hay alguien que hable espanol aqui?

Topic's posts
Posts in total: 59
solo soy curioso 
--> @Wrick-It-Ralph
i do not speak Spanish but i can understand some of it because i was in a Spanish immersion class for my first few years of grade school for me its a lot easier to understand it written then spoken
--> @dave2242
Same here.  spoken Spanish is more difficult if the person I'm talking to isn't talking slowly.  One thing I noticed is that if you go out of your way to think about what they're saying, it will mess you up and it's better to just let the whole sentence flow into your ears and you'll be surprised how fast your brain will translate some of it.  

This obviously doesn't help with subtle phrases.  But it helps pick out the big complicated words. 
--> @Wrick-It-Ralph
I know a little bit.
--> @Alec
nice
--> @Alec, @dave2242
Espero que huya mas hablantes de espanol en aqui. :) 
--> @Wrick-It-Ralph
This is without Translate:

Are you saying, "I am happy you can speak Spanish here".  I prefer not to do it because of this link:


--> @Alec
I said "I wish that there was more Spanish speakers in here."  Not an exact translate because I had to move the words around, but it would sound funny if I said it with Spanish grammar. 

I'm not sure why you don't like multiculturalism.  Every culture is multicultural if you think about it.  Each person brings their own culture and it changes over time.  Sending immigrants away also has nothing to do with culture, that has to do with race. 
--> @Wrick-It-Ralph
I think assimilating the Hispanics completely is necessary to help prevent separatist movements in the future.
--> @Alec
Oh I see.  You think they should assimilate to American culture, that makes more sense.  


Well you do realize that assimilation just happens right?  Also, some of their culture will sit with us.  I don't really care about cultures but I'm not a fan of social constructs.  I don't equate it to race though.  

Even if you believe this, there's not reason to reject Spanish.  You're taking it to the next level when you do that.  I can appreciate Spanish without appealing to culture and having a culture is not wrong.  It's only wrong if you make a group identity out of it and impose it in a bigoted way. 


--> @Wrick-It-Ralph
Well you do realize that assimilation just happens right?
To an extent it does.  If the US has open borders (which I think is inevitable due to some far left democrat taking Trump's place) then people would have less incentive to assimilate in the US especially if unassiliminated Hispanics make up an overwhelming majority of people in urban areas.  I imagine areas that dominate with unassiliminated immigrants would want to break away to join Mexico or Cuba or become their own independent country if they are too numerous and not willing to assimilate within American society.  In the 1850s or so, Mexico encouraged US settlers to come to Mexico and they failed to assiliminate the immigrants.  Next thing you know, Texas and California want to break away to join the US.  When you don't assiliminate immigrants, you lose territory.

I can appreciate Spanish without appealing to culture and having a culture is not wrong.
It's not wrong, just dangerous in the case of Spanish when the US could break up on culture differences.  The Brazilian immigrants for example, don't have the numbers to break away anywhere in the country.  The Chinese immigrants, same story.  If you have a job, I'm fine with you staying whether or not you know English if your culture doesn't have the ability to break away or isn't predicted too.  Just not that way for Hispanics.

It's only wrong if you make a group identity out of it and impose it in a bigoted way. 
If unassiliminated immigrants make up a majority of the population in any state or territory, there will be people that make a group identity out of it and would want to break away.  Many in Puerto Rico(PR) for example, want to break away to form their own freely associated state because of their "distinct culture".  In other words, they are Hispaniphones.  If they assimilated, then they would not only not want to break away, but they might become a state by now and their .

I propose on assimilating PR by sending 2 million consenting Puerto Ricans to the US and by sending 2 million consenting Anglophone americans to PR so the ones in the US assimilate quickly and the Americans in PR, since they would outnumber the remaining Puerto ricans, at worst, this creates a bilingual island.  At best, the Puerto Ricans assimilate to the other Americans, making the country united and making PR a state almost immediately after this happens due to them being more American.

P.S. Are you Hispanic?
--> @secularmerlin
what's wrong with having Hispanics in our country?  We're all the children of immigrants. 



If you're calling Spanish dangerous, then I'm not sure that this conversation will end up being productive, because I just cannot see a reality where that is true even if I shamelessly stretch it. 



Well group identities isn't a mexico problem, it's a world problem.  Pretty much everybody does it.  My problem with this argument is that it logically always has to fall on either xenophobia or racism.  Those are fallacious foundations for an argument. 


--> @Wrick-It-Ralph
I don't know how secularmerlin is in this conversation.

Anyways:

what's wrong with having Hispanics in our country?
I didn't say that.  I said having unassiliminated ones can cause the country to break up as history has confirmed.

My argument is not racist.  Mexico, another nation of immigrants probably doesn't let you be a citizen of that country unless you know Spanish although I don't know if it is true.  Even if it isn't, very few Americans are actually moving to Mexico.

