Is the portrayal of death in battle an act of heroism?

Author: DynamicSquid ,

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  • DynamicSquid
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    I would say yes...

  • zedvictor4
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    --> @DynamicSquid
    Explain.
  • DynamicSquid
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    I would argue that even signing up to battle is an act of heroism. Some soldiers don't come home, and many are aware of that. You are risking your life, all for the common good.


  • PressF4Respect
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    --> @DynamicSquid
    Were the members of the Wehrmacht heroic?

  • Dr.Franklin
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    I would actually argue yes they were war heroes if they saved their fellow soldiers and showed sympathy, sure remember a fucking pope was a german ww2 soldier
  • PressF4Respect
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    sure remember a fucking pope was a german ww2 soldier
    Really? 


  • Dr.Franklin
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    In 1943, when he was 16, Joseph Ratzinger was drafted with many of his classmates into the Luftwaffenhelfer program. They were posted first to Ludwigsfeld, north of Munich, as part of a detachment responsible for guarding a BMW aircraft engine plant. Next they were sent to Unterföhring, northwest of Munich, and briefly to Innsbruck. From Innsbruck their unit went to Gilching to protect the jet fighter base and to attack Allied bombers as they massed to begin their runs towards Munich. At Gilching, Ratzinger served in a telephone communications post. On 10 September 1944, his class was released from the Corps. Returning home, Ratzinger had already received a new draft notice for the Reichsarbeitsdienst. He was posted to the Hungarian border area of Austria; Austria having been annexed by Germany in the Anschluss of 1938. When Hungary was occupied by the Red Army Ratzinger was put to work setting up anti-tank defences in preparation for the expected Red Army offensive.[7]
    On 20 November 1944, his unit was released from service. Joseph Ratzinger again returned home. After three weeks passed, he was drafted into the German army at Munich and assigned to the infantry barracks in the center of Traunstein, the city near which his family lived. After basic infantry training, he served at various posts around the city with his unit. They were never sent to the front. In late April or early May, shortly before Germany's surrender, he deserted. Desertions were widespread during the last weeks of the war, although deserters were subject to death if caught. However, diminished morale and equally diminished risk of prosecution from a preoccupied and disorganized German military contributed to the growing wave of soldiers looking toward self-preservation. He left the city of Traunstein and headed for his nearby village. "I used a little-known back road hoping to get through unmolested. But, as I walked out of a railroad underpass, two soldiers were standing at their posts, and for a moment the situation was extremely exciting for me. Thank God that they, too, had had their fill of war and did not want to become murderers." They used the excuse of his arm being in a sling to let him go home.[10]

  • PressF4Respect
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    --> @Dr.Franklin @DynamicSquid
    Also there's a huge difference between voluntary service and forced conscription. 

  • Dr.Franklin
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    In what way?


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    One is voluntary...

    The other isn't 

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    Ok?

    Both are heroes
  • PressF4Respect
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    Forced conscription doesn't make someone a hero.

    It makes someone who is fighting purely because they don't want to die.

    My point is, intent is very important to look at.
  • Dr.Franklin
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    You are forced into a war. You are a hero for risking for life, "intent" when risking life does not matter

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    What about the Schutzstaffel?
  • zedvictor4
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    Some might argue that "signing up to battle", is an act of stupidity.

    In fact the whole war thing is stupid.

    But it seems that we just can't help ourselves.

    Though, none of this is really relevant to the proposition.

    Can you explain the proposition?

    Why is the portrayal of death in battle, heroic?
  • Dr.Franklin
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    ?  

42 days later

  • Patmos
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    I think it depends on what you're fighting for and why. If you signed up for the Wehrmacht in WWII because you were pissed about the treaty of Versailles and French atrocities in the Ruhr Region but weren't really all that interested in the Nazi business, and you die defending your fellow soldiers from harm, then I think you are still heroic.
  • zedvictor4
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    But that's got nothing to do with the portrayal of death in battle.

    The inclusion of the word portrayal in the proposition is very specific.

    There is nothing particularly heroic about pretending to be killed in battle.
  • disgusted
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    Battle is just a disgusting waste of life.