I support the Islamic hijjab -for muslim women- , why , and how

Author: Lunar108 ,

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Hijjab in islam is mandatory on every adult Muslim woman  , many muslims and muslim activists claim that islam is being attacked whenever hijjab is banned ,
and I have the solution for that , its actually just copying IRAN which is basically whenever a muslim woman leave her house without hijjab give her a fine 
that way you'll get multiple benefits which include:
1.increase the revenue of the country 
2.muslim women themselves will get out of there homes and ask that hijjab get banned 
this will get muslim women to fight against hijjab , and will prove that many muslim women don't want to wear hijjab in the west  
"
Is it mandatory to wear hijab in Islam?


Modern Muslim scholars believe that it is obligatory in Islamic law that women abide by the rules of hijab (as outlined in their respective school of thought).
"
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It's honestly odd. They think just because the desert dwelling Muhammed wore desert clothes, that they should as well. It's just a random low IQ take by Muslims who haven't actually studied the Koran 
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I do believe they have a right to their low IQ take and should be allowed to wear hijabs though
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hijabs wont solve anything, I can't do anything against hijabs themselves and to be honest I don't see them as a problem, I CAN advocate for no muslim immigrant as islam is incompatible with western civilization
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It's honestly odd. They think just because the desert dwelling Muhammed wore desert clothes, that they should as well.
- Much less odd than believing the desert dwelling Jesus is God incarnate though...What even more odd is the disturbing Western obsession over this extraordinary garment! 


It's just a random low IQ take by Muslims who haven't actually studied the Koran 
- This must feel like a high IQ take by a Christian who has actually studied the Quran... 

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hijabs wont solve anything, I can't do anything against hijabs themselves and to be honest I don't see them as a problem, I CAN advocate for no muslim immigrant as islam is incompatible with western civilization
- Post-modernist Western civilization, absolutely. Get those Muslims out, else they be a hindrance to the progressive project.

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- Examples of footage of women in England wearing Hijab not even a 100 years ago, before Feminism. Hijab, or head covering, was the norm -& still is- among free women or noble women in all human societies (except the post-modernist West & the like).
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uch less odd than believing the desert dwelling Jesus is God incarnate though...What even more odd is the disturbing Western obsession over this extraordinary garment! 
I don't care if they wear one. None of my business. I'm not obsessed. I was just saying it i strictly utilitarian for a desert environment and not something Muhhamed would have considered religious garb

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I don't care if they wear one. None of my business. I'm not obsessed. I was just saying it i strictly utilitarian for a desert environment
- Yet, pre-Islamic desert Arab women did not wear head covering... despite the fact that Arab women in Rome & Persia did. Funny fact, Arab women used to go around the Kaaba fully naked to perform repentance. Until the beloved Prophet (pbuh) came & banned that practice. The more you know...


and not something MUHAMMED would have considered religious garb
- Actually there is no mention of Hijab (as head covering) in the Quran or the Hadith, or the first 13 centuries of Islam. It's a pretty recent terminology. The issue is about Awrah (private body), i.e. that which must be kept private. The person's 'private body' varies from nothing to the entire body, depending on the age, status, gender, practice, environment & legal school of said person, & also on the age, gender, sexuality, faith, relationship & decency of the others around. – which makes a very long & complicated list of rulings. The designation of 'Hijab' as a head covering is, in fact, a 19th century invention to push back against Colonial allegations accusing Muslim women of being oppressed by men to cover their heads. This was back when European women had no property rights, no divorce rights, no contraception rights, no education rights, no vote rights, no inheritance rights... & so on, contrary to their Muslim counterparts... I guess the only thing the dumb Colonials could feel good about is how the "oppressed" Muslim women wore head-scarves while their "free" women wore fancy hats. 

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guess the only thing the dumb Colonials could feel good about is how the "oppressed" Muslim women wore head-scarves while their "free" women wore fancy hats. 
If Muslims are not oppressing women, they are making a big mistake. Look at what happened to the west when they stopped oppressing women. Women are statistically less happy now, more divorced and bigger sluts. 

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If Muslims are not oppressing women, they are making a big mistake. Look at what happened to the west when they stopped oppressing women. Women are statistically less happy now, more divorced and bigger sluts. 
- LOL! The West did not stop oppressing women, they just went from one type of oppression to another. In the 19th century, even much of the 20th century, you still had chivalry; men took care of women & protected their family. Commitment & devotion between husband & wife were the norm. 

