ETHICAL EGOISM

Author: 3RU7AL ,

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  • 3RU7AL
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    3RU7AL
    Watch (Rick Sanchez) video explanation here, [LINK]

    Ethical egoism is the normative ethical position that moral agents ought to act in their own self-interest. It differs from psychological egoism, which claims that people can only act in their self-interest. Ethical egoism also differs from rational egoism, which holds that it is rational to act in one's self-interest.[1] Ethical egoism holds, therefore, that actions whose consequences will benefit the doer can be considered ethical in this sense.

    Ethical egoism contrasts with ethical altruism, which holds that moral agents have an obligation to help others. Egoism and altruism both contrast with ethical utilitarianism, which holds that a moral agent should treat one's self (also known as the subject) with no higher regard than one has for others (as egoism does, by elevating self-interests and "the self" to a status not granted to others). But it also holds that one is not obligated to sacrifice one's own interests (as altruism does) to help others' interests, so long as one's own interests (i.e. one's own desires or well-being) are substantially equivalent to the others' interests and well-being, but he has the choice to do so.

    Egoism, utilitarianism, and altruism are all forms of consequentialism, but egoism and altruism contrast with utilitarianism, in that egoism and altruism are both agent-focused forms of consequentialism (i.e. subject-focused or subjective). However, utilitarianism is held to be agent-neutral (i.e. objective and impartial): it does not treat the subject's (i.e. the self's, i.e. the moral "agent's") own interests as being more or less important than the interests, desires, or well-being of others. [LINK]

    Your scathing critique is requested. 
  • TwoMan
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    --> @3RU7AL
    Doesn't this issue boil down to how a given act is interpreted? A case for psychological egoism could be made regardless of the appearance of motive. In other words, if someone acts out of a seeming altruistic concern for another, it could be argued that the root of the act occurs by benefiting the self (subject) by producing a positive psychological response. In the same vein, one could also be considered to be avoiding pain by not experiencing the guilt that might occur were one not to act. Both of those scenarios would be happening unconsciously and might appear to be a case of ethical altruism.

    Irrespective of how one regards one's self vs. others, is an ethical consideration really just an unconscious form of pleasure seeking or pain avoidance?

  • TheRealNihilist
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    --> @TwoMan
    Basically the problem with labeling yourself an altruist or egoist, no real way of telling if you are doing things because you are doing it for others or doing it for yourself. 
  • 3RU7AL
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    --> @TheRealNihilist
    Basically the problem with labeling yourself an altruist or egoist, no real way of telling if you are doing things because you are doing it for others or doing it for yourself. 
    But there is a way to determine if you're holding yourself to the same standard you expect from everyone else (hypocrisy).
  • 3RU7AL
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    --> @TwoMan
    Irrespective of how one regards one's self vs. others, is an ethical consideration really just an unconscious form of pleasure seeking or pain avoidance?
    Certainly, but I believe the relevant aspect of all this is HOW YOU expect OTHERS to act.

    Iff everyone's just out for themselves, then you are resigned to MOBSTER ETHICS.

    Iff everyone's expected to respect the rights of others, then you need UNIFORM ENFORCEMENT.
  • TwoMan
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    --> @3RU7AL
    But there is a way to determine if you're holding yourself to the same standard you expect from everyone else (hypocrisy).
    By avoiding hypocrisy, is one serving one's self or others? I understand that the result is the same either way, I'm just curious what your thoughts are.
  • 3RU7AL
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    --> @TwoMan
    But there is a way to determine if you're holding yourself to the same standard you expect from everyone else (hypocrisy).
    By avoiding hypocrisy, is one serving one's self or others? I understand that the result is the same either way, I'm just curious what your thoughts are.
    I believe psychological-egoism is intrinsic and inescapable (fundamental human subjectivity).

    However, this does not mean that (externalized) ethical-egoism is intrinsic and inescapable.

    I believe that ethical utilitarianism (Kant's moral imperative) is a standard worth pursuing. [LINK]
  • TwoMan
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    --> @3RU7AL
    I believe that ethical utilitarianism (Kant's moral imperative) is a standard worth pursuing.
    Agreed. It would seem to be partially opposed to psychological egoism (intrinsic) and would therefore be considered a learned behavior.

  • ebuc
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    --> @3RU7AL
    Ethical egoism is the normative ethical position that moral agents ought to act in their own self-interest.
    Spiritual egoism is omni-considerate ergo self, other, we and us.

    It differs from psychological egoism, which claims that people can only act in their self-interest.
    I.e mental chess so that the ego is always in control i.e. cannot be placed to the side for considerations beyond self. Ex narcissist

    ....rational egoism, which holds that it is rational to act in one's self-interest....
    It is rational to sustain the greater whole ecological systems that sustain self, all of existing humanity and future progeney of this humanity.

    However, there is the option of rational, that considers humans to be the most costly biological integrity on Earth as it,

    overpopulates ---for systems in place--- 

    excessive pollution uneccessarily,

    and has potential to destroy all ecological systems that sustain humanity and other biological life ergo,

    some think it is rational that humans be eliminated or at least minimize their population to reaonable rational logical numbers that more closely align with the systems they use to produce their standard of living.

    It is complex


  • 3RU7AL
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    --> @TwoMan
    It would seem to be partially opposed to psychological egoism (intrinsic) and would therefore be considered a learned behavior.
    Well stated.
  • zedvictor4
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    --> @ebuc
    Well stated.
  • ebuc
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    --> @zedvictor4
    Well stated.
    Thanks. I try, however, I have not had English class since 10th grade ---mostly likely I nearly flunked out---   and dont recall ever having a philosophy class.

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