Discrimination in school

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Posts in total: 32
--> @Outplayz
I have two degrees and am doing pretty well. I think that's all that matters. Of course, depending on what a person is going for however. In my case, i didn't need to be the top of my class... i needed to socialize and get connections. It all depends on the goal which i think can be achieved through public school. 

May you perhaps be a bit more detailed? I'd like see you inform how the experience you described led to acquiring two degrees. (You don't have to mention which degrees; I'd only like to get a better picture on how your public school experience produced this effect.)

Life is like the chaos found in public school, but hidden. People hide who they are as they grow... those impulses are not controlled in HS years so you get to see the wide range of differences. I don't think people that are home-schooled lack a social life... i think they would lack seeing these differences.
And how is experiencing these differences significant toward: (1) education, and (2) their life? And would it be fair to state that your outlook on life is one which concludes chaos because you assimilated to chaos when growing up? And wouldn't those who assimilated to a consistent order and structure seek such an environment later in life?

I don't think you are understanding my angle. Individuality as in a goth kid dressing up goth. Trust me, as a goth, skater, surfer kid myself... that never goes away. I'm still that person but i hide it bc i'm an "adult" now. Kids in these years don't hide it and let themselves be known. Public school is a great time to see this individuality.
That's not individuality; that's affiliating with a category. And I disagree that being an adult means being less individual. It all depends on how important one's individuality is to the individual. For example, I'm Athias in all contexts. My demeanor remains for the most part unchanged whether that be online, associating with my friends, and family, or associating with others in my employment. (I am more jovial around my friends and family.)


The way you are talking about home-schooling is very controlling.

No, it actually isn't. All I said about homeschooling thus far is that it's better because it allows the parent to oversee in full capacity the child's education. I quoted "control" to mirror your lexicon. It's no more controlling than ceding the education of one's child to the state.

You're kid will never see a skinhead and get the opportunity to observe or even talk to them to see where they are coming from. I was never a skinhead, dressed like people they disliked, and am a different ethnicity.
What benefit would it serve my child to observe and interact with a skinhead?

But, still i found a way to become friends with them and see that they are people too. Even uncomfortable at the beginning bc i thought they'd hate me. It's little things like this you are hiding them away from.

What benefit does this serve? Can they not experience meeting a diverse sample of people outside of public school?

Now... the important part is i asked people i trust what does "skinhead" mean. I knew what they stood for and who they were before trying to make friends. I knew i disagreed with them. That is the preparation i'm talking about that you need so you don't get brainwashed or manipulated... that's important too.
I still don't understand. Are you assuming one's children would prejudiced without the experience of public school? If one oversees their children's education, where would they learn this prejudice?


This is a very broad statement and not nuanced at all. There are situations in which i may agree with you... like i first said, it all comes down to the kids goals. If they want to be musicians, i'd say go to public school. If they want to be effective salesman / business, i'd say go to public school. If the kid wants to be a doctor from a prestige school, i'd say get home schooled. It all depends on the future goals.

I'm curious: how does public school benefit a music career better than homeschool? Of course, feel free to be opinionated.

I'm not saying home schooling is bad, i actually think it may get you better grades. But even there i'm not sure... i think if one an still crush it in public school with all the distractions, that's a talent within itself. 
It's not impossible to, as you say, "crush it" in public school. However, that's more about the child than the environment.

So, i disagree with a general statement that home-schooling is "better." That's just not the case in every situation. 
General statements do not speak to every situation. I cannot presume to know each result of every form of education. Conversely, you too cannot state that public schooling in every instance produces the effect of which you speak. So we are both being general. Would you still consider generality an apt criticism of my arguments?
--> @Athias
May you perhaps be a bit more detailed?
I would be cautious in saying that public school is what helped me get my degrees. I think that was more my own will than public school. It's what public school taught me that i applied to my careers that is more important. I don't think i would have been the top sales/business person in my state without my experiences in public school. Without boasting too much... i live in a pretty large state, Cali, and worked in the hardest area to sell in... and i was top ten, top 3 a couple times, in the entire state in a big company. People asked me how i do what i do? It really came down to understanding people. It takes me 5 minutes or less of conversation to know that side people hide. Also, since i observed a lot before making friends... i also learned how different people made non-verbal signs that i can pick up on too. Lastly, learning all these different people are still awesome... i have no judgments before meeting people so everyone is an open book... it's made me truly love humanity. I do not think i would be this way if i didn't experience it... but who knows since that wasn't my path. All i know is if there were sellers in my company that were home schooled, i was destroying them. And this is just one job. 