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Commitment and devotion, taking care and protecting and all that stuff you just espoused.


So hypothetically Yas.

If your Brother raped your wife.

Who would you embrace first?

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yassine
so obsessed with the west , quite funny how muslim women in IRAN are fighting for their rights of NOT WEARING HIJJAB some of them are even getting attacked for it , while muslim women in the west are fighting to wear hijjab 
If we force it on them the same way that IRAN do , or like how islam made it mandatory for women to wear it , they will fight to be freed from it 
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- Yet, pre-Islamic desert Arab women did not wear head covering... despite the fact that Arab women in Rome & Persia did. Funny fact, Arab women used to go around the Kaaba fully naked to perform repentance. Until the beloved Prophet (pbuh) came & banned that practice. The more you know...

nice , empty claims with no evidence , I would love it if you could provide a hadith or a book , or any thing supporting this story 
- Actually there is no mention of Hijab (as head covering) in the Quran or the Hadith, or the first 13 centuries of Islam. It's a pretty recent terminology. The issue is about Awrah (private body), i.e. that which must be kept private. The person's 'private body' varies from nothing to the entire body, depending on the age, status, gender, practice, environment & legal school of said person, & also on the age, gender, sexuality, faith, relationship & decency of the others around. – which makes a very long & complicated list of rulings. The designation of 'Hijab' as a head covering is, in fact, a 19th century invention to push back against Colonial allegations accusing Muslim women of being oppressed by men to cover their heads. This was back when European women had no property rights, no divorce rights, no contraception rights, no education rights, no vote rights, no inheritance rights... & so on, contrary to their Muslim counterparts... I guess the only thing the dumb Colonials could feel good about is how the "oppressed" Muslim women wore head-scarves while their "free" women wore fancy hats. 
so al the muslim scholars/shiekhs/imams are wrong when they want women to wear hijjab and you're right.

