So, a woman who identified as a man.

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Then goes on to conceive and give birth, whilst still vehemently claiming their right to male identity.

Hypocrisy, stupidity, comedy or what?


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Stupidity and hypocrisy
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comedy
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stupidity, comedy
basic biology says males produce sperm, females eggs, both together = conception.  the end.
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Hello, trans woman here.

A man giving birth is neither stupidity nor hypocrisy nor comedy. It's not stupidity: ask any trans person, we are painfully aware of the gender assigned to us at birth. It's not hypocrisy: gender is a spectrum. And it's not comedy: it's just someone living their life.

I've been on a dialectics kick, so let's start with the idea that
basic biology says males produce sperm, females eggs, both together = conception.  the end.
I am sure that you agree that because some people are infertile, some males do not produce sperm, and some females do not produce eggs. The alternative would be to argue that infertile males and females are different sexes or genders from fertile males and females, which is probably not a fertile plain of argument.

So, what exactly delineates a sex or a gender? I'll anticipate one probable response:
basic biology says males have xy chromosomes and females have xx chromosomes
The problem now is that these categories don't contain all humans. There are 1) humans with extra chromosomes, 2) humans with both chromosomes, and so on. On top of that, there are 3) humans who have the chromosomes associated with one sex but the secondary sex characteristics of the other sex. So, this definition is clearly inadequate as well. How would you account for the three examples I've listed in a definition of sex or gender?
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some males do not produce sperm, and some females do not produce eggs.
humans with extra chromosomes,

those are abnormalities, birth or other defects so....
if you'd like to say trans people are abnormal I would agree with that, but to say one can claim to have male dna and sex organs, or female if you like, which ever they were not born with,  just isn't possible.
changing or attempting to change outward physical appearance is just that, changing to something it was not originally.

do you deny that xx chromosome is a male?  you can't change that.  again trying to alter physical appearances doesn't make you what you have attempted to emulate, it's fake.

females have evolved and are physically designed to carry babies.

saying a "man" gave birth is stupidity, hypocrisy or comedy. 

You are free to play whatever role you wish, I don't really care, but it is a role just like an actor pretending to be something or someone they are not.  If that makes you happy, good for you, but don't expect or demand I accept the charades.

do you have a clitoris?  you do not because that is a female physical trait they are born with, barring any abnormalities, obviously there are many other female only parts that you could never have.  So you are still a male acting/pretending to be a female, which is fine, I don't care how you live your life, I really don't, just don't expect me to go along with it.  You will never, ever have to worry about cervical cancer, you'd never need a pap smear, but rather a prostate check.
Blair White is the closest I've seen that could really pass, and yes he/she makes an attractive looking female (he/she is very smart too)  But he/she also will never have all those things I've talked about.  But how he/she lives isn't my concern until or if it involves me somehow.
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Transgenderism is stupid, YOU ARE A MAn
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If you have no y chromosomes, you are a woman. If you have any y chromosomes, you are a man. End of story.
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those are abnormalities, birth or other defects so....
if you'd like to say trans people are abnormal I would agree with that . . . 
You've touched on an interesting point here. That is, that people who are born intersex are not "normal". Does this mean people who are born that way have bodies that are wrong and we should try to "fix" them? Here's an article that talks about the horrific practice of performing surgeries on intersex children, essentially mutilating their bodies so that they fit in the binary male/female categories.

What gives these strict categories of male/female normative force? It is clearly not because they are ideal forms, and they don't even describe the world accurately, as we've seen they can't account for the "abnormalities".

If an intersex person identified as female and asked you to use she/her pronouns, and she had both sets of sex organs, what would you do?

And here's the punchline: while there's still lots more research to do, studies suggest that the brains of transgender individuals on average tend to resemble an average brain of the gender with which they identify.

 
do you deny that xx chromosome is a male?  you can't change that.  again trying to alter physical appearances doesn't make you what you have attempted to emulate, it's fake.
Well, xy is what is generally correlated with assigning someone as male. Here's another question: in light of the fact that chromosomes do not necessarily decide secondary or even primary sex characteristics, why do chromosomes determine one's gender as male or female?

You are free to play whatever role you wish, I don't really care, but it is a role just like an actor pretending to be something or someone they are not.  If that makes you happy, good for you, but don't expect or demand I accept the charades.
This isn't an uncommon view in most of the world. I appreciate that you respect my personal liberties despite a quite fundamental difference in how we both see me.

