Instigator / Pro
20
1558
rating
25
debates
64.0%
won
Topic

The Torah allows the eating of pork

Status
Finished

All stages have been completed. The voting points distribution and the result are presented below.

Arguments points
6
6
Sources points
6
6
Spelling and grammar points
4
4
Conduct points
4
2

With 4 votes and 2 points ahead, the winner is ...

K_Michael
Parameters
More details
Publication date
Last update date
Category
Religion
Time for argument
One week
Voting system
Open voting
Voting period
One month
Point system
Four points
Rating mode
Unrated
Characters per argument
10,000
Contender / Con
18
1596
rating
42
debates
63.1%
won
Description
~ 48 / 5,000

It's all in the title. My reasoning is surprise.

Added:
--> @K_Michael

Instead of focusing on leviticus. Take a look at deuteronomy 12:15,21-22
what is acceptable for offering vs eating

Added:

I have a question: How is this book written? And how do we obey them? Like no matter how dirty the beef is we can eat it, and no matter how clean the pork is we can't eat it? WHAT?

Added:
Instigator
--> @Alec

Gotcha. It's unrated, so no big deal.

Added:
Contender
--> @K_Michael

My parents won't let me access DART too much, so posting stuff is hard.

Added:

pro stated: "...pigs chew cud by the definition of the Torah. Unfortunately, pigs aren't ruminants."

Now that round 1 is complete. let's clear the air. Pigs are not ruminants, confirmed. However, there is no confusion over the definition of "cud." What the raw material happens to be is of no consequence; grass or some other vegetation. "Cud" is any vegetation consumed that is literally regurgitated to the mouth to be re-chewed. According to the OED: "Rumination: 2.a. The action of chewing the cud; the chewing by a herbivorous animal of partially digested food from the rumen." According to the same source: "Rumen: The first and largest stomach of a ruminant, in which food (esp. cellulose) is partly digested by bacteria, and from which it may pass back to the mouth as cud for further chewing, or on into the reticulum."
Given that the Torah stipulated two conditions: cloven hoof AND chewing cud [rumination], and that both must be met, it doesn't matter that pigs eat grass, in addition to just about everything else, eating grass, alone, is not descriptive of rumination; therefore, pigs do not meet the Torah's prohibition against non-cud chewers.

Added:
Contender
--> @K_Michael

I'm in.

Added:
Instigator
--> @Alec

Unrated now.

Added:
Contender
--> @K_Michael

Make the debate unrated, and I might accept.

Added:
Contender
--> @David

Interested?