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The Qur'an instructs both Muslim men and women to dress in a modest way, yet there is disagreement on how these instructions should be followed. The verses relating to dress use the terms khimār (veil) and jilbāb (a dress or cloak) rather than ḥijāb.[7] Of the more than 6,000 verses in the Quran, about half a dozen refer specifically to the way a woman should dress and walk in public.
The clearest verse on the requirement of modest dress is Surah 24:31, telling women to guard their genitalia and draw their khimār over their bosoms.[25][26]
And say to the believing women that they should lower their gaze and guard their private parts; that they should not display their beauty and ornaments except what (must ordinarily) appear thereof; that they should draw their khimār over their breasts and not display their beauty except to their husband, their fathers, their husband's fathers, their sons, their husbands' sons, their brothers or their brothers' sons, or their sisters' sons, or their women, or the slaves whom their right hands possess, or male servants free of physical needs, or small children who have no sense of the shame of sex; and that they should not strike their feet in order to draw attention to their hidden ornaments.
— Quran 24:31
In Surah 33:59 Muhammad is commanded to ask his family members and other Muslim women to wear outer garments when they go out, so that they are not harassed:[26]
O Prophet! Enjoin your wives, your daughters, and the wives of true believers that they should cast their outer garments over their persons (when abroad): That is most convenient, that they may be distinguished and not be harassed.
— Quran 33:59
hadith
The hadith sources specify the details of hijab (Islamic rules of dress) for men and women, exegesis of the Qur'anic verses narrated by sahabah, and are a major source which Muslim legal scholars used to derive their rulings.[29][30][31]
  • Narrated Umm Salama Hind bint Abi Umayya, Ummul Mu'minin: "When the verse 'That they should cast their outer garments over their breasts' was revealed, the women of Ansar came out as if they had crows hanging down over their heads by wearing outer garments." 32:4090. Abū Dawud classed this hadith as authentic.-sahih-
  • Narrated Safiya bint Shaiba: "Aisha used to say: 'When (the Verse): "They should draw their veils (khimaar) over their breasts (juyyub)," was revealed, (the ladies) cut their waist sheets at the edges and veiled themselves (Arabic: فَاخْتَمَرْنَ, lit. 'to put on a hijab') with the cut pieces.'" Sahih al-Bukhari6:60:28232:4091. This hadith is often translated as "...and covered their heads and faces with the cut pieces of cloth,"[32] as the Arabic word used in the text (Arabic: فَاخْتَمَرْنَ) could include or exclude the face and there was ikhtilaf on whether covering the face is farḍ, or obligatory. The most prominent sharh, or explanation, of Sahih Bukhari is Fatḥ al-Bārī which states this included the face.
  • Yahya related to me from Malik from Muhammad ibn Zayd ibn Qunfudh that his mother asked Umm Salama, the wife of the Prophet, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, "What clothes can a woman wear in prayer?" She said, "She can pray in the khimār (headscarf) and the diri' (Arabic: الدِّرْعِ, lit. 'shield, armature', transl. 'a woman's garment') that reaches down and covers the top of her feet." Muwatta Imam Malik book 8 hadith 37.
  • Aishah narrated that Allah's Messenger said: "The Salat (prayer) of a woman who has reached the age of menstruation is not accepted without a khimār." Jami` at-Tirmidhi 377.
===========================================================================================================================
is sahih al bukhari wrong ? yassine 
or is the hadith deemed Abū Dawud classed this hadith as authentic.-sahih- wrong ?
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- Examples of footage of women in England wearing Hijab not even a 100 years ago, before Feminism. Hijab, or head covering, was the norm -& still is- among free women or noble women in all human societies (except the post-modernist West & the like).
Veiling did not originate with the advent of Islam. Statuettes depicting veiled priestesses date back as far as 2500 BC.[72] Elite women in ancient Mesopotamia and in the Byzantine, Greek, and Persian empires wore the veil as a sign of respectability and high status.[73] In ancient Mesopotamia, Assyria had explicit sumptuary laws detailing which women must veil and which women must not, depending upon the woman's class, rank, and occupation in society.[73] Female slaves and prostitutes were forbidden to veil and faced harsh penalties if they did so.[7] Veiling was thus not only a marker of aristocratic rank, but also served to "differentiate between 'respectable' women and those who were publicly available".[7][73]
Strict seclusion and the veiling of matrons were also customary in ancient Greece. Between 550 and 323 BCE, prior to Christianity, respectable women in classical Greek society were expected to seclude themselves and wear clothing that concealed them from the eyes of strange men.[74] Roman pagan custom included the practice of the head covering worn by the priestesses of Vesta (Vestal Virgins).[75]
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In Iran some women act to transform the hijab by challenging the regime subsequently reinventing culture and women's identity within Iran. The female Iranian fashion designer, Naghmeh Kiumarsi, challenges the regime's notion of culture through publicly designing, marketing, and selling clothing pieces that feature tight fitting jeans, and a “skimpy” headscarf.[107] Kiumarsi embodies her own notion of culture and identity and utilizes fashion to value the differences among Iranian women, as opposed to a single identity under the Islamic dress code and welcomes the evolution of Iranian culture with the emergence of new style choices and fashion trends.
Women's resistance in Iran is gaining traction as an increasing number of women challenge the mandatory wearing of the hijab. Smith (2017) addressed the progress that Iranian women have made in her article, “Iran surprises by realizing Islamic dress code for women,”[108] published by The Times, a reputable news organization based in the UK. The Iranian government has enforced their penal dress codes less strictly and instead of imprisonment as a punishment have implemented mandatory reform classes in the liberal capital, Tehran. General Hossein Rahimi, the Tehran's police chief stated, “Those who do not observe the Islamic dress code will no longer be taken to detention centers, nor will judicial cases be filed against them” (Smith, 2017). The remarks of Tehran's recent police chief in 2017 reflect political progress in contrast with the remarks of Tehran's 2006 police chief.[108][109] Iranian women activists have made a headway since 1979 relying on fashion to enact cultural and political change.
Critics of forcing women to wear a headscarf label this practice as Islamofascist.[110] Critics of the hijab such as Masih Alinejad also see it as discriminatory to women.[111]
Lunar108
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Salam, I have been wearing hijab for 11 years and the past 6-7 years of them have been a struggle, both spiritually and emotionally. I don't believe it is obligatory to wear it at all having looked time and time again at the Quranic verse, which clearly talks about covering the cleavage, not the hair. God does not mince his words - if it was meant to be obligatory, it would have been clearly commanded, not phrased the way it is in the Quran as in take your "khimar" and cover your chest. I have been on and off about removing it, because I worry that I am letting my own ego and desires cloud my judgment on this, but at the same time in my heart of hearts I just do not believe it is obligatory, more cultural - modest dress is what is obligatory, which will be coloured by the culture in which you live. Even when I wore it, I did it more for my parents who expected it from me, and I didn't want to disappoint, not because I truly believed in it.
Wa alaikum as Salam!
Thank you for your question and for sharing your concern, may Allah (S) reward you for your courage and for being honest with yourself! I’m going to first put forth the Islamic mandates that refer to hijab and then address your second point on wearing hijab out of parental expectation.
There is clear and decisive scholarly consensus (ijma`) on the mandate of hijab. The general ayah governing the head covering is in Surah Al Ahzab, verse 59 where Allah (S) states,
{يا أَيُّهَا النَّبِيُّ قُل لِّأَزْوَاجِكَ وَبَنَاتِكَ وَنِسَاء الْمُؤْمِنِينَ يُدْنِينَ عَلَيْهِنَّ مِن جَلَابِيبِهِنَّ ذَلِكَ أَدْنَى أَن يُعْرَفْنَ فَلَا يُؤْذَيْنَ وَكَانَ اللَّهُ غَفُوراً رَّحِيماً. {الأحزاب: 59
“O Prophet, tell your wives and your daughters and the women of the believers to lower over themselves a portion of their jilbabs. That is more suitable that they will be known and not be harmed. And ever is Allah Forgiving and Merciful.”
The word, jilbab in this context should not be interpreted by the modern usage of the word. According to the Lisan al Arab (quintessential Arabic dictionary) jilbab in this context refers to the khimar or headscarf. This verse specifically states that we wear the headscarf in order to be known and recognized as believing women and to be protected.
Furthermore, in Surah Noor, Ayah 31, Allah (S) states,