Here's another interesting thought, this idea about playing a role. Gender has some element of performance to it. The idea that "boys should like blue and pirates, girls should like pink and princesses" is probably familiar to you. There's all sorts of expectations, from the way we dress to the way we speak to how we handle relationships. These ideas are everywhere. In fact, it's not uncommon for trans women to go hyper-masculine before coming to terms with their female gender and transitioning, and for trans men to go hyper-feminine. The rationale behind that is generally something like "maybe I'm just not a manly enough man yet, and if I were just more masculine I'd be okay with it." This is the case for many trans women who've gone into the armed forces only to later transition.

It seems to me that in a case like the above, it's acting like the gender that you're assigned at birth that's a charade.
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If you have no y chromosomes, you are a woman. If you have any y chromosomes, you are a man. End of story.
One major question raised by my posts thus far: why do chromosomes determine your sex or your gender?
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Basic physiology determines gender, and the uncorrupted definition of gender is simply "either of the two sexes, male or female".

And yes, very rarely physiological abnormalities can occur during foetal development. 

Though, the current social preponderance regarding gender issues, is not about developmental abnormalities but rather about postnatal               socio-psychological issues.

Nonetheless, all of this is a secondary discussion which has developed from a simple premise. Whereby the oftentimes hypocritical and nonsensical nature of ultra right wing liberal, so called "transgender" justification, becomes patently obvious.

And just for the record, I have no interest or concern whatsoever regarding who of what sex does what with someone else of whatever sex, and similarly I have no concern or interest in what any individual chooses to with their own body.

I would suggest though, that it would be far better if such people quit bombarding the rest with hypocritical and nonsensical justifications and got on with their sexual and bodily preoccupations in private.

And furthermore, the actual person that was referred to in the first place was unequivocally a woman, gender female. As proven by their obvious physiological ability to conceive and give birth.



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Basic physiology determines gender, and the uncorrupted definition of gender is simply "either of the two sexes, male or female".
What's "basic physiology"? Going by the consensus of the scientific community, which is as basic as it gets, gender and sex are both widely recognized as a spectrum. Does basic physiology mean, "what I think physiology should mean, as my definition is superior to the one of those who actually study it?" If so, why? If your answer is something about scientific bias, back that up.
And yes, very rarely physiological abnormalities can occur during foetal development. 

Though, the current social preponderance regarding gender issues, is not about developmental abnormalities but rather about postnatal socio-psychological issues.
One point I've been trying to make is that these "abnormalities" betray problems with the categories themselves. It's not enough to say "there's male and female, and anyone else... eh." What gives the binary categories of male and female any force? They don't accurately reflect at least 1% of the population (common estimate of how many people are intersex), and that's without considering the other ways in which sex and gender are messy concepts. Yes, 1% sounds like a small number. But that's 3 million Americans. Any theory of sex or gender that wants to reflect the world has to account for this, and it's not enough to say, "everyone's male or female except for a few people that aren't". It's not enough because it papers over the flaws in the categories that are exposed. People are attempting to give the layperson view of male and female normative force, and it's odd to elevate to a universal a principle that is obviously not universal.

The common view has its places, as people in the male and female binary are more common, and overwhelmingly more visible, and the categories of male and female are useful in some contexts. But it's nowhere near the end of the conversation.

Nonetheless, all of this is a secondary discussion which has developed from a simple premise. Whereby the oftentimes hypocritical and nonsensical nature of ultra right wing liberal, so called "transgender" justification, becomes patently obvious.
It's not a secondary discussion, and hopefully that becomes more clear as this conversation develops. I still have yet to see hypocrisy or nonsense.

I would suggest though, that it would be far better if such people quit bombarding the rest with hypocritical and nonsensical justifications and got on with their sexual and bodily preoccupations in private.
Sexuality and gender are different things. Trans people can be gay, straight, bi, ace, or any other sexual orientation. 

