donald trump is trying to kill you

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  • n8nrgmi
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    n8nrgmi

    Donald Trump Is Trying to Kill You


    There’s a lot we don’t know about the legacy Donald Trump will leave behind. And it is, of course, hugely important what happens in the 2020 election. But one thing seems sure: Even if he’s a one-term president, Trump will have caused, directly or indirectly, the premature deaths of a large number of Americans.
    Some of those deaths will come at the hands of right-wing, white nationalist extremists, who are a rapidly growing threat, partly because they feel empowered by a president who calls them “very fine people.”
    Some will come from failures of governance, like the inadequate response to Hurricane Maria, which surely contributed to the high death toll in Puerto Rico. (Reminder: Puerto Ricans are U.S. citizens.)
    Some will come from the administration’s continuing efforts to sabotage Obamacare, which have failed to kill health reform but have stalled the decline in the number of uninsured, meaning that many people still aren’t getting the health care they need. Of course, if Trump gets his way and eliminates Obamacare altogether, things on this front will get much, much worse.

    But the biggest death toll is likely to come from Trump’s agenda of deregulation — or maybe we should call it “deregulation,” because his administration is curiously selective about which industries it wants to leave alone.
    Consider two recent events that help capture the deadly strangeness of what’s going on.
    One is the administration’s plan for hog plants to take over much of the federal responsibility for food safety inspections. And why not? It’s not as if we’ve seen safety problems arise from self-regulation in, say, the aircraft industry, have we? Or as if we ever experience major outbreaks of food-borne illness? Or as if there was a reason the U.S. government stepped in to regulate meatpacking in the first place?
    Now, you could see the Trump administration’s willingness to trust the meat industry to keep our meat safe as part of an overall attack on government regulation, a willingness to trust profit-making businesses to do the right thing and let the market rule. And there’s something to that, but it’s not the whole story, as illustrated by another event: Trump’s declaration the other day that wind turbines cause cancer.
    Now, you could put this down to personal derangement: Trump has had an irrational hatred for wind power ever since he failed to prevent construction of a wind farm near his Scottish golf course. And Trump seems deranged and irrational on so many issues that one more bizarre claim hardly seems to matter.
    But there’s more to this than just another Trumpism. After all, we normally think of Republicans in general, and Trump in particular, as people who minimize or deny the “negative externalities” imposed by some business activities — the uncompensated costs they impose on other people or businesses.

    For example, the Trump administration wants to roll back rules that limit emissions of mercury from power plants. And in pursuit of that goal, it wants to prevent the Environmental Protection Agency from taking account of many of the benefits from reduced mercury emissions, such as an associated reduction in nitrogen oxide.
    But when it comes to renewable energy, Trump and company are suddenly very worried about supposed negative side effects, which generally exist only in their imagination. Last year the administration floated a proposal that would have forced the operators of electricity grids to subsidize coal and nuclear energy. The supposed rationale was that new sources were threatening to destabilize those grids — but the grid operators themselves denied that this was the case.
    So it’s deregulation for some, but dire warnings about imaginary threats for others. What’s going on?
    Part of the answer is, follow the money. Political contributions from the meat-processing industry overwhelmingly favor Republicans. Coal mining supports the G.O.P. almost exclusively. Alternative energy, on the other hand, generally favors Democrats.
    There are probably other things, too. If you’re a party that wishes we could go back to the 1950s (but without the 91 percent top tax rate), you’re going to have a hard time accepting the reality that hippie-dippy, unmanly things like wind and solar power are becoming ever more cost-competitive.
    Whatever the drivers of Trump policy, the fact, as I said, is that it will kill people. Wind turbines don’t cause cancer, but coal-burning power plants do — along with many other ailments. The Trump administration’s own estimates indicate that its relaxation of coal pollution rules will kill more than 1,000 Americans every year. If the administration gets to implement its full agenda — not just deregulation of many industries, but discrimination against industries it doesn’t like, such as renewable energy — the toll will be much higher.
    So if you eat meat — or, for that matter, drink water or breathe air — there’s a real sense in which Donald Trump is trying to kill you. And even if he’s turned out of office next year, for many Americans it will be too late.



  • Snoopy
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    Paul Krugman joined The New York Times in 1999 as an Op-Ed columnist. He is distinguished professor in the Graduate Center Economics Ph.D. program and distinguished scholar at the Luxembourg Income Study Center at the City University of New York. In addition, he is professor emeritus of Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School
  • Swagnarok
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    Good Gott, the sheer paranoia of this...
  • Greyparrot
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    --> @Swagnarok
    Doesn't matter. Earth will end in 12 years.
  • DBlaze
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    --> @Snoopy
    This article lost all credibility when the author said that Trump referred to White Nationalist as very fine people.  That is just a lie.  Trump was referring to the people that protested the removal of statues to preserve history, he was not referring to the White supremacy gathering, anyone with a brain that functions correctly knows this.   