And wouldn't those who assimilated to a consistent order and structure seek such an environment later in life?
No.. i don't think so. I think everyone is an individual. Some are random and chaotic, some are more structured. There are degrees within everyone. I'm very detail oriented. Although i may be random, i still have order in that randomness. It's just who i am. But, i suspect if i never experienced this chaos... i wouldn't know how to order it as well as i do now. It's hard since we are talking about things that weren't my path. Would i be the same? Maybe... but, i think i'm better, just like you get better at everything, with practice. 

My demeanor remains for the most part
I'm very much the same. I don't hide part of myself and am an open book. I like people like you bc i feel more at ease right away usually meeting someone like you. But i've met a lot of people... not everyone is like you. As to the affiliating with a category part... who doesn't? But here is the thing i think you may be missing. Seeing these categorize in the open, without them being hidden... helps a lot in understand that certain category. Take ten teens that are being their category... and stand them next to ten adults in suits. If you can vision how different that is in understand the person, you'll get what i mean. 

 parent to oversee in full capacity the child's education.
This is controlling by its nature. I'm not saying it's a bad thing. I'm just saying i have an issue with "it's better" ... i do not agree in "all situations." I concede that in some it may be, but i think there are cons to homeschooling you may not be considering... or have you. What would you say the cons are to home schooling? 

What benefit would it serve my child to observe and interact with a skinhead? 
It's a teenager man... they likely have no clue what they are doing, and i found out.. they were just rebels. They're humans. Misguided sometimes. I actually helped one of the girls see the errors she was making, got her off drugs, and became very close friends. That is a talent, a skill, you learn when you don't judge off appearances. I knew they were wrong, but at that age... i was curious to find out what they truly believed bc i was taught to not judge and just listen. Can i ask... were you home schooled?

Can they not experience meeting a diverse sample of people outside of public school? 
Yes you can. But these are formative years. Also, the environment is what it is. This environment changes as teens age into adults. Of course, people still show to an extent what i'm talking about in college/university... but it's just a whole different environment. It's harder to do what's easier to do in public schools. What i'm talking about is i got to see this transformation instead of missing it completely.  

I still don't understand. 
Preparation just means knowledge. I had young adults teach me what to expect, i had adults that i can talk to freely about what's going on. I wasn't going around without knowing. With this knowledge i just knew the bad things to look out for... but i was also taught to explore different people and label things bad once i came to that conclusion after listening to them. That's the gist of it, this was an ongoing part. 

I'm curious: how does public school benefit a music career better than homeschool?
Simply bc i had the opportunity to play with a wide variety of people i would have never met if it was up to me to choose who to play with. This is nuanced too... i played in bands, homeschooling may be better for a concert pianist. Think of this as music genres. If you love rock, you'll likely never listen to rap unless someone that does introduces you to it, but more importantly... guide you through understand what they love about it. 

that's more about the child than the environment. 
This is an important statement that i agree with. That's why i wouldn't say either or is "better" ... each has it's pros and cons. So to your last statement.. i'm trying not to be general, sorry if i was. It really comes down to the person. All i'm saying is there are certain situations that can teach you a little more than you would have learned if you didn't experience it. This why i can't say which is better in general. 
--> @Dr.Franklin
Yep.

The slow creep of Left Wing Fascism. It's happening here in the U.K. too. 

Students are admonished, simply for having an opinion.