“And tell the believing women to reduce [some] of their vision (i.e. lower the gaze) and guard their private parts and not expose their adornment except that which [necessarily] appears thereof and to wrap [a portion of] their headcovers (walyathdribna bikhumurihina alla juyoobihina) over their chests and not expose their adornment except to their husbands, their fathers, their husbands' fathers, their sons, their husbands' sons, their brothers, their brothers' sons, their sisters' sons, their women, that which their right hands possess, or those male attendants having no physical desire, or children who are not yet aware of the private aspects of women. And let them not stamp their feet to make known what they conceal of their adornment. And turn to Allah in repentance, all of you, O believers, that you might succeed.”
You are absolutely right in that Allah (S) does not mince words, but this ayah does not simply mean to, “take your khimar and cover your chest,” as you put it. The context in which the verse was revealed must be understood in order to fully comprehend the ayah.
According to Abu Abdullah Qurtubi, the 13th century mufassir (scholar who interprets the Quran), women at the time of the revelation wore their headcovers tied back behind their necks; leaving the upper chest, neck and ears bare as was the practice of the Christians at the time, as well as exposing the opening (singular jayb, plural juyub translated as “chests” in the above verse) at the top of the dress. The Quranic revelation confirmed the practice of covering the head, understood from the use of the word khimar in the verse, (which means headcovering, which was already in practice) but also explained that the custom of the time was not sufficient and that women were henceforth to tie the existing headcover in front and let it drape down to conceal the throat and the dress opening at the top.
 