    I heard someone at my work earlier this week spreading around that Trump said he was cutting Aid to 3 Mexican Countries, who heard this from someone else.  Trump did not say this, it was an bad error on Fox News part (an unbelievable bad error, sheer stupidity, I hope someone got fired).  A banner they had scrolling the screen during Fox and Friends.  This got misconstrued into people thinking Trump actually said it, then people not bothering to actually look it up, and spreading it around more.

    This is the reason a lot of people don't like Trump, because ignorant people hear things like the above and spread it around to other ignorant people, and no one who knows the truth argues because it is just not worth it, and they don't want to be called a bigot for being a Trump supporter because he thinks White supremacists are "very fine people".

    The news needs to stop feeding the ignorant, but they have an agenda, and it seems to work.  And they think Trump supporters are uneducated.... smdh.
  • Alec
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    --> @Greyparrot
    Doesn't matter. Earth will end in 12 years.

    Earth will be fine in 12 years.  In 2006, Al Gore thought the world would end in 10 years.  He was obviously wrong.  AOC is also wrong on this.

  • Greyparrot
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    --> @Alec
    Don't ever tell a nevertrumper he is wrong. About anything.

  • TheDredPriateRoberts
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    --> @Swagnarok
    guy goes up to a librarian and asks if they have any books on paranoia, the librarian whispers......they're right behind you.
  • mustardness
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    --> @Greyparrot
    Doesn't matter. Earth will end in 12 years.
    OMG, is this the return 2012 Mayan end-of-time loonies?

    So this is 2019 and if we add 12 G-Parrot believes end of "Earth" is coming in year 2031.

    How do we arrive at this date?  Two terms of Terrible Trump is 8 years, plus one term of Apocalypse Pence?

    Ok, that does make some rational, logical common sense.  Parrots and other birds are known to fairly intelligent, even if not as intellignt as most cetacceans.



  • disgusted
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    --> @DBlaze
    What? It's not the Slumps fault that he didn't know he was calling white supremacist, neo nazis very fine people? How dumb is he?
  • DBlaze
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    --> @disgusted
    He was not referring to them, he was referring to the people that were there to protest erasing history by removing the statues.  Don't you know what they all were really there for?  Why they gathered in the first place?  The city was tearing down historic statues.

      I'm not a white supremacist and I didn't want the statues taken down.  It is a part of history and you cannot erase it.  There were people in the South that were fine people, they just had to fight because people were fighting them, killing brothers, and sisters and parents..  This is why the statues should not be brought down so people will understand what happened in the past....which you clearly do not... they also stand as an acknowledgement of what the country has overcome.  
  • Snoopy
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    Even in the days where racism was more accepted it had nothing to do with the Nazis.  You can't read into Nazi propaganda and apply it to the American struggle with historical slavery.  When the smoke cleared white supremacy (as we know it) became permanently obsolete as a political force in modern times, and it doesn't make sense to take that as your primary assumption in the first place.

  • mustardness
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    --> @Greyparrot
    Doesn't matter. Earth will end in 12 years.
    Even if G-Parrot 2031 concerns do not occur, we then have the UNIX Y2038 ---recall Y2K--- End Of UNIX Time

    ..."The latest time that can be represented in Unix's signed 32-bit integer time format is 03:14:07 on Tuesday, 19 January 2038 (231-1 = 2,147,483,647 seconds after 1 January 1970).[1]

    ...Times beyond that will wrap around and be stored internally as a negative number, which these systems will interpret as having occurred on 13 December 1901 rather than 19 January 2038.

    ....This is caused by integer overflow. The counter runs out of usable digit bits, flips the sign bit instead, and reports a maximally negative number (then continues to count up, to zero, and then up through the positive integers again). Resulting erroneous calculations on such systems are likely to cause problems for users and other reliant parties."
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    OMG, is this the return 2012 Mayan end-of-time loonies?
    Ok, that does make some rational, logical common sense.  Parrots and other birds are known to fairly intelligent, even if not as intellignt as most cetacceans.

  • TheRealNihilist
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    --> @DBlaze
    The city was tearing down historic statues.
    Statues like words only have the meaning you give it to them. If the meaning is more than what the society deems acceptable then I think there are right to take it down. Sure the people of the statues did great things but you can't just remove that they had slaves. That much of a problem still impacts to this day which is a justification for removing statues. I would hope it is done by professionals instead of students but I am not really bothered too much by that if no-one is harmed by the process.
    It is a part of history and you cannot erase it. 
    You can't erase history by removing a statue. Even if we forget about history. History is still the same but people don't remember. 
    This is why the statues should not be brought down so people will understand what happened in the past....which you clearly do not... they also stand as an acknowledgement of what the country has overcome.  
    Is it worth remembering and why do the United States needs statues since all this is recorded in books?

