Is Repulsion At The Homosexual Act Bigotry?

Author: ethang5

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2. Or can a person be repulsed (by the act, not the person) and not be a bigot at all?

3. Is repulsion at the homosexual act a learned response or is it biological?

4. If a man is repulsed at the sexual act between two men, but feels attracted at the sexual act between two women, is that bigotry?
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1. Repulsion at the act is not bigotry.

2. You can be repulsed without being a bigot.

3. I think it's completely cultural, so I'd say learned.

4. No, being turned off by two dudes but turned on by two women is not bigotry either. The whole point is that we have little control over what we're sexually attracted to, and so long as it's fantasy or an act between consenting adults, it's amoral and no one else's business.
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@ethang5
2. No. Homosexual people often say they are repulsed by heterosexual acts. If that is not bigotry, then the reverse is not either.

3. The jury is still out on the degree to which repulsion of homosexual acts is learned versus biological. Just as the degree of revulsion varies between individuals, the source of that revulsion may vary too.

4. No. That is just an aspect of one's sexual orientation, which is beyond one's control. 
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4. No...
OK. If a person is repulsed by to men, but attracted to two women, can't to be said that it isn't homosexuality he is repulsed at? For it is homosexuality in both cases of the two men and the two women.

So how is it not bigotry to be repulsed at one act of homosexuality but not at the same act performed by others?
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@ethang5
So how is it not bigotry to be repulsed at one act of homosexuality but not at the same act performed by others?
So far no one has gone along with the idea that being repulsed by acts of homosexuality sex is bigotry at all.  I'd have said it's not being repulsed that makes someone a bigot; it's the desire to impose one's views on everyone else that defines a bigot.

Lots of straights wouldn't do gay sex themseleves but aren't bothered by what gays do in private - that is not bigotry. 


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@ethang5
- One would say it's male homosexuality he's repulsed at.

- Does this guy have superhuman control over what he finds arousing or repulsive? If not, then no, it's not bigotry.
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@Castin
So, short of physical action, can anything be bigotry? What then is homosexual bigotry?
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@keithprosser
So far no one has gone along with the idea that being repulsed by acts of homosexuality sex is bigotry at all.
That is interesting because in my experience, any expression of revulsion at homosexual acts has immediately garnered the charge of bigotry.
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@ethang5
Bigotry in this context would be maligning and devaluing the homosexual as a person simply for what they do in their bedroom that you find repulsing.
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@Castin
That would seem to include telling the homosexual you find his act repulsive. Would not a homosexual feel maligned and devalued at you feeling that way about them?

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@ethang5
A homosexual who is not a hypocrite would say you can't control your sexuality and your involuntary responses alone do not make you a bad person, although I feel they'd be in their rights to ask you why you felt the need to make a comment on their sex life. Bit personal.
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I smell a slippery slope here. "Repulsion" can, colloquially cover a lot of ground.
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@drafterman
We haven't yet heard eth allude to anything beyond the simple feeling of revulsion itself.
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@Castin
Really?

ethang5: "any expression of revulsion at homosexual" (Emphasis mine).

I'll also note that both "revulsion" and "repulsion" are, historically, action words. While I don't discount there being a completely internalized and passive feeling of revulsion or repulsion, we also ignore the fact that there is commonly an outward element to these words as well. Compare and contrast with similar emotions of "disgust".
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@ethang5
Shut up and get over it. Your disgust doesn't mean a damn thing. I have had it up to the fucking hilt with you Judeo-Christian homophobes and your BS.

If it disgusts you so much that men kiss and do so much more together and stroke each other as they embrace and love one another on a physical level then get over it. Get over it, you little safe-space-hating-hypocrites; what so when it's two gays you need a safe space to have a panic attack?

When it suits your kind you want your emotions tended to but then when 'snowflakes' want tender love and care from society you shit on them.

Na, I've had enough of your right-wing BS, it's about time someone put you in your god damn place you putrid oxymoron jokes of an attempt at political-stance-holding.
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@RationalMadman
That is interesting because in my experience, any expression of revulsion at homosexual acts has immediately garnered the charge of bigotry.

Shut up and get over it. Your disgust doesn't mean a damn thing. I have had it up to the fucking hilt with you Judeo-Christian homophobes and your BS.
Exhibit A.

Compare and contrast with similar emotions of "disgust".
Exhibit B
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@ethang5
It is not bigotry. Bigotry means you are intolerant. You can find something personally repulsive, but tolerate it. For instance, I might not like broccoli. But I am not going to tell others they should not eat it, or discriminate against them because they do, even if I don't understand how anyone could like broccoli.