When you speak of the hijab as a cultural practice, indeed it is a religious cultural practice that pre-dates Islam as there is clear evidence that Christian and Jewish women before Islam wore some sort of head-covering. (The tradition was practiced by Christian women until the 20th century, read more.) Islam perfected this practice when Allah (S) revealed the above verse, mandating that the existing head covering was to cover more than just the hair - but the neck, upper chest and ears as well.
Allah (S) gave us clear reasoning from the ayah above as to why we wear hijab – in order to be known. Quoting Anse Tamara Gray in her article, "Lean In - Our Feminist Manifesto” (which I highly recommend you read in full), 
“Like a sports team – We recognize each other. Like an ethnic background – we feel comfortable with each other. Like a flag held high in the field of battle – we bravely go out each day – in every country of the world – and represent our Prophet ﷺ – our religion. We represent our men, who too often blend into the background, and we represent our hurting women who need our activism. We represent any woman of faith unsure how to outwardly express her conviction. We wear the scarf that we may be known.
The second part of the verse, ‘that we may not be harmed’, is not a guarantee of a flawless life. It does not mean you will not receive hurtful words from an ignorant soul; it does not mean you won’t be mocked, or even that you won’t be oppressed. Indeed, if we look to the prophetic example we understand that neither men nor women ran from physical pain, or life-threatening situations. If we look at Mecca and then later at Medina, women easily put themselves in danger to defend their faith; they did it with the approval and support of the Prophet ﷺ – women at battle like Um Salamah and Nusaibah bint Ka’b, women on missions like Asma bint Abi Bakr and Rufaidah al Aslamiyyah, women who fearlessly spoke the truth and risked personal hardship like Um Sulaim, and women who risked their emotional wellbeing like Zainab bint Muhammad ﷺ.
When the verse was revealed, {that the women should close their scarves at the dress slit} [al Nūr: 31], it is narrated by ʿᾹʾishah (R) that the women tore their embroidered fabric, fabric that was decorated with pictures of tents – in other words, fancy fabric that was more than likely of some value to the women, either in time spent embroidering or in money invested in purchasing. They tore this fabric and covered themselves with it. It is akin to the Muslims throwing their alcohol in the streets when the verse forbidding alcohol was revealed. No one ran around looking for a man to ask permission of, nor did they question their own interpretations of the verse. They understood. They followed through. They leaned in. And we follow in their footsteps when we too lean in and embrace this flag of our religion, this hijab."
Muslim women wear hijab because the Qur’an unambiguously orders us to, and there is no qualifying text or hadith or even any lexical possibility to show that the Qur’anic order might mean anything besides obligation. The ahadith all confirm this obligation and the vast majority of Muslim scholars are in unanimous agreement about it and have been from the time of the Prophet (S) down to today.
Now, it sounds as though you wore hijab simply because your parents expected you to, in your own words, "I did it more for my parents who expected it from me, and I didn't want to disappoint, not because I truly believed in it," and there’s nothing wrong with wearing hijab because it’s expected of you, but wearing hijab without conviction is like praying without wudu. Sure you’re doing the actions, but how much are you really benefitting from it? Personally, I myself wore hijab because it was expected of me, and it was fine. I didn’t have much conviction in wearing it but at the same time I was 13 years old. It wasn’t until college that I truly understood the meaning behind hijab – and actually felt it protecting me and setting me apart from other women. I watched as men would hit on other women as they walked by and put their heads down when I walked passed. I learned to appreciate hijab on a level that made me take ownership of the decision. It was no longer out of obligation or to please my parents, it was for myself. It was now between myself and Allah (S).
My advice to you is to take ownership of your hijab. Take the time to truly understand these ayat and the reason hijab was prescribed. Take the time to examine yourself and your own “ego and desires,” as you put it, and where this underlying doubt is coming from. Is it because vanity or love for dunya is getting the best of you? Do you feel like wearing hijab is bringing you down in some way? Think about what is at the root of these feelings and address them head-on. Make sincere du’a that Allah (S) opens your heart to the truth and continues to allow you to be honest with yourself. Of course, you always have us to lean on and we pray that you find the conviction in hijab your heart is seeking, with the help of Allah (S). 
Have a question? E-mail us at [email protected]! If you're thinking about wearing hijab, check out our style guide, check out our New Hijabi Starter Kit and get started here!
directly from muslim mouths 
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Out of curiosity, what's your opinion on public nudity?
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- Examples of footage of women in England wearing Hijab not even a 100 years ago, before Feminism. Hijab, or head covering, was the norm -& still is- among free women or noble women in all human societies (except the post-modernist West & the like).
your absolutely correct, I hate the western savior complex of trying to save women from islam. 

Western fashion was very modest until the 1920's
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 Post-modernist Western civilization, absolutely. Get those Muslims out, else they be a hindrance to the progressive project.

even in the past, Reconquista, malta, crusades, etc. It's not that I hate Islam per say, it's that we should stay seperate
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so obsessed with the west
- You're obsessed with Islam. All you do is "IZLAAM" & "MOOSE-LIMBS", why are you surprised when I respond with "West"...?


, quite funny how muslim women in IRAN are fighting for their rights of NOT WEARING HIJJAB some of them are even getting attacked for it , while muslim women in the west are fighting to wear hijjab 

- Those who want to wear it hate it when they're forced to remove it, & those who don't want to wear it don't like it when it's forced on them.


