Was Brown vs Board of Education a mistake?

Topic's posts

Posts in total: 30

--> @TheRealNihilist
My rephrasing would be If I agree there are differences not biologically but before they enter the classroom is it worth integrating people of other races?

Okay. Well my answer to that would be yes. I see no justification for the increased financial costs of segregation, not to mention the obvious moral concerns.
--> @Discipulus_Didicit
Okay. Well my answer to that would be yes. I see no justification for the increased financial costs of segregation, not to mention the obvious moral concerns.
I don't think he will care about your morality since he would say something like this and that is probably the main reason he is opposed to it. I am bunching his feelings and morality together. 

Yes, it was. Brown vs. The Board of Education was a means of ingratiating so called "black" students into the "public" public school system--which is pretty much a network of detention centers, and indoctrination camps. In said public school systems, not only are so called "black" children conditioned and exposed to so called "white," predominantly female authorities, but they're fed with false narratives especially about their history. Integration erodes indigenous cultures, and that hasn't bode well for so called "black" demographics in the United States.
20 days later
I'll note, first, the Brown v. Board of Education [1954] was a unanimous 9-0 decision by the Warren Court and, second, that 9-0 decisions number as the most plurality decision of the Court over the last 150 years since a 9-justiceCourt was established in 1869. No other ratio of decisions has a greater plurality. In fact, in the last 50 years, the Court has settled cases with unanimous decisions 59% of the time; a clear majority. So much for the political bias argument the Court is often accused of having, regardless of subject matter.  
Brown v Board of Education was chiefly an argument over the established "separate but equal" condition that found precedent in Plessy v Furguson [1896], in which Plessy, a person who was 7/8 white, and therefore deemed black [go figure!], sat in a white trolley car, marked as such, when the law demanded that he sit in a car marked for blacks. Being 7/8 white, what do you think Plessy looked like? Google him; there's a photo of the man. You decide. The argument was that each car was equal in every respect relative to its facilities, thus meeting "separate but equal" conditions. That argument died with Furguson by the simple argument that the designating signs, themselves declared inequality. Brown v. Board of Education was not at all wrong. The entire decision-making process was made, not by legal mumbo-jumbo argument, but argument of common sense so the people would understand it more fully.


--> @Christen
Keep the visual learners in one group, the auditory learners in another, and the kinesthetic learners in another.
Assuming none of those can change (I don't know what style I'm in), I like this idea.