FORMER PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH's SPEECH at the FLIGHT 93 MEMORIAL SERVICE

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Thank you very much. Laura and I are honored to be with you. Madam Vice President, Vice President Cheney. Governor Wolf, Secretary Haaland, and distinguished guests:

Twenty years ago, we all found -- in different ways, in different places, but all at the same moment -- that our lives would be changed forever. The world was loud with carnage and sirens, and then quiet with missing voices that would never be heard again. These lives remain precious to our country, and infinitely precious to many of you. Today we remember your loss, we share your sorrow, and we honor the men and women you have loved so long and so well.

For those too young to recall that clear September day, it is hard to describe the mix of feelings we experienced. There was horror at the scale -- there was horror at the scale of destruction, and awe at the bravery and kindness that rose to meet it. There was shock at the audacity -- audacity of evil -- and gratitude for the heroism and decency that opposed it. In the sacrifice of the first responders, in the mutual aid of strangers, in the solidarity of grief and grace, the actions of an enemy revealed the spirit of a people. And we were proud of our wounded nation.

In these memories, the passengers and crew of Flight 93 must always have an honored place. Here the intended targets became the instruments of rescue. And many who are now alive owe a vast, unconscious debt to the defiance displayed in the skies above this field.

It would be a mistake to idealize the experience of those terrible events. All that many people could initially see was the brute randomness of death. All that many could feel was unearned suffering. All that many could hear was God's terrible silence. There are many who still struggle with a lonely pain that cuts deep within.

In those fateful hours, we learned other lessons as well. We saw that Americans were vulnerable, but not fragile -- that they possess a core of strength that survives the worst that life can bring. We learned that bravery is more common than we imagined, emerging with sudden splendor in the face of death. We vividly felt how every hour with our loved ones was a temporary and holy gift. And we found that even the longest days end.

Many of us have tried to make spiritual sense of these events. There is no simple explanation for the mix of providence and human will that sets the direction of our lives. But comfort can come from a different sort of knowledge. After wandering long and lost in the dark, many have found they were actually walking, step by step, toward grace.

As a nation, our adjustments have been profound. Many Americans struggled to understand why an enemy would hate us with such zeal. The security measures incorporated into our lives are both sources of comfort and reminders of our vulnerability. And we have seen growing evidence that the dangers to our country can come not only across borders, but from violence that gathers within. There is little cultural overlap between violent extremists abroad and violent extremists at home. But in their disdain for pluralism, in their disregard for human life, in their determination to defile national symbols, they are children of the same foul spirit. And it is our continuing duty to confront them.

After 9/11, millions of brave Americans stepped forward and volunteered to serve in the Armed Forces. The military measures taken over the last 20 years to pursue dangers at their source have led to debate. But one thing is certain: We owe an assurance to all who have fought our nation's most recent battles. Let me speak directly to veterans and people in uniform: The cause you pursued at the call of duty is the noblest America has to offer. You have shielded your fellow citizens from danger. You have defended the beliefs of your country and advanced the rights of the downtrodden. You have been the face of hope and mercy in dark places. You have been a force for good in the world. Nothing that has followed -- nothing -- can tarnish your honor or diminish your accomplishments. To you, and to the honored dead, our country is forever grateful.

In the weeks and months following the 9/11 attacks, I was proud to lead an amazing, resilient, united people. When it comes to the unity of America, those days seem distant from our own. A malign force seems at work in our common life that turns every disagreement into an argument, and every argument into a clash of cultures. So much of our politics has become a naked appeal to anger, fear, and resentment. That leaves us worried about our nation and our future together.
I come without explanations or solutions. I can only tell you what I have seen.

On America's day of trial and grief, I saw millions of people instinctively grab for a neighbor's hand and rally to the cause of one another. That is the America I know.

At a time when religious bigotry might have flowed freely, I saw Americans reject prejudice and embrace people of Muslim faith. That is the nation I know.
At a time when nativism could have stirred hatred and violence against people perceived as outsiders, I saw Americans reaffirm their welcome to immigrants and refugees. That is the nation I know.

