Baby Names

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Posts in total: 57
If you have kids, are thinking about kids, or even if you're not really at the point of thinking about having kids, what would you consider naming your children? What are your ideal baby names?

I'll share mine. I have some traditional Gaelic names to reflect my Irish heritage, quite a few German names to reflect my German heritage, and some Russian names because, to me, they sound attractive. There are also a few names of various extractions included.

Feel free to comment on other people's proposed baby names.

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Boys

Aodhan (pronounced: eyed + an)
August
Blue
Carolus
Christoph
Cian (pronounced: key + in)
Cobalt
Cyprien
Dakota
David
Dietrich
Eirnin (pronounced: air + nin)
Feidhelm (pronounced: fail + im)
Felix
Finbar
Friedrich
Gavin
Godfrey
Grey
Hans
Joachim
Johannes
Kaspar
Kenneth
Kiril
Liam
Marcellus
Marcus
Nevin
Niall (pronounced: nile)
Nikita
Paullus
River
Sascha
Sebastian
Silver
Theodoric
Tierney (pronounced: teer + nee)
Wilhelm
Xander
Xavier

Girls

Aibhlinn (pronounced: ave + leen)
Anastasia
Autumn
Callista
Cartimandua
Clover
Daimhin (pronounced: daw + veen)
Edeline
Emmaline
Guinevere
Heike
Hestia
Julia
Katja
Katrin
Katrina
Lara
Leia
Matilda
Minerva
Nadja
Natascha
Padme
Raina
Renate
Saoirse (pronounced: seer + sha)
Tatjana
Tilda
Winter

How about "Chaelle" for a girl?
--> @Swagnarok
How would you pronounce that?
--> @bsh1
Probably like "shell".
--> @Swagnarok
Nah. Shell will always make me think of sea shells. I don't want to picture a conch every time I say my daughter's name.
What, no shaykwonda?
--> @ethang5
Somehow, I don't think that'll make the list, lol.
Any comments on the names in my list?
--> @bsh1
I've always loved traditional Gaelic names. The whole culture is just mesmerizing to me. 

Guinevere for a girl and Cyprien for a boy being my favs from your list.

Aryelle and Lorelie also work for me. Do you have kids? Did you get to test drive any of your names?
--> @ethang5
I don't have kids, which I consider fortunate since I am only in my early twenties and lack a means of supporting any. I would, however, like a reasonably big family eventually, depending of course on my financial situation.

I haven't had a chance to "test drive" the names; I thought about giving a name from the list to my dog, but decided against it. 
--> @bsh1
I thought about giving a name from the list to my dog, but decided against it. 
Wise decision in every case except with Irish Setters. ; )
My goal is to have a kid who dresses, talks, and looks like someone where no matter how hard you try, you can't tell if they're a boy or a girl. Whenever you ask, they say "whatever you want me to be :3" and then name them Riley or Morgan or some other gender neutral name

That'd be awesome
--> @Vaarka
Sounds bi.
--> @bsh1
Sounds awesome
--> @Vaarka
Lol
Guy Gavin

Girl Julia

--> @SupaDudz
Why?
--> @bsh1
I don't like weird first names because my last name is weird enough

--> @SupaDudz
Lol. Would you say that my first name choices are wierd?
Many of the names I proposed have "normal" nicknames.

Boys

Christoph = Chris
Finbar = Fin
Friedrich = Fred/Freddy
Joachim = Jo
Johannes = Jo
Kenneth = Ken
Marcellus = Marc
Nikita = Nick/Nik
Paullus = Paul
Theodoric = Theo
Wilhelm = Will

Girls


Anastasia = Ana
Callista = Cally/Calli
Carti = Carti
Emmaline = Emma
Guinevere = Guin
Katja = Kat
Katrin = Kat
Katrina = Kat
--> @bsh1
Yes. But they can me conjugated into something small and normal

--> @SupaDudz
Well, some of my names are a bit odd because they're root names. The name Aiden, for instance, is a corruption of Aodhan. I prefer the originals because it's true to my Irish heritage. After all, I was named after the Irish king Brian Boru. Other names on my list would be "normal" if we were in Germany (names like Dietrich), so it's really all a matter of perspective. Plus, those names reflect my German heritage. I'm about half Irish and half German, with some French and English thrown in for good measure.
--> @bsh1
IN 5th grade I had a friend named Roach.  I dont  recall associating it with the bug. Not sure the spelling was the same.  He lived in downtown area of our city, that was brownstone like older { 50's } appartment buildings with some already condemmed.

 All kids ---or least my feelings at time--   thought of it to be a very poor and dangerous tough area to live in.

I saw him again around 17 years of age and he appeared to be in good spirits with a van he was driving.

Also around this time {1970 } I met another person who named his dog roach, and we all new what that was in reference to.

Met two people who were named Star. One a young man who rode off with my realtively new 5-speed Raleigh bycycle and another a girl.

Then last week I met a lady name Aloha.  Ive also known a Rain and two three Forest's.

Ive known a few men, older than me, over the years that would refer to me   ---if not also some others--- as babe, or baby.  I never quite understood that and was a little put off by it.
--> @mustardness
Forrest (usually spelled with two R's when it's a name) is actually a pretty traditional name of Anglic-Frisian origin.
--> @bsh1
I now see Roche appearing in politics today  ergo, my elementary school friend may have had some Roche french in him.

Randy in USA is ok but in England it means horny. Feeling a little randi today.
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Old bangar also common in USA
Banger: This means sausage...or a shabby car.

Jock: No, it’s not the hunky star quarterback. A Jock is a term for a Scottish person that, while affectionate in some instances, can also be interpreted as derogatory.

Ride: Don't ask a new Irish friend from the bar for a "ride" to your place. Ask for a lift instead, because a ride implies a roll in the hay.

Chips: If you've ever ordered fish and chips, you know that these are actually french fries. That greasy snack that we so love? They're called crisps.

Jelly: Here’s why foreigners constantly sneer at our love for PB&J sandwiches. "Jelly" is a monicker for Jell-O -- would you ever put that in your toast?

FannyWhile "fanny" refers to the backside in American English, the word is quite rude to Britons -- who use the word to refer to women's genitals. (Fanny packs are “bum bags” on this side of the pond.)

Fag: Before lashing out at the Brit politely asking for a "fag," remember that, to them, it means cigarette.

Knock up: If someone promises to "knock you up in the morning,” they're assuring you that they'll make sure to wake you up.

Thong: Flip-flop shoes.

Slang in Other Parts of the World 

Entree: When you order an entree in Australia, you’re actually ordering an appetizer. The "main" is the focus of the meal.