What debate style format should I use?

Author: DynamicSquid ,

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  • DynamicSquid
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    DynamicSquid
    So growing up, I was participated in debate related activities, and through my 5 plus years of debate tournament experience, I've used one and only one style. But I'm wondering, does this apply to online debate, or more specifically, this website? Here's how I was taught debate format (adjusted for online debate).

    - 3 rounds (6 speeches)
    - each speaker goes once per round

    Round 1:

    Proposition introduces the topic, defines any necessary terms, and if needed, creates a fair and balanced model
    Proposition will then move on into presenting his/her 2 contentions supporting the topic
    Proposition then concludes/summarizes his/her speech

    Opposition "clashes" with Proposition, pointing out all the mistakes or inaccuracies found in Proposition's speech
    Opposition then states his/her 2 contentions going up against the topic
    Opposition then concludes/summarizes his'her speech

    Round 2:

    Proposition clashes with Opposition, pointing out all the mistakes or inaccuracies found in Opposition's Speech (he/she could also reinforce what was previously stated)
    Proposition will then move on into his/her final argument(s) supporting the topic
    Proposition then concludes/summarizes his/her speech

    Opposition clashes with Proposition, pointing out all the mistakes or inaccuracies found in Proposition's Speech (he/she could also reinforce what was previously stated)
    Opposition will then move on into his/her final argument(s) supporting the topic
    Opposition then concludes/summarizes his/her speech

    Round 3:

    Proposition clashes with Opposition, pointing out all the mistakes or inaccuracies found in Opposition's Speech (he/she could also reinforce what was previously stated)
    Proposition summarizes his/her speech in total
    No new information can be brought up

    Opposition clashes with Proposition, pointing out all the mistakes or inaccuracies found in Proposition's Speech (he/she could also reinforce what was previously stated)
    Opposition summarizes his/her speech in total
    No new information can be brought up

    END



    So that's what a normal tournament debate is like for me. But what about this website? I can already see that some people follow this outline, but is that the preferred way, or is a more natural or restriction free style of debate preferred? Also, will there be any changes to the website in the future that requires a format to your speech (I'm not for or against a change, I'm just curious)?

    In short, is there a preferred style to online debate, and if not, what are the possibilities that it could become a reality?

    Thanks,
    Dynamic Squid
  • David
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    David
    --> @DynamicSquid
    Hi, DynamicSquid! 

    I want to begin by welcoming you to DebateArt.com! The format that I like to do on for online text debates as follows:

    Round 1: Opening arguments only
    Round 2: Rebuttals to opening arguments
    Round 3: Defense of opening arguments
    Round 4: Summary/Close

    Another possibility:

    Round 1: Opening arguments only
    Round 2: Rebuttals to opening arguments
    Round 3: Defense of opening arguments
    Round 4: Rebuttals to Defense
    Round 5: Summary/Close


  • RationalMadman
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    RationalMadman
    You can structure your twisting of the truth any way you want, in the end it's about pleasure to the voters' eyes and minds.
  • Ramshutu
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    --> @DynamicSquid
    Structure imo doesn’t matter, I much prefer general flow and back and forth over structure; I find it especially hard to read when there is a disjoint order with rebuttals skipping a round like the more formal structures come with.