At a time when some viewed the rising generation as individualistic and decadent, I saw young people embrace an ethic of service and rise to selfless action. That is the nation I know.

This is not mere nostalgia; it is the truest version of ourselves. It is what we have been -- and what we can be again.

Twenty years ago, terrorists chose a random group of Americans, on a routine flight, to be collateral damage in a spectacular act of terror. The 33 passengers and 7 crew of Flight 93 could have been any group of citizens selected by fate. In a sense, they stood in for us all.

The terrorists soon discovered that a random group of Americans is an exceptional group of people. Facing an impossible circumstance, they comforted their loved ones by phone, braced each other for action, and defeated the designs of evil.

These Americans were brave, strong, and united in ways that shocked the terrorists -- but should not surprise any of us. This is the nation we know. And whenever we need hope and inspiration, we can look to the skies and remember.

God bless.


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INGRAHAM:  AMERICA 'won't be fooled again' as BUSH 'speaks for Biden' in POLITICAL REMARKS
George W. Bush's condemnation of 'extremists' sounded like it came from a Democrat, host says

Laura Ingraham slams George W Bush’s ugly 9/11 remarks on 'The Ingraham Angle'

In her "Ingraham Angle" on Monday, host Laura Ingraham noted that President Joe Biden failed to offer public remarks on Saturday, 20 years after Al Qaeda terrorists attacked America on September 11, 2001.

(NOTE:  This is a lie.  Transcript of Biden's speech on 9/11 follows in next post)

She also noted how pundits and public observers had varied predictions as to why Biden was silent – whether he would be booed on stage at such a solemn event, or whether he would go off script or get lost.

But, the host said the most plausible reason is that former President George W. Bush essentially spoke as a proxy for him during remarks in Shanksville, Pennsylvania.

"Why would Biden need to speak at all when George W. Bush would do it for him?" she said, pointing to what she said was a political commentary in the midst of his remarks.

"We have seen growing evidence that the dangers to our country can do not only across borders, but from violence that gathers within. There is little cultural overlap between violent extremists abroad and violent extremists at home. But there is disdainful pluralism in their disregard for human life, in their determination to defile national symbols. They are children of the same foul spirit and it is our continuing duty to confront them," Bush said Saturday.

Ingraham said the 43rd president wasn't speaking about actual extremists like Antifa or Black Lives Matter, "whose rampages and riots caused death and destruction coast to coast." She added that Bush never once spoke out during the mass violence and rank criminal activity in places like Portland, Philadelphia, Washington and New York last year.

(NOTE: This is lie.  Bush's remarks regarding George Floyd's death and the rioting that followed included in subsequent posts)

"Do you remember seeing him speak out about any of that? When they screamed that America is "inherently racist" did he raise an objection? When they tried to burn down Saint John’s Church across from the White House did President Bush decry the defiling of "national symbols"? No and No."

Those remarks, she said, would have fit just as well coming out of Biden's mouth – as the president rarely misses a chance to slam his predecessor or his predecessor's supporters on one account or another.

"Of course, the elites who despised Bush for the 8 years he was in office lapped it up," Ingraham added, pointing to plaudits from CNN's Dana Bash and John Berman, and MSNBC's Kasie Hunt.

"Bush and Obama have coordinated before in hitting Trump. One day in October 2017, both men in separate speeches hit Trump without mentioning him by name of course," Ingraham added. 

"When Benghazi went down and four Americans died, Bush didn’t speak out. When Obamacare was rammed through without a single Republican vote, Bush didn’t speak out. When Biden created a humanitarian, national security, and economic nightmare at the border, Bush didn’t speak out."

(NOTE:  In fact, American tradition from Washington to Obama discouraged political critique from former President as a gesture of National loyalty.)

"But when Donald Trump began to slowly but surely call out and dismantle Bush’s globalist legacy, he couldn’t stop himself.  It was personal."

She played another clip from Bush's speech, in which he claimed "bigotry seems emboldened. Our politics seem more vulnerable to conspiracy theories and outright fabrication… We’ve seen nationalism distorted into nativism…" noting again that any "prominent Democrat" could be imagined saying the same about Donald Trump.

