Exploration of the Political Thinker: Interview #4 - Fauxlaw

Author: RationalMadman ,

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  • RationalMadman
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    Welcome to EPT, let's get to it!

    The past 2 shows have been people who do not identify with labels, this time we have a proud conservative, who goes further to identify as a Sermonist.

    prime societal aim: To abide by the Sermon on the Mount [Matthew 5 - 7 of the Holy Bible, inclusive]. To me, this passage is not only good religious philosophy, it happens to be the premier political platform in existence. 

    Most of the passages mentioned have a lot to do with not 'showing off' how much suffering one is undergoing in their devotion to Jesus and the Lord God, at least in my reading it seems that way. This implies to me that Fauxlaw's outlook has a lot to do with humility and each person doing their duty and not complaining about it.
  • RationalMadman
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    --> @fauxlaw
    Please explain the essence of Matthew 5-7, am I correct in it being primarily about humility?
  • fauxlaw
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    I'd say that your assessment of the SoM is a direct hit. If one were to condense the entirety of the SoM, even as a political platform, "humility" would be that one word. Meek, for example, is often aligned with weak, not only because they rhyme, but the perception of a meek person is often perceived as reserved, shy, and, well, weak. I think it is just the opposite. I think of Teddy Roosevelt's  quote of walking softly with a big stick. One is able to defend one's self without doubt, but would rather find any other solution to an issue than fighting over it. Our recent countrywide reaction to the death of George Floyd is a perfect example. Mayhem and destruction has far outweighed the perception of peaceful protest as a public response to the incident that should never have happened. Neither should the rioting.

    I view the SoM as a slow, methodical progression of proper attitudes, beginning with the simple, and meant to be easy attitudes to acquire, gradually becoming more difficult to accomplish, but also more far reaching in effect. The first attitudes discussed are personal improvement efforts. They are for healing the self of anger, bitterness, disappointment, and sorrow. "Physician, heal thyself" might be a good description of these beginning attitudes. Fix the faults in each of us first, then extend the effort outward to be of help and service to others. It is more difficult to be effective serving others if we are still broken, ourselves. The trend of this passage from self-motivated actions of improvement to outward-motivated actions is a difficult path to remain upon because it fights our somewhat natural inclination to be self-centered. But a society filled with self-centered individuals will only achieve greatness to the extent of the weakest, most self-centered among us.

    A careful read and pondering of this progression of self-improvement to improve society as a whole is deliberate and satisfying, overcoming the natural self to be self-centered. "It's all about me" is replaced with "it's all about you, or us, together." As we master each attitude, becoming better attuned to its effort, the more we each heal ourselves and one another until we reach, at the conclusion, the most difficult of attitudes: to love our enemies. That's actually an oxymoron, but it could only be said in that fashion to realize just how difficult, but ultimately healing to all of society. A loved enemy  is no longer an enemy. The real goal is to make of enemies friends, and not someone who is ignored. It's easy to ignore an enemy, and they remain such. But love engages. Love overcomes animosity. The enemy him or herself either reciprocate4s, in time, or doesn't, but either result should be faced with our same face, regardless. Unreciprocated love is hard to maintain, but that's the point. No one said it was easy to do. That's what makes the SoM so challenging, and, until it is sincerely tried, it cannot be panned as ineffective. Is there a better politick? No.
  • RationalMadman
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    --> @fauxlaw
     Is there a better politick?
    In my opinion yes and if you invite me to challenge you and present my own ideas, I will.

    Nonetheless, we can assume 'no' to continue with you as the interviewee.

    Your system actually reminds me very much of Confucianism (which South Korea runs on but also quite a few parts of China). It relies on strict adherence to one's role in society and the duties that come along with that. It's very stoic in the sense of 'shut up and get on with life, don't show off' and only differs to your ideals in that it isn't Christian and its afterlife is almost nonexistent (this is because it stopped being developed as a religion and turned into a political system during its evolution).

    One major issue with the ideals you hold is surely the mental health and thus happiness of those involved. Do you believe that happiness matters or is happiness a luxury? How about confidence?
  • RationalMadman
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    I take it that you want to end this interview.
  • fauxlaw
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    No, just otherwise busy at the moment. Give me a day or so