  • Snoopy
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    --> @TheRealNihilist
    Even if we forget about history

    The question it may seem.  Do we really want to forget, or what do we really want to forget?  If its not handed down, the people are losing something that they won't get back from a book.  That's really a local matter as you say
  • TheRealNihilist
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    --> @Snoopy
     Do we really want to forget, or what do we really want to forget?
    I would advise the person to take a picture from it. I doubt there is a large audience going through their national park waiting and spending time as an occasional occurence. I think when someone sees the statue once they don't really need to stand and see it twice but with a book it does require multiple readings or a very in-depth reading in order to understand everything about what is said. A statue can do very little but a book can have many words.
    If its not handed down, the people are losing something that they won't get back from a book
    The value of the statue is less than the value of that same person in a book. So I would be more opposed over book burning than statue demolition. I would be annoyed if the statue looked really nice but it is a statue not a book. 
  • Snoopy
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    --> @TheRealNihilist
    Shall we remove the Washington Monument and tear down the estate as well?
  • TheRealNihilist
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    --> @Snoopy
    Shall we remove the Washington Monument 
    It looks nice and I did see Spider-Man Homecoming where he had an action scene with the monument but I don't really care too much about a statue. I would be kind of annoyed if was taken down because it does look nice but it doesn't impact me apart from when I saw it in a movie. 
    tear down the estate as well?
    Can you be specific about this one? What estate? 
  • Snoopy
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    --> @TheRealNihilist
    I'm referring to the home at Mt. Vernon.  You can still tour it today

  • TheRealNihilist
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    --> @Snoopy
    I'm referring to the home at Mt. Vernon.  You can still tour it today
    If people wanted it sure. Does look nice but if society deems his accomplishment not worth showcasing in his home then relegated to only books. I am fine with that. 


  • Snoopy
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    --> @TheRealNihilist
    What do you mean by society in this context?  Why demolish it rather than transferring into private care? 
  • TheRealNihilist
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    --> @Snoopy
    What do you mean by society in this context?
    If people within the country or city say we don't want and have a good reason for demolishing it then so be it.
    Why demolish it rather than transferring into private care?  
    Why make the distinction between public and private care? 
  • DBlaze
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    --> @TheRealNihilist
    The statues work as a catalyst to read the history books.  When someone sees the statues and hear's a bit of the story behind them, it interests them and they want to know more about it, they will gain interest in reading the history books.  When I was a kid, I did exactly that when I saw the statues, I asked questions like... Who is that person on the horse?  My parents would answer and I would have more knowledge, then I would want to read about what happened.

    That will no longer happen. If you get rid of the statues, you might as well burn the books too, because that is all it is, trying to erase history and believing that all of the South were evil people getting what they deserved, and forgetting that the north was just as bad in the way they treated blacks, even worse in some cases..

    You might as well remove every statue that was built in homage to slave owners, which is most of them.   
  • TheRealNihilist
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    --> @DBlaze
    The statues work as a catalyst to read the history books.
    Depends on the value society has for it. The young generation I am sure were the people who were destroying the statues so the young of that area if were less into vandalism I think would just simply asked the relevant authority to take it down. Since the young are the future generation that would take the place of the old it would have been removed anyway if they cared enough to destroy it later on in their life.
    Who is that person on the horse?  My parents would answer and I would have more knowledge, then I would want to read about what happened.
    Not the best way of doing things. Movies and books are better. It has more information and if the child doesn't like reading show him a picture. That picture is like a statue but covers less space and can invoke the same reaction. Children are not really too rational so I don't see the point in pleasing them to the detriment of younger people who are going to be replacing the old much sooner.
    That will no longer happen. If you get rid of the statues, you might as well burn the books too
    Don't see the point. Books offer more than a statue so I want to see it to believe it. This is also a slippery slope fallacy. If A happens then it can lead to B happening therefore we shouldn't do A. Not saying how destroying statues is bad instead saying it can lead to something else. 
    trying to erase history and believing that all of the South were evil people getting what they deserved, and forgetting that the north was just as bad in the way they treated blacks, even worse in some cases..
    History is not being erased. They are only statues. Many books I am sure have been written on the topic that have gone into much more depth than a statue could ever. If they really wanted to erase history it would be the burning of books as a primary source and advocating for the government to remove any existence of these people from the internet.
    You might as well remove every statue that was built in homage to slave owners, which is most of them.   
    Fine then. Statues are not the best source of information and not even close. So it is mainly aesthetics. The best argument you came up with for not destroying statues was that a child might be interested in history because of the statue and a slippery slope fallacy of it can lead burning books so we shouldn't destroy statues. It really goes to show how little value the statues have.
  • Snoopy
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    --> @TheRealNihilist

    Omar: if society deems his accomplishment not worth showcasing
    Why Demolish it rather than transferring into private care?
    Omar: Why make the distinction between public and private care?
    In this instance, I was unsure what society means but could still infer that it referred to a majority populous.  I am positive that there will always be some degree of interest in the estate so there is an inherent choice in the hypothetical.  I thought something to the effect "Should public officials, being independent of representing the interest, destroy the property that the minority of people value, or account for that value?"

    I believe in reality it is privately owned already, but could be wrong.