(NOTE: The fact that Ingraham perceives criticism of Trump in Bush's criticism of anti-American conspiracies and lies tells us more about Ingraham's perception of Trump than her perception of Bush.)

In turn, she added, Democrats and their media allies have ideologically separated the Bushes and Cheneys from the GOP and have espoused that "it should essentially be labeled a terrorist organization. This idea is being openly discussed among the left."

"Let’s not kid ourselves, the Bushes helped raise 150 million dollars for Jeb’s 2016 run, and in the end, Jeb dropped out before getting to his own home state primary.  And they still don’t get it.  They’re not mad at the people who called him a war criminal or Hitler or who ridiculed him every week on Saturday Night Live. They’re mad at the Republicans who rejected their policies."

"They all claimed that Trump was the devil incarnate for demanding loyalty of the people who worked for him, but the truth is, the Bushes were the ones who demanded personal loyalty regardless of how their policies affected the country."

"This is all hard for me to say tonight, because I always liked the Bushes personally."

Ingraham said she herself has seen the Bushes' in action in that way, when she publicly questioned President Bush's 2005 choice of White House Deputy Chief of Staff Harriet Miers to replace Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor. Bush ultimately settled on now-Justice Sam Alito Jr.

"When I questioned and ultimately helped torpedo his nomination of the supremely unqualified Harriet Miers to the Supreme Court, the Bush White House made it clear they wouldn’t ever deal with me again," she said. "You can never go against the Family."

"So the Old Bush Guard has declared an unwinnable war again, and this time it’s against the 74-million-plus Republicans who voted for Trump in 2020, and who didn’t vote for Jeb in 2016."

(NOTE:  Bush condemned violent extremism in American politics, it is Ingraham who is equating all 74 million Trump voters to violent extremists.)

She noted that while Bush was trying to endear himself to the media that called him all sorts of names and demonized him for eight years, Trump was in the very same city meeting with firefighters and NYPD officers to mark the solemn occasion.

(NOTE:  FOX News cut away from Trump's speech and issued an instant correction when Trump falsely claimed that he won the 2020 Presidential election.  Although the occasion of the speech was 9/11, the subject was primarily Trump's personal post-presidential grievances.)

"The fact is, most conservatives long ago shook off the allure of the Bushes.  We found new leaders – including exciting young governors -- who will fight for us instead of against us, and we won’t be fooled again," the host said.



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Here are President Biden's from the Shanksville Firehouse on Sept. 11 (FOX News falsely claims that Biden made no speeches on 9/11)

On this 9/11, like every 9/11, I’m thinking about my friend Davis, who I grew up with in Delaware. On this day 20 years ago, he and his family had just passed the first year without their youngest of three sons, Teddy, who died in a boating accident at age 15. And his eldest son, Davis Jr., was just six days into the new job, on the 104th floor of the South Tower, the World Trade Center. Davis went straight to ground zero to search for his son. They searched deep into the last inning of hope, as he put it. A few days later, I spoke with Davis, and talked as fathers who know. I was on my way to speak to the students at the University of Delaware about what to make of the new world we were in. He told me to tell people, quote, “Don’t be afraid.” He said, tell them, “Don’t be afraid.”

The absolute courage it took after two unimaginable losses is extraordinary, yet the most ordinary of American things. To know life can be unfair and uncertain, a cruel twist of accident or deliberate act of evil. But, even in darkness to still be the light. To the families of the 2,977 people from more than 90 nations killed on September 11th, 2001 in New York city, Arlington, Virginia, and Shanksville, Pennsylvania, and the thousand more who were injured, America and the world commemorate you and your loved ones, the pieces of your soul. We honor all those who risked and gave their lives in the minutes, hours, months, and years afterwards. The firefighters, police officers, EMTs and construction workers and doctors and nurses, faith leaders, service members, veterans, and all of the everyday people who gave their all to rescue, recover and rebuild.

But, it’s so hard whether it’s the first year or the 20th. Some of them have grown up without parents, and parents have suffered without children. Husbands and wives have had to find ways forward without their partners in their life with them. Brothers and sisters, uncles and aunts, loved ones and friends that have had to celebrate birthdays and milestones with a hole in their heart. No matter how much time has passed, and these commemorations bring everything painfully back, as if you just got the news, a few seconds ago. And so on this day, Jill and I hold you close in our hearts and send you our love.