As far as privacy goes, there are a multitude of reasons why these conversations need to be had. Here's a few:

  1. Historically, portrayal of trans people in the media has been so bad that it has gotten people killed. The common narrative of "traps" is directly harmful to me and other trans people, and so we're taking our part in the conversation, to show that we're not fetishists, we're not crazy, we're just people.
  2. The rights of trans people to live their lives in peace, to "get on" with their lives, are violated in numerous ways. There have been laws passed and harsh debate about our right to use the bathroom without getting harassed. Disproportionately high numbers of trans youth are homeless. Employers can discriminate against trans people without much fear of reprisal. Conversion therapy increases the suicide rate, while acceptance and access to medical care substantially reduce it. Trans people are far more likely to be sexually assaulted in prison. They are victimized in various crimes at far higher rates, are generally more impoverished, and some are forced into sex work to survive (source).
  3. Few people take the time to refine and think about what sex and gender mean, and the conversation ought to be lifted from intellectual bankruptcy, because there's lots of interesting stuff to talk about. Challenging people's assumptions is healthy and keeps us honest. Even if I don't agree with a single critique in this thread, I still have to refine and think through my views to talk about them, and others have to do the same to engage with me. Assumptions about sex and gender are deeply rooted, and so are extremely interesting to talk about.
tl;dr we talk about this stuff because we have to; it's the only way our lives and world are going to improve.

And furthermore, the actual person that was referred to in the first place was unequivocally a woman, gender female. As proven by their obvious physiological ability to conceive and give birth.
Why does that denote that one is female? It's no answer to say "sex and gender are your parts, ability to give birth means you're female," as that's circular and provides no justification at all. And I presume you would not consider infertile women to be men, correct?

Maybe you want to say that the ability to give birth is sufficient but not necessary to be female. But then, what makes an infertile woman a woman? How would we define what conditions are sufficient to be male or female? At some point, to make this argument, you've got to draw a line, and my contention is that any line you draw outside of "identifies as a woman" will exclude people who most would agree are women, whether that line is chromosomes or primary/secondary sex characteristics or anything else. If a definition excludes women who all reasonable people would agree are women, that definition is clearly not a universal and has no normative force. The end point I hope to reach, after much conversation, is that the reader is placed in a situation where they must accept that identifying as x gender is necessary and sufficient to be x gender, or to make thoughtful revisions to how they conceive of sex and gender to address the objections I'm raising.
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Does this mean people who are born that way have bodies that are wrong and we should try to "fix" them?
so the "perception" is someone doesn't think they are the sex they were born with, yes that would be an issue/abnormal, try to "fix" them, people can choose to do whatever they want imo, generally, but I'm not paying for it.

If an intersex person identified as female and asked you to use she/her pronouns, and she had both sets of sex organs, what would you do?
can you give me an example of when talking to a person you'd refer to them with a pronoun vs their name?  Like the conversation we are having, I can't imagine an instance where I would use a pronoun directed at you, that's just not how language works.

 why do chromosomes determine one's gender as male or female?
yeah typos happen, I'm not a geneticist but until recently that is how it's been, it is binary, as are the chromosomes, barring abnormalities.
Gender has some element of performance to it.
agreed
It seems to me that in a case like the above, it's acting like the gender that you're assigned at birth that's a charade.
you can "perform" the role w/o surgery, dangerous hormones etc, so if that's something someone wants to do, do it.  All animals afaik we've identified as male/female  in some species the females is dominant and the leader so roles doesn't really mean much to me, however it is binary as there are only males and females normally.  Animals are classified male/female based on physical and genetic characteristics.

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Probably because that is the entire role of the 23rd pair of chromosomes. 

That is like asking "why does DNA determine our species?".

If you think you are a man when you don't have a y chromosome, you are mistaken.

If you think you are a moose when you have human DNA, you are equally mistaken.
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so the "perception" is someone doesn't think they are the sex they were born with, yes that would be an issue/abnormal, try to "fix" them, people can choose to do whatever they want imo, generally, but I'm not paying for it.
Sorry, the question was about people who are intersex, people born with sex characteristics outside the binary, like someone born with both sets of sex organs. What sex are they born as, and why? Or is it not possible to say?

can you give me an example of when talking to a person you'd refer to them with a pronoun vs their name?  Like the conversation we are having, I can't imagine an instance where I would use a pronoun directed at you, that's just not how language works.
Sure! Pronouns are just an easy way to tell how someone wants to be referred to. I use she/her. When I play board games with my friends, a conversation might go
A: Did Lucy take her turn?
B: Yeah, she built a castle.

