2 questions

Author: TheRealNihilist ,

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  • TheRealNihilist
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    Do you think knowledge equals happiness if so can you demonstrate it?
    (Please be short and simple)

    Do you think happiness can be attained doing something over and over again or does it require the person to vary things up in order to maintain happiness?
    (Explain as well)

    Thanks in advance. 
  • janesix
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    --> @TheRealNihilist
    I don't think knowledge equals happiness. 

    Happiness is fleeting, based in the feelings of the moment.
  • TheRealNihilist
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    --> @janesix
    Okay. 

27 days later

  • A-R-O-S-E
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    Knowledge helps less bad things happen and therefore makes you happier.

    Sure, you can be happy doing the same thing over and over. I'd like having a friend and seeing them every day or getting starbucks weekly.
  • TheRealNihilist
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    --> @A-R-O-S-E
    Knowledge helps less bad things happen and therefore makes you happier.
    Knowledge leads to uncomfortable truths like absurdism and everything being arbitrary. If that isn't enough how we see gender is very arbitrary and should be abolished if we cared actually calling people thing they are not what we think they are.

  • Athias
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    @TheRealNihilist

    Do you think knowledge equals happiness if so can you demonstrate it?
    (Please be short and simple)

    Happiness is a gauge of value. The more value you place on knowledge, the happier it will make you.

    Do you think happiness can be attained doing something over and over again or does it require the person to vary things up in order to maintain happiness?
    (Explain as well)
    Using the premise above, it depends on that which you value: novelty or routine? In my opinion, they both have value--though I believe routine may edge out as it provides comfort and safety.
  • TheRealNihilist
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    @Athias

    I unblocked you.

    Agree on your first answer.
    Do you think value can be changed easily and how much do you think people value knowledge? A percentage would be fine.

    Routine I think is different then doing the same thing over and over again. A routine can be talking to new people. That is a routine but would lead to different results not the same.
  • Athias
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    --> @TheRealNihilist
    Do you think value can be changed easily and how much do you think people value knowledge? A percentage would be fine.
    I honestly wouldn't know. What do they say: "knowledge is power," but "ignorance is bliss"? As for values, of that too I'm also ignorant. Some people's values change easily, while others don't--it seems redundant, I know. Can't really put a percentage on it unless I have some sense of the entire sample, which comprises of billions of people. Even if we were to do it by country, we're still talking millions.

    Routine I think is different then doing the same thing over and over again. A routine can be talking to new people. That is a routine but would lead to different results not the same.
    One can broaden a routine, but that doesn't make it any less a routine. For example, one sets a routine to wake up in the morning at 6 a.m., jog, eat breakfast, shower, leave for work at 8 a.m., work, talk to someone new, and return home. While talking to someone new would shake things up a bit, one sort of gives up forming intimate relationships because one's routine is to repeat a sense of novelty. That would be novelty for only novelty's sake.
  • TheRealNihilist
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    What do they say: "knowledge is power," but "ignorance is bliss"?
    Power doesn't equal happiness.
    Bliss would leave out happiness achieved while being informed.
    One can broaden a routine, but that doesn't make it any less a routine.
    Routine: a sequence of actions regularly followed.

    I guess so. I think it is puts an unfair burden on the other side when routine can simply be doing a thing that is very broad. 


  • EarnsTurns
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    Do you think knowledge equals happiness if so can you demonstrate it?
    Yes.  Knowledge is the result of a pursuit insofar as inquiry is a pursuit.  Knowledge being the "accomplishment" of the pursuit means that accomplishment and knowledge are in a sense interchangeable.  Accomplishment has been linked to happiness in many studies.

    Do you think happiness can be attained doing something over and over again or does it require the person to vary things up in order to maintain happiness?
    (Explain as well)
    Sure; I think that's why people play video games, watch movies over and over again, are avid surfers/skiers/mountain bikers, etc...these activities bring joy and create external bonds with the characters, people, and places they enjoy those activities with/in and thus transform joy into the more abstract concept of happiness. 

  • zedvictor4
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    --> @TheRealNihilist
    There's a distinction to be made between happiness and contentment. Happiness is a random momentary occurrence, whereas contentment is the continuous state of mind that we should all probably aspire to achieve.

    Though both are acquired data constructs rather than inherent states.

    Therefore assumed states of mind that exceed base function are reliant on the acquisition of knowledge.

    So happiness is resultant of knowledge. But that is not to say that the acquisition of knowledge will necessarily evoke happiness