthians originally said to him, which he then refutes. Also, Paul command women to pray and prophecy in the church
"1 Timothy 2:12:"
Paul was responding to a heresy btw.
"This doesn’t excuse the fact that the Bible is still calling wives inferior to their male counterparts."
Have you read Eph 5:25?
#47
Added:
--> @Ramshutu
Appreciate that you took the time to thoroughly read the entire debate and give a detailed vote as this was a pretty long one.
Do you feel there are any gigantic mistakes I made and/or improvements I could make to make my overall arguments better?
Instigator
#46
Added:
Consistency:
Firstly pro appears to argue that con is not showing that the bible is inconsistent - yet he seems to be doing just that.
Secondly, pro argues that we should not be judging the bible against our own standard, that it cannot be assessed as a good standard if compared against our own. This part of the argument had legs (though this whole portion of the debate was very hard to follow)
If pro had doubled down and asked why is it bad to support slavery or sexism- as you can’t judge it agains your own standard- I may have awarded the win; but the argument somewhat Peters out and leaves me dangling on this front.
As a result, pro doesn’t give me much of a reason to object to the slavery or sexism points.
The final aspect is consistency and general - I agree with pro that cons standard was a bit nebulous: but my main issue is that did not appear to be a better one. Cons position throughout mostly appealed to moral contradiction (established) and bad morality like slavery (intuitive), in the absence of pro arguing an acceptable level of contradiction and what standard I should use to measure the morality - I have to weigh it by intuition.
Given that slavery and sexism both appeared to be portrayed either odiously to me, or contradictarly: either way I feel stands against the bible.
As pro does not offer a positive case for himself - this means that arguments go to con.
#45
Added:
Pro goes on to claim that con hasn’t got a
Consistent argument, but pro makes a big error here by pointing out that pro can’t decide which damning indictment of the Bible he wishes to argue. The main problem is that without actually refuting the damning indictments - they are dangling over pros position.
My issue in this point is that the bible as a moral framework stated slavery is okay. While I could accept a change, pro doesn’t give me a good reason as to why it’s okay for a moral framework to claim slavery was okay - even if historically. There’s not enough here for me to give this to pro - even though I think con could have been more specific.
Translation:
Pro begins by claiming that there is a problem with cons context and translational understanding of the bible.
Whilst pro does a good job of convincing me that such errors are easily possible: pro doesn’t actually give examples of con making these errors in context. As a result this whole argument doesn’t add much to the detail. Thus this doesn’t change any of my weighing.
#44
Added:
Sexism: con lists examples of sexism in the bible, where women are expected to be treated in a different, more negative way (such as keeping quiet in church, or being subject to men)
Pros response doesn’t rebut any of the specific claims made. Instead pro merely lists reasons that other parts of the bible are not sexist or exalt woman: the one I found most odd, was that God chose a woman to give birth to Jesus: which was just an odd point - is God found to make a man give birth to Jesus?
Pros last example is odd; as pro appears to confirm the man-head-woman-subservient; but appears to argue this is okay, because the man is required to love the woman.
In the next round con basically points out that the bible is inconsistent - that even if one buys pros case - some parts are sexist some are not is inherently inconsistent.
Pro then argues con has not shown any inconsistency - I don’t get this, as con is pretty explicit. The entire topic is changed up to a discussion about consistency rather than one specifically revolving around what the bible says about sexism
This argument mostly fizzles out; with pro dropping the point to focus on another argument.
Slavery:
Cons case seems fairly self explanatory: that slavery was okay, but is exempted for Israel - making the case that it’s also racist and hypocritical.
Pros response was to simply say that the bible teaches the slavery aspect as history; that there were also rules for treating slaves well, and this were only the rules for the given time.
I don’t think con did as well with this: and mostly doubled down on the contention, without addressing the “different rules”
Portion.
Pro mostly drops these points in the second round to focus on other points: con points out that the bible has two stances on slavery, one accepting and one rejecting.
#43
Added:
--> @PoliceSheep
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>Reported Vote: PoliceSheep// Mod action: [Removed]
>Points Awarded: 3 points to con do arguments, 2 points to pro for sources
>Reason for Decision: I was more convinced by pro and they certainly had better conduct.
Reason for Mod Action>Reason for Mod Action: This vote is not eligible to vote. In order to vote, an account must: (1) Read the site’s COC AND have completed 2 non-troll/non-FF debate OR have 100 forum posts.
The voter should review the site code of conduct for details of what does and does not constitute a valid vote.
*******************************************************************
#42
Added:
--> @PoliceSheep
That's irrelevant, users are still required to give a sufficient vote and are still required to be eligible.
Instigator
#41
Added:
--> @Pinkfreud08
It's open voting.
#40
Added:
--> @PoliceSheep
Firstly you're ineligible to vote and secondly this RFD is insufficient as it doesn't go into enough detail.
Instigator
#39
Added:
Almost 3K into a RFD, and I am undecided. When I've had more sleep I might look over it again. If I score points or not, I'll be sure to leave feedback.
#38
Added:
--> @GuitarSlinger, @Pinkfreud08
Good job guys, I may vote on this. One thing to ask is to make things prettier to look at. These massive text blobs felt like they were attacking my retinas. Although, Pinkfreud was a bit better about it.
#37
Added:
--> @Ramshutu, @oromagi
Only 3 days left!
Instigator
#36
Added:
--> @Ramshutu, @oromagi
I have a long debate for you guys to vote on, I'd appreciate a vote and any way I can improve my arguments.
Instigator
#35
Added:
--> @Pinkfreud08
I see
#34
Added:
--> @Dr.Franklin
Yeah I'm in bay area California
Instigator
#33
#1
Criterion Con Tie Pro Points
Better arguments 3 points
Better sources 2 points
Better spelling and grammar 1 point
Better conduct 1 point
Reason:
https://www.debateart.com/debates/1218/should-the-bible-be-used-as-a-moral-compass?open_tab=comments&comments_page=1&comment_number=43