The vast majority of English-speaking trans people use she/her, he/him, or they/them, or a combination of those (e.g. she/her and they/them). A minority use other pronouns like ze/hir, which for most people were used to distinguish from she/her and he/him, but they've generally fallen out of favor as the singular they, as in, "I talked with Robin, and they said they went to the market already," has become more widely accepted and used in the English language.

yeah typos happen, I'm not a geneticist but until recently that is how it's been, it is binary, as are the chromosomes, barring abnormalities.
No worries. That is how it has been, but here's an extremely interesting article that describes how and why this has shifted, in light of the evidence.

you can "perform" the role w/o surgery, dangerous hormones etc, so if that's something someone wants to do, do it.  All animals afaik we've identified as male/female  in some species the females is dominant and the leader so roles doesn't really mean much to me, however it is binary as there are only males and females normally.  Animals are classified male/female based on physical and genetic characteristics.
I agree 100% that you don't need to take hormones or undergo surgery to be the gender you identify as. It's worth noting that hormone replacement therapy for trans people is safe and effective, about as safe as medication can get. Basically, I can't eat a million bananas (potassium), I pee more often, and I have increased risk of breast cancer (though not as high as the risk for cisgender women). This article explains the process for trans women, other articles on the site cover the process for trans men and gender nonconforming people.

The sex of many animals is similar to a binary in the sense that the spectrum ranges from male to female--e.g. intersex people have some parts that are considered male and others considered female. But there's a big difference between saying that sex is an either/or, that you are male or you are female, and saying that sex is a spectrum with male and female on either end. This is especially important in light of the likely fact that the average brains of transgender people differ from the average brains of other people in the gender they are assigned to, and in light of the fact that undergoing hormone therapy causes one to develop the secondary sex characteristics associated with the gender they identify as.
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Probably because that is the entire role of the 23rd pair of chromosomes. 

That is like asking "why does DNA determine our species?".
So, is it fair to say your argument is that sex and gender are defined by chromosomes because chromosomes define sex and gender? I'll direct you to this scientific article about sex. It explains how and why the scientific thinking on this point has shifted, and provides pretty clear evidence that chromosomes do not define sex.

The species discussion is a crazy interesting one I'd love to have at some point, but I'd need to read up on it first. I find the ways in which we attempt to order the world and stuff things into categories fascinating.
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like someone born with both sets of sex organs. What sex are they born as, and why? Or is it not possible to say?
from what I remember, there are either hormone levels or some other kind of testing along with physical presentation to determine which one is more, in other words these people are not 50% both sexes, they are more one than the other.
Sure! Pronouns are just an easy way to tell how someone wants to be referred to.
I see what you mean, I can't honestly answer that question as I have never been in that position yet.
If I did say it wouldn't be because I meant it or believed it, it would be a lie, if that is what makes people happy, lies, being fake etc I would probably do that.
 

side note but this was interesting https://youtu.be/C1roM98Dass


It's worth noting that hormone replacement therapy for trans people is safe and effective, about as safe as medication can get.

I think that's debatable, but again if someone wants to risk it, that's up to them so long as it doesn't affect me which includes my tax money

have some parts that are considered male and others considered female.
shared traits or similar ones are what we use to differentiate and define.
cars and trucks have many similarities but are vastly different, I'd say more different than similar.
Brains I think is a whole different discussion as we are talking about the outward, visible physical traits.

if xy and xx are not male and female chromosomes what are they?  what else can they be?
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That article said you should wait until a kid is three "to communicate their gender identity". I highly doubt a three year old should be making a decision that will affect it for the rest of its life.

All I am seeing is mention of "intersex". If you are trying to argue for a third gender, I would say that a genetic defect shouldn't be considered a normal trait. If someone asked you how many toes a human has, the answer would obviously be 10. If someone asked you how many lungs a person has, the answer would be two. Just because some defects occur in a few people doesn't mean it is a human trait, which gender is. So, when you ask someone how many genders there are, it would be 2. 

:)

If someone thinks they are a gender they are not, I don't believe in indulging a delusion. The same way I would discourage people to indulge the delusions of a schizophrenic guy. 
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when you ask someone how many genders there are, it would be 2. 
really what they should probably do is adopt the name trans or something like that, which accurately describes them, that would be used in place of he/she.  it would be awkward but eventually it would be normalized.  Also this could help for those who try to "pass" to fool the gender they are after.  Usually it's the guy being tricked into thinking that the person is a natural born female.
So if that would make it a 3rd gender I'm find with it.
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Female prison looks like fun. Well compared to male one. 


