How much long term damage do you think the lockdown policies will have on children?

Author: TheMorningsStar ,

Posts

Total: 21
TheMorningsStar
TheMorningsStar's avatar
Debates: 0
Posts: 366
2
3
7
TheMorningsStar's avatar
TheMorningsStar
2
3
7
I am talking both from a physiological and a psychological perspective.
The lockdowns drastically decreased social exposure with children, and masks also created a disconnect between face and voice, both very important for the psychological development of children.
The lockdowns, sanitization, etc. also will have drastically limited exposure to various microbes, and if the hygiene hypothesis is true that such exposure during adolescence is key to developing a proper immune system, then children could very well be at increased risk in the future.

So, how much damage do you think has been done? Do you think that people went way too overboard with the lockdowns? Do you think that lockdowns, mask, and/or other policies should continue to exist?
zedvictor4
zedvictor4's avatar
Debates: 19
Posts: 7,665
3
3
4
zedvictor4's avatar
zedvictor4
3
3
4
--> @TheMorningsStar
Social exposure as in face-to-face interaction was already diminished by technology.

Put a group of young and not so young folk in a room and most would rather communicate with or via a machine than with those around them.

So how much "long-term damage"?

None.

Just inevitable change.
TheMorningsStar
TheMorningsStar's avatar
Debates: 0
Posts: 366
2
3
7
TheMorningsStar's avatar
TheMorningsStar
2
3
7
--> @zedvictor4
I do agree that technology was already diminishing healthy social interaction from a psychological POV, but I feel as if the Covid lockdowns dialed it up to 11. Also, what are your thoughts on the possible long term effects to the immune system via the hygiene hypothesis + lockdowns and over-sanitization?
Intelligence_06
Intelligence_06's avatar
Debates: 107
Posts: 3,077
4
8
11
Intelligence_06's avatar
Intelligence_06
4
8
11
The entirety of my account here was due to lockdown back in 2020. I just got bored and wanted more than the name-calling phase of DDO(which as expected has devolved into just exactly that). At the time, I was 14.

My life as well have benefitted from lockdowns. I don’t know if I am an outlier but I think deliberate periods one uses to isolate any “society” is a pretty neat idea, especially since socialization is more equal online than offline. Though if one gets isolated for too long, either they think it as a prison or they become like me, all brains and no muscles. I get left out (and denied applications to join sport teams) due to me being weak, in turn because I was not willing to exercise during lockdown.

I guess COVID literally catalyzed me into thinking about life and logic. It bound to happen but no one wanted me to stay at home all day typing a computer towards strangers on the internet, my parents included. They made me make friends and join sports programs involuntarily(which they eventually stopped) but the same ideas kept me a repulsion mentally. I guess the lockdown literally gave me a reason to not go outside and touch grass.

Then again, this was just my own record. I can assure you it is authentic. Even then, people hold their own opinions and I would like to hear how would people react if they are suddenly into lockdown, with predictions and possible preparations, if they were a kid at the time.
Shila
Shila's avatar
Debates: 0
Posts: 1,587
3
3
2
Shila's avatar
Shila
3
3
2
People serving life sentences in prisons actually do better living locked down than  they would have roaming freely in society. Children too do better staying at home than they would attending school and reading books that should have been banned. Eg black history of slavery. 

RationalMadman
RationalMadman's avatar
Debates: 426
Posts: 15,327
10
11
11
RationalMadman's avatar
RationalMadman
10
11
11
--> @Shila
Are you avery?
Shila
Shila's avatar
Debates: 0
Posts: 1,587
3
3
2
Shila's avatar
Shila
3
3
2
--> @Shila
RationalMadman: Are you avery?
The name says Shila.
oromagi
oromagi's avatar
Debates: 111
Posts: 7,831
8
10
11
oromagi's avatar
oromagi
8
10
11
--> @TheMorningsStar
So, how much damage do you think has been done?
To children?  Not much and almost all that harm is in the past now.

Do you think that people went way too overboard with the lockdowns?
No.

Do you think that lockdowns, mask, and/or other policies should continue to exist?
For COVID?  No.  I think we are past the point where COVID will overwhelm our medical system again.  Certainly, we should refine and be prepared to implement lockdown and/or masking strategies as appropriate for new disease outbreaks.
Shila
Shila's avatar
Debates: 0
Posts: 1,587
3
3
2
Shila's avatar
Shila
3
3
2
--> @oromagi
--> @TheMorningsStar
So, how much damage do you think has been done? 
To children?  Not much and almost all that harm is in the past now.

Do you think that people went way too overboard with the lockdowns? 
No.

Do you think that lockdowns, mask, and/or other policies should continue to exist?
For COVID?  No.  I think we are past the point where COVID will overwhelm our medical system again.  Certainly, we should refine and be prepared to implement lockdown and/or masking strategies as appropriate for new disease outbreaks.