For people around the world that you’ll never know who are suffering through their own losses who see you, your courage, your courage gives them courage that they, too, can get up and keep going. We hope that 20 years later, the memory of your beloved brings a smile to your lips, even while still bringing a tear to your eye. The days that’s followed September 11th, 2001, we saw heroism everywhere, in places expected and unexpected. We also saw something all too rare, a true sense of national unity. Unity and resilience, the capacity to recover and repair in the face of trauma. Unity and service, the 9/11 generation is stepping up to serve and protect the face of terror, to get those terrorists who were responsible, to show everyone seeking to do harm to America, that we will hunt you down, and we will make you pay.

That will never stop, today, tomorrow, ever, from protecting America. Yet, we also witnessed the darker forces of human nature: fear and anger, resentment and violence against Muslim Americans, true and faithful followers of a peaceful religion. We saw a national unity bend. We learned that unity is the one thing that must never break. Unity is what makes us who we are, America at its best. To me, that’s the central lesson of September 11th. It’s that at our most vulnerable in the push and pull of all that makes us human and the battle for the soul of America, unity is our greatest strength.

Unity doesn’t mean we have to believe the same thing. We must have a fundamental respect and faith in each other and in this nation. We are unique in the history of the world because we’re the only nation based on an idea, an idea that everyone is created equal and should be treated equally throughout their lives. That is the task before us, to once again, lead not just by the example of our power, but by the power of our example, and I know we can. For I know hope is not simply an expectation. Hope is a conviction. Hope allows us to act with courage, to act and honor those we lost 20 years ago and those who have given their whole souls to the cause of this nation every day since. To act and build a future, not a reactionary one or one based on fear, but a future of promise, strength, and grace worthy of their dreams and sacrifice. And to act and keep the faith that while life is fragile, it is truly something wonderful.

We find strength in its broken places, as Hemingway wrote. We find light in the darkness. We find purpose to repair, renew, and rebuild. And as my friend told me that September 20 years ago, we must not be afraid. May God bless you all. May God bless the lives lost on September 11th, 2001 and their loved ones that were left behind. May God protect our troops.

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Statement by Former President George W. Bush regarding the death of George Floyd  (FOX News falsely claims that Bush 'never once spoke out' regarding the death and the violence that followed)

Laura and I are anguished by the brutal suffocation of George Floyd and disturbed by the injustice and fear that suffocate our country. Yet we have resisted the urge to speak out, because this is not the time for us to lecture. It is time for us to listen. It is time for America to examine our tragic failures – and as we do, we will also see some of our redeeming strengths.

It remains a shocking failure that many African Americans, especially young African American men, are harassed and threatened in their own country. It is a strength when protesters, protected by responsible law enforcement, march for a better future. This tragedy — in a long series of similar tragedies — raises a long overdue question: How do we end systemic racism in our society? The only way to see ourselves in a true light is to listen to the voices of so many who are hurting and grieving. Those who set out to silence those voices do not understand the meaning of America — or how it becomes a better place.  

America’s greatest challenge has long been to unite people of very different backgrounds into a single nation of justice and opportunity. The doctrine and habits of racial superiority, which once nearly split our country, still threaten our Union. The answers to American problems are found by living up to American ideals — to the fundamental truth that all human beings are created equal and endowed by God with certain rights. We have often underestimated how radical that quest really is, and how our cherished principles challenge systems of intended or assumed injustice. The heroes of America — from Frederick Douglass, to Harriet Tubman, to Abraham Lincoln, to Martin Luther King, Jr. — are heroes of unity. Their calling has never been for the fainthearted. They often revealed the nation’s disturbing bigotry and exploitation — stains on our character sometimes difficult for the American majority to examine. We can only see the reality of America's need by seeing it through the eyes of the threatened, oppressed, and disenfranchised. 