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Excuses, excuses.

One can bander such modernisms about all day long. But they are mere justifications.

And scientists can be found who will say one thing and their are scientists who will say the opposite.

But let's be honest this is not really a science issue. This is a simple common sense matter.

Common sense dictates that man and woman are the basis of procreation and the continuation of the species.

And prenatal developmental anomalies are what they are.

And postnatal contrivances that pander to our need for coital gratification are also what they are.



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from what I remember, there are either hormone levels or some other kind of testing along with physical presentation to determine which one is more, in other words these people are not 50% both sexes, they are more one than the other.
Yes and no. It is true that most people assigned female at birth have lots of estrogen and a little testosterone, and most people assigned male at birth have lots of testosterone and a little estrogen. But in terms of determining whether one is "more" male or female, there's too much complexity at work here. One of the articles I linked earlier mentioned cases like people with XY chromosomes having just enough mosaicism in their genes to conceive and carry to term a pregnancy, and an elderly man who had fathered a child and only found out late in life that he had a womb. Do we fabricate some kind of points system to decide in those cases?

side note but this was interesting https://youtu.be/C1roM98Dass
Agreed, interesting. I'm not going to comment on cancel culture here because that's a whole thread by itself lol, but here's some of my other thoughts. The optics in this encounter are awful. A cis male speaking for the non-binary, opposed to a truscum trans woman. Truscum is a word that refers to trans people that delegitimize other trans people, for instance by saying that you need gender dysphoria to be trans or that nonbinary people are essentially fake news.

I have major issues with India Willoughby (the trans woman in the video). I appreciate that she has blazed a trail in the media, and god knows the stress from all that visibility takes a toll on a person. But I find her views completely wrong and abhorrent. To summarize some of her views: drag is offensive and comparable to blackface, transition is a process by which you become trans, and people are choosing one of a billion genders just because they feel like it. When it comes to drag... just... no lol. Drag has a rich history and has not been used to marginalize women or trans people in any way nearly comparable to blackface. There are certainly transphobes in the drag world, but... there are transphobes everywhere.

As for her views on dysphoria and nonbinary people, you might notice a striking similarity between her views and the views of decidedly anti-trans people. Some people think truscum adopt positions like this because throwing others under the bus makes them more palatable to those who otherwise wouldn't accept them. I don't make any claim to see inside her head. 

I think that's debatable, but again if someone wants to risk it, that's up to them so long as it doesn't affect me which includes my tax money
Idk, I think the mental health benefits are well worth the minor/rare side effects. As for tax money, transition-related care is mental health care, and to the extent that we use tax money for health care, it also ought to be used for transition-related care. But a debate on whether and to what extent we should use tax money to provide healthcare generally is probably beyond the scope of this thread.

shared traits or similar ones are what we use to differentiate and define.
cars and trucks have many similarities but are vastly different, I'd say more different than similar.
Another way to look at it is the spectrum of visible light. Say the archetypal male is the color red and the archetypal female is the color purple. Even though orange is close as a color to red, they're still distinct colors. An either/or between male and female erases these distinctions, and so cannot be said to reflect any fundamental truth about the universe. But we use the terms male and female because they are useful. Red blends seamlessly into orange, then into yellow, then into green, then into blue, and then into purple, but it helps to have dividing lines somewhere when it comes to issues like breast and prostate cancer and other medical risks that differ between the ends of the spectrum. Most people fall on the ends, and so the ends are the most sensible reference points. I can't make any claim to know the history of how we got to this point and how the cultural expectations for the genders developed (several cultures have more than two genders), but this is where we're at now.

if xy and xx are not male and female chromosomes what are they?  what else can they be?
"Male and female chromosomes" are terms we use because they're practical, so I don't have an issue with the terms being used. I just think it's important to note that they come with a whole host of problems. People attach weird metaphysical significance to them where they have none. Hopefully the relevance of our conversation will become clear when we transition (heh) from talking about sex to talking about gender.

(1/2)

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Brains I think is a whole different discussion as we are talking about the outward, visible physical traits.
To recap, my argument has been that categorizing sex as male or female is fine to the extent that it's useful. The extent to which it is useful, however, is far less than is commonly believed. "Male" and "female" do not reflect any underlying objective truth about the world, and there is no identifiable necessary condition to fit in either category. Chromosomes don't equal sex, as, for example, some people with xy nonetheless develop in a manner such that any reasonable person would call them female. Primary/secondary sex characteristics don't equal sex, as people can be born with both sets or a mixture and we have no leg to stand on to tell them who they "really" are.