We're all the children of immigrants. 
Yes.  However our ancestors never had the numbers to break away to form their own countries.  The 1st generation tended to assimilate to some extent before and after arriving in the US.  Intercultural marriage (For example, a Polish person marrying an Italian) was very common within the US and when it was, the children tended to feel more American then any other culture.  As a result, they didn't break away.  I personally think I have 4 ethnicities in me and I don't feel Italian or Maltese.  I'm American.  I can't effectively break away.  The same applies with most other ethnicities.  The Chinese won't break away to form their own country within the US.  The Chinese at least for right now can keep their culture.  Same with other ethnicities.  This applies to even Brazilians, who are pretty similar to Hispanics.  They don't have the ability to form their own countries.  However, the Hispanics are a unified force of around 75 million, and their culture is pretty prominent in the South west.

If they don't assimilate, we might lose the south west to Mexico.  The president of Mexico has said that there are 100 million Mexicans in Mexico and 23 million in the US.  He said they were united.  I don't want to give the South west to Mexico.

If you wish to comment further, there is a whole forum for this in the link below:


--> @Alec
My mistake. 

No, they do not force you to speak Spanish in Mexico.  The breakdown you're speaking of is a cultural one.  Who cares?  Is a culture more important than people?  No.  People are more important.  Get some perspective.  You're talking about making a bunch of people suffer just so you can have America the way you want.  You don't see how that's immoral?
--> @Wrick-It-Ralph
 Is a culture more important than people?
How is Hispanics preserving their language even important?  They can learn it if they want to, but what's the point in speaking it if they know English?  How are people even being threatened in your example?

You're talking about making a bunch of people suffer just so you can have America the way you want. 
How are they suffering?  Most Hispanics in this country are bilingual.  Telling them to speak English in this nation isn't significant suffering.  If they want to stay bilingual, they can speak their language at home, where the rate of separatist movement development is minimized.  They can communicate to tourists.  They can learn the language publicly if they want.  But just speaking it with your friends because you value your culture, their culture isn't Mexican or Guatemalan.  It's American since they are US citizens living in America.

--> @Wrick-It-Ralph
Um hi. In general I am against anything that divides people. That is my knee jerk reaction anyway.
--> @secularmerlin
I accidentally tagged you.  But since you're here.  Are you saying that you're in favor of assimilation and if you don't like division, I'm guessing that you don't like border control then right? 
--> @Alec
How is Hispanics preserving their language even important?  They can learn it if they want to, but what's the point in speaking it if they know English?  How are people even being threatened in your example?

For the same reason you want to preserve English.  If it doesn't matter, then why do you care? 


How are they suffering?  Most Hispanics in this country are bilingual.  Telling them to speak English in this nation isn't significant suffering.
That's a violation of the 1st amendment.  Do you not agree with the 1st amendment? 



--> @Wrick-It-Ralph
For the same reason you want to preserve English.
Apart from the fact that English has more use in the USA (for national and international communication) I want to preserve the national sovereignty of the USA.  To do this, we need one unifying language.  This means that I don't want Mexico taking the land of the US that is hispaniphone majority like how Russia took the Ukrainian land that was Russian majority.

That's a violation of the 1st amendment.  Do you not agree with the 1st amendment? 
I think the 1st amendment should protect freedom of political expression within the USA.  There are off topic reasons to support this claim such as applying a consistent code to where there would be no necessary exceptions such as yelling bob on an airplane or yelling fire in a crowded movie theater.  The punishment for speaking Spanish outside of what I would call the legal parameters wouldn't be big either, just a slight deterrent (I'm suggesting just a pinch or something).

Interesting how you don't seem to care if there is a separatist movement within the US over the culture differences that might be in our future since you have dropped that point.
--> @Wrick-It-Ralph
I dont know. I haven't given it much thought other than that acceptance is in my opinion generally superior to division.
--> @Wrick-It-Ralph
Yo hablo Espanol pequeno. Yo aprendido para 8 anos en la clase de Espanol. Yo enseno la vocubalaria buneo, pero, yo necesito para improva mi impredito, predito, y otras formas de verbas
--> @Alec
You're arguing to take away the thing from Hispanics that you also want for americans.  Your argument is a contradiction.  

Btw, Spanish is the most spoken language on the internet.  Wrap your mind around that for a second. 
--> @SupaDudz
ya veo.  aye entonces necesitas dos cosas.  primero: estudiar gramatica y Segundo: estudiar conjutivos (el Segundo es muy importante)
--> @SupaDudz
also.  it's me enseno (I taught to myself)  if you do something it's "yo"  if you do something TO yourself then it's "me" (it's called reflexive)
--> @SupaDudz
you're pretty good for teaching yourself honestly.  You know the words, but I can tell you don't know the native phrases yet.  LIke when you say "for 8 years"   There's two things here. 

1.  it's "por" not "para" 

2 natives don't say it that way


3.  They say "it makes 8 years that I did X or hace ocho anos que estudie espanol"

The native phrases are always tricky like this