Tejretics's avatar

Tejretics

A member since
1
4
8

Statistics

Debates
4
Won
2
Lost
1
Tied
1
Win ratio
62.5%
Rating
1,518
Debate votes
12
Debate comments
124
Forum topics
33
Forum posts
356

Personal information

Gender
Male
Birthday
Country
India
Native language
English
Education
High school
Life's priority
Other
Religion
Atheism
Political ideology
Liberalism
Occupation
Student
Income
Unknown

About me

DDO account: https://www.debate.org/tejretics/

Hi! I’m Tejretics and I’m a nineteen-year-old college student. I joined DART in 2018, and was the site’s Voting Moderator for a few months.

I joined DDO as a thirteen-year-old in early 2015 (and reached #7 on the DDO leaderboard in late 2016, where I’ve stayed since, in addition to being on the DDO Hall of Fame). Many of the things I've said on DDO are ignorant (and in many cases, not very kind) and I'd love to take back a lot of it. However, DDO changed my life in some pretty fundamental ways, and made me a better person.

I am introverted (though I am trying to develop better social skills), curious about how the world works, and committed to doing as much good for those in need as I can. I value compassion in people a lot. My MBTI type is INTP-T. I like alternative rock music (though I also enjoyed Taylor Swift’s two recent albums), reading blogs and browsing Twitter, and thinking about economics. I also have some formal debate experience, mainly in the World Schools and British Parliamentary formats, and a bit of the Australs format as well, that I’ve thoroughly enjoyed.

In terms of my worldview, I’m a moral realist. I believe in applying some simple tenets of common-sense morality to get at other, more controversial moral principles. In general, that leads me to some form of consequentialism that respects people regardless of where or even when they live. Hence, I think people outside your nation, future generations, and animals have substantial moral value, and we should seriously consider how our actions affect them. I’m undecided about whether to be neutral about the creation of happy lives (i.e., whether I take totalist views of population ethics seriously).

As for politics, I’m largely a liberal. I favor relatively free markets and economic globalization, combined with high urbanization, extensive social safety nets (typically through cash transfers and voucher-based programs, but also some state services), and – in developing countries – limited, careful industrial policy to promote export-oriented manufacturing. I’m fairly hawkish on counterterrorism measures, wary about the rise of China as a global power, in favor of substantial amounts of well-targeted foreign aid (especially from developed countries), and tend to (though not always) be against military intervention against foreign governments (such as the U.S.’s actions in Iraq and Libya). I also support banning factory farming, strict animal welfare laws, and efforts to tackle the risk of major global catastrophes (such as from pandemics, nuclear war, climate change, and advanced artificial intelligence). For example, I favor banning gain-of-function research and increasing funding for the Biological Weapons Convention, introducing an Existential Threat Policy for nuclear weapons use and expanding bans on nuclear testing, and substantial subsidies for clean energy and green tech R&D coupled with carbon taxes.

I hold broadly liberal positions on social issues. I’m a feminist and social egalitarian, believe in a more humane prison system which prioritizes crime prevention over incarceration (by solving structural issues like poverty, decriminalizing many nonviolent crimes like drug use and sex work, and prioritizing police over prisons), am in favor of affirmative action (there is evidence that caste-based affirmative action has reduced inequality in intergenerational mobility in India, for example), and support protections for civil liberties (though I’m fine with sacrificing privacy for security in many cases). However, I oppose bans on hate speech, and am skeptical of some elements of modern social justice advocacy, especially in high-income liberal democracies (such as the focus on issues of language and symbolism like cultural appropriation rather than structural problems, the value placed on ideological purity rather than efficacy, and some worrying limits on free speech).