Can someone explain the ethics of care in a simplified way?

Author: Tejretics ,

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  • Tejretics
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    Tejretics
    What the title says.

    I'm interested in understanding:

    (1) What exactly the ethics of care is; is it a normative ethical theory? Is it a prescribed way to apply another normative ethical theory? In particular, I don't get what "care" means. 

    (2) A clear and succinct explanation of what it prescribes (if anything).

    (3) The role it plays in feminist theory and how it interacts with gender. 

    Wikipedia and SEP haven't been useful in explaining it to me. 
  • Fallaneze
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    --> @Tejretics
    Here's my take.

    (1) It's normative but how one ought to treat another individual is specific to that individual's circumstances. Usually, normative theories are based on generalizable rules that apply to everyone regardless of anyone's social identity (i.e. consequentialism). Under the ethics of care, however, underserved individuals, like minorities and women, are owed increased care. The level of care they deserve is further determined by their circumstances.

    It is its own distinct moral theory.

    "Care" is a conglomeration of 'good behaviors' like "attentiveness", "responsibility", "competence", and "responsiveness." The wiki page quickly explains what each one means.

    (2) it prescribes increased care to underserved individuals such as minorities and women.

    (3) the advocation of special care for groups, such as minority women, for the advancement and protection of feminist virtues. Gender discrimination still exists and is why the ethics of care was developed.

    That's what I believe it means.



  • keithprosser
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    --> @Tejretics
    I think option a is the one 'care ethics' would suggest. 

  • keithprosser
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