If we force it on them the same way that IRAN do , or like how islam made it mandatory for women to wear it , they will fight to be freed from it
- You don't have to, those who want to dress less will always protest against decency laws, like the 'free-the-nipple' nutters in the West. 


nice , empty claims with no evidence , I would love it if you could provide a hadith or a book , or any thing supporting this story 
- Do they spoon feed you your breakfast too...? 


- Actually there is no mention of Hijab (as head covering) in the Quran or the Hadith, or the first 13 centuries of Islam. It's a pretty recent terminology. The issue is about Awrah (private body), i.e. that which must be kept private. The person's 'private body' varies from nothing to the entire body, depending on the age, status, gender, practice, environment & legal school of said person, & also on the age, gender, sexuality, faith, relationship & decency of the others around. – which makes a very long & complicated list of rulings. The designation of 'Hijab' as a head covering is, in fact, a 19th century invention to push back against Colonial allegations accusing Muslim women of being oppressed by men to cover their heads. This was back when European women had no property rights, no divorce rights, no contraception rights, no education rights, no vote rights, no inheritance rights... & so on, contrary to their Muslim counterparts... I guess the only thing the dumb Colonials could feel good about is how the "oppressed" Muslim women wore head-scarves while their "free" women wore fancy hats. 
so al the muslim scholars/shiekhs/imams are wrong when they want women to wear hijjab and you're right.
- I am always right, yes. 'Hijab' is pop culture designation. The Fuqaha (jurists) do not talk about hijab or schmijab, they talk about Awrah (private body which MUST be covered) which, as I said, depends on the age, status, gender, practice, environment & legal school of the person concerned, & also on the age, gender, sexuality, faith, relationship & decency of the others around... Particularly:

  • Age: below 5 = has no private body – between 5 & puberty = private body is private parts (front & back) – above puberty = private body is idle body – old age = private body is indecent body.
  • Status: free = private body is idle body – slave = private body is indecent body – foreigner = private body is indecent body.
  • Gender: male = idle body is from the navel to the knee (minimal) to all except face, neck, arms & feet (maximal) – female = all except face, hands & feet (minimal) to all except eyes & hands (maximal).
  • Practice: worship = private body is idle body for women / private parts for men – habitual = private body is private parts.
  • Environment: alone = no private body – in private = private body is indecent body – in public = private body is idle body.
  • Others' age: below 5 = no private body, between 5 & puberty = private body is indecent body – above puberty = private body is idle body.
  • Others' gender: different sexes = private body is idle body – man with men = private body is minimal idle body – woman with women = private body is private parts.
  • Others' sexuality: straight = private body is idle body – gay = private body is indecent body.
  • Others' faith: Muslim = private body is as specified accordingly – non-Muslim = private body is idle body.
  • Others' relationship: with partner = no private body – with kin =  private body is indecent body – with others = private body is idle body.
  • Others' decency: with decent = private body as specified – with lewd = private body is idle body.


