Is there a difference between Deism and Toaism?

Author: RationalMadman ,

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To add to their similarity, Taoism's original name was Daoism. 

Both views on reality revolve around the idea that questioning God's motive is a zero-sum game since we're not God but are inside the simulation/creation. Both hold morality to be nothing more than a natural processed that we evolved over time. What exactly differentiates one from the other, except that one originated in China and the other has ambiguous origin?

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To add to their similarity, Taoism's original name was Daoism.

Both views on reality revolve around the idea that questioning God's motive is a zero-sum game since we're not God but are inside the simulation/creation. Both hold morality to be nothing more than a natural processed that we evolved over time. What exactly differentiates one from the other, except that one originated in China and the other has ambiguous origin?


China gave the world paper, the compass, pasta/noodles and lowered the cost to customers  of consumer goods. Taoism can easily and cheaply  be packaged by Walmart. Another win win for all.
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Taoism is functionally identical to Deism in all senses of morality and epistemology. Prove me wrong. 
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I think it depends on what you mean by taoism. 

I think it also depends on what you mean by deism.

Deism is literally just the Latin equivalent of the Greek "Theism". 


I don't know much about Taoism. I have read the Tao te Ching several times in many different translations. Tao means "The Way", and sure enough it is described much in the same terms that we would describe God, who we also call "The Way". In fact, before Christians went by that name, we simply said we followed The Way. 


I like the tao te ching.


But to bring it home, yes, if you take Deism as being a belief in the existence of God, I would say that the tao te ching certainly is describing God when it speaks of The Tao.



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And their 'god' is a perfectly balanced one between good and evil. They both think that God doesn't care about morality and is basically an absentee landlord to this space which we rent. They both tell us not to question God's motive or care.
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I get the impression that the tao te ching teaches that it is good to abide in The Way.

There are actually many forms of deism, as it simply means belief in a God, a god, gods, etc. It came to have this more modern meaning in more recent times when some took it to say they believe in God's existence, but they don't identify with a particular religion or tradition. 

Deism and taoism are different in that deism doesn't necessarily imply anything other than belief in deity or deities, where I would say that taoism speaks of The Tao in particular.

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Taoism is a brain state, not reliant on unknown external influences..... Everything is.

Whereas deism is a brain state wholly reliant on an unknown external influence...... Everything is, because.