We used to refer to it as freedom of speech or freedom of expression, but the tyranny of political correctness is putting pay to all that.

--> @Dr.Franklin
Professor Michael Thompson also talks extensively about how the social norms that boys are exposed to, the need to be cool, manly, strong, and others; are raising generations of boys that end up being and lonely: which i suspect is possibly part of reason why suicide and drug abuse disproportionately affect males.

In Raising Cain, the professor went into a lot of detail about the importance of the emotions education of boys in school and how it’s lack plays a big part the overall lack of emotional well being in men growing up.


Secondly; having a small child of my own, I am excruciatingly aware of the inherent gender bias in almost every aspect of life from the moment you are born. From language, to clothing to the close they’re given.

If boys are given cars and LEGO and encourage to build things: and girls are given dolls and are told to take care of them: and are discouraged from doing the opposite - is it any surprise that boy end up being better at, say, spatial awareness? It appears at least meta studies seem to back this up.

Even little things; studies have shown parents talk more to girls, and count more with boys - so it’s difficult to really sepearate what boys naturally are from what they have been taught to be.


I think the issue with school is that they are becomming more diruption and risk intolerant. Meaning less cool games, and more reliant on drastic intervention to solve education problems: not solving the root cause of whatever behavioural problem maybe Driving suspension and expulsion.  There are also idiot teachers who grotesquely interact.



--> @Ramshutu
Professor Michael Thompson also talks extensively about how the social norms that boys are exposed to, the need to be cool, manly, strong, and others; are raising generations of boys that end up being and lonely: which i suspect is possibly part of reason why suicide and drug abuse disproportionately affect males.
I suspect that the exposure to the need of being "cool, manly, and strong" creates a sense of loneliness because this behavior and/or exhibited traits have recently been stigmatized. Boys are no less social beings, so marginalizing them as "toxic" (toxic masculinity) will take its toll.

In Raising Cain, the professor went into a lot of detail about the importance of the emotions education of boys in school and how it’s lack plays a big part the overall lack of emotional well being in men growing up.
That's not a school's responsibility; that's a parent's responsibility. Nowadays, the public school system is nothing more than glorified daycare allowing some parents to often shirk their responsibilities.

Secondly; having a small child of my own, I am excruciatingly aware of the inherent gender bias in almost every aspect of life from the moment you are born. From language, to clothing to the close they’re given.
One's sex primarily indicates one's role in reproduction. And sex as a means to reproduction is therefore very important in social interaction. So it's no surprise that these nuances manifest in the form of bias.

If boys are given cars and LEGO and encourage to build things: and girls are given dolls and are told to take care of them: and are discouraged from doing the opposite - is it any surprise that boy end up being better at, say, spatial awareness? It appears at least meta studies seem to back this up.

Even little things; studies have shown parents talk more to girls, and count more with boys - so it’s difficult to really sepearate what boys naturally are from what they have been taught to be.
Is it? If one is going to speak to some nebulous culture which teaches boys and girls to adopt artificially created roles, then one has to ask: who or what created this culture? Was it one person? Was it a group of people? How did it come to be? Could it be that this culture is "natural"? That is these constellations of gender-based behaviors reflect biological imperative (e.g. a woman being more selective in choosing mates because her reproductive prospects are heavily influenced by the amount of eggs she has and her gestational terms.)

I think the issue with school is that they are becomming more diruption and risk intolerant. Meaning less cool games, and more reliant on drastic intervention to solve education problems: not solving the root cause of whatever behavioural problem maybe Driving suspension and expulsion.  There are also idiot teachers who grotesquely interact.
I agree in some part. Though, I think one of the primary issues affecting boys in public school is the blatant attempt to "feminize" not only the social environments, but also the academic standards.



19 days later
--> @Dr.Franklin
I also feel that boys are being discriminated in schools, the entire problem was probably caused by the fact that most teachers are girls. So, the teachers think that their race is superior to the boys.
--> @Gatorade
Agree