The Qur'an instructs both Muslim men and women to dress in a modest way, yet there is disagreement on how these instructions should be followed. The verses relating to dress use the terms khimār (veil) and jilbāb (a dress or cloak) rather than ḥijāb.[7] Of the more than 6,000 verses in the Quran, about half a dozen refer specifically to the way a woman should dress and walk in public.
The clearest verse on the requirement of modest dress is Surah 24:31, telling women to guard their genitalia and draw their khimār over their bosoms.[25][26]
And say to the believing women that they should lower their gaze and guard their private parts; that they should not display their beauty and ornaments except what (must ordinarily) appear thereof; that they should draw their khimār over their breasts and not display their beauty except to their husband, their fathers, their husband's fathers, their sons, their husbands' sons, their brothers or their brothers' sons, or their sisters' sons, or their women, or the slaves whom their right hands possess, or male servants free of physical needs, or small children who have no sense of the shame of sex; and that they should not strike their feet in order to draw attention to their hidden ornaments.
— Quran 24:31
In Surah 33:59 Muhammad is commanded to ask his family members and other Muslim women to wear outer garments when they go out, so that they are not harassed:[26]
O Prophet! Enjoin your wives, your daughters, and the wives of true believers that they should cast their outer garments over their persons (when abroad): That is most convenient, that they may be distinguished and not be harassed.
— Quran 33:59
hadith
The hadith sources specify the details of hijab (Islamic rules of dress) for men and women, exegesis of the Qur'anic verses narrated by sahabah, and are a major source which Muslim legal scholars used to derive their rulings.[29][30][31]
  • Narrated Umm Salama Hind bint Abi Umayya, Ummul Mu'minin: "When the verse 'That they should cast their outer garments over their breasts' was revealed, the women of Ansar came out as if they had crows hanging down over their heads by wearing outer garments." 32:4090. Abū Dawud classed this hadith as authentic.-sahih-
  • Narrated Safiya bint Shaiba: "Aisha used to say: 'When (the Verse): "They should draw their veils (khimaar) over their breasts (juyyub)," was revealed, (the ladies) cut their waist sheets at the edges and veiled themselves (Arabic: فَاخْتَمَرْنَ, lit. 'to put on a hijab') with the cut pieces.'" Sahih al-Bukhari6:60:28232:4091. This hadith is often translated as "...and covered their heads and faces with the cut pieces of cloth,"[32] as the Arabic word used in the text (Arabic: فَاخْتَمَرْنَ) could include or exclude the face and there was ikhtilaf on whether covering the face is farḍ, or obligatory. The most prominent sharh, or explanation, of Sahih Bukhari is Fatḥ al-Bārī which states this included the face.
  • Yahya related to me from Malik from Muhammad ibn Zayd ibn Qunfudh that his mother asked Umm Salama, the wife of the Prophet, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, "What clothes can a woman wear in prayer?" She said, "She can pray in the khimār (headscarf) and the diri' (Arabic: الدِّرْعِ, lit. 'shield, armature', transl. 'a woman's garment') that reaches down and covers the top of her feet." Muwatta Imam Malik book 8 hadith 37.
  • Aishah narrated that Allah's Messenger said: "The Salat (prayer) of a woman who has reached the age of menstruation is not accepted without a khimār." Jami` at-Tirmidhi 377.
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is sahih al bukhari wrong ? yassine 
or is the hadith deemed Abū Dawud classed this hadith as authentic.-sahih- wrong ?
- What is the point of all this??!! Are you trying to teach me my own Faith?! First of all, I don't see the word 'hijab' (as head-covering) in any Ayah or Hadith, for the simple reason that it does not exist. I will give you a 1000$ if you can find it. Second of all, the headscarf 'hijab' is a tiny component of the practice that is Hayaa (Modesty). What women (or men) must cover or not, as explained above, has to do with a lot of factors & depends on circumstances. It just so happens that an adult non-elderly free woman either in worship, or in the presence of adult straight men who aren't kin, must cover her idle body ('Awrah), thus her hair along with the rest of her body except the hands, feet & face.


- I don't care what Muslims say or do. Islam is God's religion, not some random opinions.
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your absolutely correct, I hate the western savior complex of trying to save women from islam. 
- Alright. 


Western fashion was very modest until the 1920's
- I'd say the 1950s. In the 1950s, exposing legs in public was still illegal in many places in the US.


even in the past, Reconquista, malta, crusades, etc. It's not that I hate Islam per say,
- What about Reconquista & the Crusades?


it's that we should stay seperate
- Exactly how? & why?
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I'd say the 1950s. In the 1950s, exposing legs in public was still illegal in many places in the US.

No, the 1920's created it with flapper, the roaring 20's, etc. US ww2 plane art was downright pornographic
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Those are examples of religious wars between Christians and Muslims. The religions are incompatible
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No, the 1920's created it with flapper, the roaring 20's, etc. US ww2 plane art was downright pornographic
- Yeah, but mostly in some cities, especially the West Coast. Indecency became norm after 1950s with the second-wave feminism & the sexual revolution, & became law in the 1980s. On that note, this women "freedom" nonsense originate in European & American lower class culture. With global Colonialism & the Progressive Era, Western societies have seen unprecedented influx of wealth from the early to mid 20th century. The "commoners" essentially jumped up a class & dominate the middle class, bringing their crude & vulgar culture with them. 


Those are examples of religious wars between Christians and Muslims. The religions are incompatible
- More like between Catholics & Muslims. Though, Catholic wrath touched literally everyone else, including other Christians, not just Muslims. Middle Eastern Christians co-exist with Muslims in harmony. Regardless, why does that matter today?! Most Europeans aren't even religious, let alone Christian, let alone Catholic!


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yassine 
- I don't care what Muslims say or do. Islam is God's religion, not some random opinions.
I'd say your opinion is the random one .
listening to you one would think you are muhammad who came with islam