Personally I find sex between two men a complete turn off.  But I don't think it is immoral if it is between consenting adults, and I am certainly not going to deny others the right. Frankly, what others do behind closed doors is none of my business, as long as no one gets hurt.
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@ethang5
I don't recall issuing a charge of bigotry at you. But whatever nails you want to attach yourself to that cross, go for it.
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@ethang5
Will you want a left-wing safe space to cope?
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@RationalMadman
No. Just to be rid of your stupidity. Is that too much to ask?
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@drafterman
I used those nails to stop me going down that "slippery slope" you saw. Thanks for the permission.
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@drafterman
I used those nails to stop me going down that "slippery slope" you saw. Thanks for the permission.
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@ethang5
I will leave this thread out of my Social Democrat respect for the distress I'm causing you.

You should have your safe space because you are a snowflake with your own needs and anxieties and that's totally fine. I will leave you in peace. Let this be a lesson.
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@ethang5
Instead of snark, it'd be better to expand on what you mean. Are you talking about a completely passive, internalized emotional feeling or are you talking about reacting to and acting upon that feeling for this scenario?
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@RationalMadman
I will leave this thread out of my Social Democrat respect for the distress I'm causing you.
That or you realized you responded like a militant idiot. But thanks. And the "distress" you imagine causing me thanks you too.

Be careful now. You said you learned your lesson with zeichen. Most already doubt you did.

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@drafterman
Instead of snark, it'd be better to expand on what you mean.

I always respond to intelligent civil questions respectfully.

:Are you talking about a completely passive, internalized emotional feeling or are you talking about reacting to and acting upon that feeling for this scenario?

Your question is curious, cause I only spoke about a completely passive, internalized emotional feeling. Why would I need to clarify things I did not say or imply?

The question I asked makes sense only if the revulsion is limited to how the observer feels.

But note the case with RM, his SJW was already outraged and fuming about homophobia. This is a typical response, more common in liberals and progressives.
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Your question is curious, cause I only spoke about a completely passive, internalized emotional feeling. Why would I need to clarify things I did not say or imply?

I disagree that revulsion and repulsion are limited internalized emotional feelings. They can be, sure, but based on the use of the words alone, some sort of reaction, or outward expression of that emotion is certainly within their meanings, especially when you later say:

"expression of revulsion"

I don't see how an expression can be passive or internalized. If it's internal, what are you expressing?
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@drafterman
An internal feeling can cause an involuntary frown, gasp, shout, or trembling. One could also express his revulsion to say, his wife in the privacy of his home. 

The question is, does that feeling of revulsion make one a bigot? This isn't rocket science. As a liberal, I know your inner SWJ has been awoken, and you will now do a bloodhound trying to find the bigot you are certain is behind the question.
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@ethang5
An internal feeling can cause an involuntary frown, gasp, shout, or trembling. One could also express his revulsion to say, his wife in the privacy of his home. 
I agree! An internal feeling can cause an outward expression, even an involuntary one (though usually mature adults are able to maintain composure). And people can make voluntary outward expressions to a private audience in a private setting.

So, again, what are we talking about? Are we talking about only the internalized feeling of emotion, or are we including the outward expressions of emotion?


The question is, does that feeling of revulsion make one a bigot?
I don't think a passive feeling makes a person a  bigot. But here is the thing: every time we appear to be settled on the passive, internal side of the equation, you start sneaking expressing that emotion. Once we start making outward expressions, the answer changes. My real question is: if we aren't talking about the outward expressions, why do you keep bringing them up?
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@drafterman
>I agree! An internal feeling can cause an outward expression, even an involuntary one (though usually mature adults are able to maintain composure).

If it is involuntary, then the person has no moral judgement to answer for.

>And people can make voluntary outward expressions to a private audience in a private setting.

Good.

>So, again, what are we talking about? Are we talking about only the internalized feeling of emotion, or are we including the outward expressions of emotion?

Why would we exclude the involuntary action the emotion may cause? And how does expressing the emotion in confidence change the situation?

>you start sneaking expressing that emotion. 

Your choice of the word "sneaking" betrays your PC liberalism. If for example, an emotion makes me cry, why would we need to separate the emotion from the crying?

>Once we start making outward expressions, the answer changes.

How? If the emotion itself does not make one a bigot, how does telling someone about the emotion do that?

>My real question is: if we aren't talking about the outward expressions, why do you keep bringing them up?

I didn't bring them up slick. You did, and you have kept bringing them up in each of your posts. Whether the emotion is expressed, involuntarily or later voluntarily, how does that change the implication of the emotion itself?

Is your trigger finger itching?