So, let's talk about gender. You might have heard the distinction between sex and gender as something like "sex is biological, gender is society's attitude toward the sexes" or something like that, or you may never have heard the distinction at all. Rather than provide a definition outright, I'd like to explain where I'm coming from. I've gone through male puberty, my body produces normal male levels of testosterone and estrogen, and I have male primary and secondary sex characteristics. Growing up, I just accepted "yeah I'm a guy" and didn't think too hard about it, not that I even knew what being trans was. As I grew up and hit puberty, I became increasingly depressed. I had little interest in sex, body image issues that I did not connect to gender at the time, and I just generally didn't give a sh*t about myself or take care of myself. It was around this time that I first began to learn of trans people, but I never considered that I could be one. To me it seemed like being a trans woman was something other than being a woman. I didn't want to be trans, I just wanted to be a woman.

So, I sat on that for years. It's not like I hated myself the whole time or anything like that, I had a happy-ish existence. But there were always things on the peripheral that I couldn't quite grasp. The dam broke last year, when I met a trans friend who was not only happy but thriving and accepted. One thing led to another and I realized, "holy sh*t, I can just be a girl". I started socially transitioning immediately, went on hormones a few months later, and I've never looked back.

The relevance of brains: I feel very contented when people use my chosen name and refer to me with my pronouns. I've been so adamant about hormones that I had made a plan going into the doctor's that if he didn't give me a timeline I was happy with, I was going to threaten to buy them from overseas and DIY. I've never been that assertive about anything else in my life, ever. The physical changes make me happier; I look in the mirror and feel content with myself. My mental health has been better than ever before, and I have better reasons to groom myself and take good care of my body now. Because of transition, my body and my friendships both better reflect who I feel I am/should be.

When I ask someone to refer to me as she/her and use my chosen name, I'm not asking them to deny anything about my body. I know what my chromosomes are. I'm just a girl regardless, and for me, transition is how I bring the rest of my life in line with my brain.

This isn't a universal experience, btw. Other people go through different things, feel different things, and are... well, different people lol. It's just mine.

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That article said you should wait until a kid is three "to communicate their gender identity". I highly doubt a three year old should be making a decision that will affect it for the rest of its life.
Full quote: "Intersex advocacy groups have therefore argued that doctors and parents should at least wait [to perform surgery] until a child is old enough to communicate their gender identity, which typically manifests around the age of three, or old enough to decide whether they want surgery at all." In context this is saying that: 1) performing surgery on the genitals of intersex infants is extremely risky and may result in gender dysphoria down the line, and 2) therefore parents should wait before making that decision. And it further says that parents should wait at least until their child's gender identity is clear to make a decision for them, or ideally wait until the child is old enough to decide for their self (notably, not three).

All I am seeing is mention of "intersex". If you are trying to argue for a third gender, I would say that a genetic defect shouldn't be considered a normal trait. If someone asked you how many toes a human has, the answer would obviously be 10. If someone asked you how many lungs a person has, the answer would be two. Just because some defects occur in a few people doesn't mean it is a human trait, which gender is. So, when you ask someone how many genders there are, it would be 2. 
The point of my argument so far is that sex is not normative. In other words, the categories we have for the sexes exist only to the extent that they are practical and don't reflect any underlying truth about the universe that everyone ought to conform to. For example, you mention the example of "humans have ten toes". But some humans do not have ten toes, and yet are still humans. Other animals have ten toes and yet are not humans. But yes, humans generally have ten toes. "Ten toes" is descriptive and not normative. Sex is descriptive and not normative. This is a major reason why gender identity, one's sense of self, should not be lumped together with one's sex, and why one's sex may appear to be one way while an individual nonetheless expresses an incongruous gender identity.
 
Your gender is not your sex, it is your gender identity. It is how you perceive yourself and how you want to be perceived by the world around you. When intersex people have surgery performed on them as infants, gender dysphoria may result where none may have otherwise existed, though their sex after surgery is more in line with the binary. This is because our senses of self and our brains are a part, and only a part, of our sex.

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I'm more than happy to respond if/when you decide to actually make an argument and respond to my points.