That is exactly where we now stand. Many doubt the justice of our country, and with good reason. Black people see the repeated violation of their rights without an urgent and adequate response from American institutions. We know that lasting justice will only come by peaceful means. Looting is not liberation, and destruction is not progress. But we also know that lasting peace in our communities requires truly equal justice. The rule of law ultimately depends on the fairness and legitimacy of the legal system. And achieving justice for all is the duty of all. 

This will require a consistent, courageous, and creative effort. We serve our neighbors best when we try to understand their experience. We love our neighbors as ourselves when we treat them as equals, in both protection and compassion. There is a better way — the way of empathy, and shared commitment, and bold action, and a peace rooted in justice. I am confident that together, Americans will choose the better way. 

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i hate gwb but i didnt know he was a little bit based
TheUnderdog
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Our response to 9/11 was way overblown.  Somehow 3000 deaths in the US justifies 500,000 middle eastern deaths in the middle east.  You don't have middle easterners having this, "Never forget" mentality.
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--> @TheUnderdog
bush was one of the worst presidents of the 2000,s
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--> @TheUnderdog
Our response to 9/11 was way overblown.
Well stated.



And our  intellectual left wing lick arse Blair was certainly cringeworthy too.

But nonetheless, the Lefties and the Righties stood shoulder to shoulder.

And set off once again on a righteous crusade to the dark and despairing regions of Central Asia.

To teach those heathen Afghan goat herds and pomegranate farmers a lesson that they would never forget.



And once again those proud warriors, returned victorious.

Bathed in the glory of having achieved absolutely fuck all.


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--> @oromagi
very shocking that a member of the skull and bones society would throw shade at people threatening their rule over us. 

The NWO knows their days are numbered. Their stranglehold on media has been shaken. Cryptocurrency is a democratic type of money that usurp the fiat currency they control and manipulate through the federal reserve and other similar institutions the world over. 

The old order is dying and losing their wealth and power, while a new order that is altruistic and who resent power, emerges. One that believes in fairness, and meritocracy. One that will destroy illness and death and poverty, while having fun doing it. 

The new billionaire class emerging will burn everything the illuminati through societies such as skull and bones, the Fabian society and the bilderburg have erected that only aim to give them more power and honor their wierd owl God they all secretly worship. 

No, it doesn't surprise me at all that a skull and bones member would be scared. At this point he is just buying his time. The storm on the capital by patriots scared them, but the moves similarly made by youth during g the BLM riots to also take over other federal and state buildings also scared them. 

The new order that will ironically displace the NWO, will probably let these guys live in exile, but if the masses who have been screwed are inpatient, their heads will be on pikes and honestly probably should be. 

His job now is to unite with other illuminati like Biden and hope that they can work together to pacify the resistance by tricking them into believing that democracy is real and that no oligarchs or ruling class exist. That in fact social engineering is a myth that no company or powerful people would ever engage in, despite it's obvious easy profit to made by engaging in it.

The pikes are coming, and nobody on either side of the aisle aligned with the power brokers will be safe. I'll be so happy to help the nation rebuild into something that is actually beneficial to all of us, one free of injustice, poverty and corruption. 
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--> @TheUnderdog
You don't have middle easterners having this, "Never forget" mentality.
Ironically, this part couldn't be further from the truth. That said, your original point is somewhat correct for the wrong reasons.

The deaths caused in the middle east weren't 'revenge' for 9/11, that understanding is not at all a direct or even indirect way to interpret things. In fact, 9/11 (whether inside job or not) was one of a series of attacks that succeeded it (terrorist acts) resulting from a vicious rage at how US had promised Al Qaeda and the Taliban that they'd help them and then betrayed them (both were assisted heavily by the US to hurt the USSR and other communist regimes, Al Qaeda wasn't just funded it was begun by the CIA wheras the Taliban already existed but was funded by them).

Both of these had a lot of fury to the US and UK alike (but more so to the US) because it was the US who had directly promised them the loyalty and rewards later on and what happened once the Cold War ended was they helped the Saudi government catch and tame Al Qaeda by snitching a lot to them, they tried the same with the Taliban but Pakistan's government was not as cooperative or happy about it and the Taliban was also more powerful relatively vs the Pakistani military.

This betrayal to both is why the fury was there already.