With over a million Covid deaths and 95 million Covid cases. America should be well prepared to control its own virus spread.
TheMorningsStar
TheMorningsStar's avatar
Debates: 0
Posts: 366
2
3
7
TheMorningsStar's avatar
TheMorningsStar
2
3
7
--> @oromagi
To children?  Not much and almost all that harm is in the past now.
What are your thoughts on how it might have impacted the immune systems of people via the hygiene hypothesis? Young children were not exposed to nearly the number of microbes as is normal, and (if the hygiene hypothesis is accurate) this might mean an increase in health issues down the line (like allergies, autoimmune disorders, etc.).
oromagi
oromagi's avatar
Debates: 111
Posts: 7,831
8
10
11
oromagi's avatar
oromagi
8
10
11
The good hygiene portion of the hygiene hypothesis should be expected to have a greater impact than very young children staying at home which is most of what they do anyway.  Seems like the age group where the hygiene hypothesis comes into play is generally much younger than school age.  I suppose there were many children who would normally have gone to daycare for that year and gotten more exposure to diseases but children that young in daycare is also a relatively new phenomenon with unknown impacts.  I would guess the advantages of very young children spending more time with their families accrued more psychological survival advantages than immunological disadvantages.  I expect that if the most virulent generations of COVID had hit more children earlier, the long term impacts to some of those children would have far outweighed any  long-term immunological or psychological effects of quarantine.
Shila
Shila's avatar
Debates: 0
Posts: 1,587
3
3
2
Shila's avatar
Shila
3
3
2
--> @oromagi
The good hygiene portion of the hygiene hypothesis should be expected to have a greater impact than very young children staying at home which is most of what they do anyway.  Seems like the age group where the hygiene hypothesis comes into play is generally much younger than school age.  I suppose there were many children who would normally have gone to daycare for that year and gotten more exposure to diseases but children that young in daycare is also a relatively new phenomenon with unknown impacts.  I would guess the advantages of very young children spending more time with their families accrued more psychological survival advantages than immunological disadvantages.  I expect that if the most virulent generations of COVID had hit more children earlier, the long term impacts to some of those children would have far outweighed any  long-term immunological or psychological effects of quarantine.
The original solution proposed by Trump to deal with Covid was injecting disinfectants, somehow getting sunlight into our bodies, then injecting hydroxychloroquine and finally herd immunity.
Trump proposed more solutions for Covid than Biden. But it was Biden who get Covid under control.
Trump would have made a good VP for Biden.

Dr.Franklin
Dr.Franklin's avatar
Debates: 32
Posts: 10,265
4
7
11
Dr.Franklin's avatar
Dr.Franklin
4
7
11
You know what, if I'm being honest I loved online school
ADreamOfLiberty
ADreamOfLiberty's avatar
Debates: 0
Posts: 579
3
2
2
ADreamOfLiberty's avatar
ADreamOfLiberty
3
2
2
--> @Shila
The original solution proposed by Trump to deal with Covid was injecting disinfectants,
No the original solution he parroted was a lock-down "two weeks to slow the spread".


somehow getting sunlight into our bodies
Not an idea he came up with, those vaunted experts were the ones trying to run blood through UV dialysis. Laugh at them if you want to laugh.


and finally herd immunity.
Which is by definition the only final solution.


Trump proposed more solutions for Covid than Biden. But it was Biden who get Covid under control.
The human immune system (thank you a billion years of evolution) got covid under control, there was some slight support from vaccines. The vaccines were made by vaccine specialists, not ancient politicians of questionable character and cognition.
Shila
Shila's avatar
Debates: 0
Posts: 1,587
3
3
2
Shila's avatar
Shila
3
3
2
--> @ADreamOfLiberty
--> @Shila
The original solution proposed by Trump to deal with Covid was injecting disinfectants,
No the original solution he parroted was a lock-down "two weeks to slow the spread".


somehow getting sunlight into our bodies
Not an idea he came up with, those vaunted experts were the ones trying to run blood through UV dialysis. Laugh at them if you want to laugh.


and finally herd immunity.
Which is by definition the only final solution.


Trump proposed more solutions for Covid than Biden. But it was Biden who got Covid under control.
The human immune system (thank you a billion years of evolution) got covid under control, there was some slight support from vaccines. The vaccines were made by vaccine specialists, not ancient politicians of questionable character and cognition.
6.5 million died from Covid worldwide. Over a million in America died form Covid.
In a billion years Covid was relatively unknown. How does the human immune system deal with the unknown?
ADreamOfLiberty
ADreamOfLiberty's avatar
Debates: 0
Posts: 579
3
2
2
ADreamOfLiberty's avatar
ADreamOfLiberty
3
2
2
--> @Shila
In a billion years Covid was relatively unknown. How does the human immune system deal with the unknown?
This is why people on your side trust "experts", you haven't a clue how things work nor it seems a clue how to begin to determine what makes sense and what doesn't.

It's essentially a system for extremely rapid mutation of potential binding sites. A great number of antibody types are released, the ones that work are targeted for further production.
Shila
Shila's avatar
Debates: 0
Posts: 1,587
3
3
2
Shila's avatar
Shila
3
3
2
--> @ADreamOfLiberty
--> @Shila
In a billion years Covid was relatively unknown. How does the human immune system deal with the unknown?
This is why people on your side trust "experts", you haven't a clue how things work nor it seems a clue how to begin to determine what makes sense and what doesn't.

It's essentially a system for extremely rapid mutation of potential binding sites. A great number of antibody types are released, the ones that work are targeted for further production.
It took WHO several months to identify the coronavirus. Americans believed it came from a bat in Wuhan. Others  that it came for a lab in Wuhan. The WHO found no evidence to support those American theories.
But the Covid epidemic was very active in America. Why such confusion?
ahiyah
ahiyah's avatar
Debates: 0
Posts: 15
0
0
2
ahiyah's avatar
ahiyah
0
0
2
--> @TheMorningsStar
Of course we went overboard with lockdowns, but the damage mostly relates to the economy. People can always move on and get over things. There is lasting damage to global economies and people's finances after the massive disruption lockdowns caused to our supply chains, though. 

P.S anyone who thinks that kids don't directly interact with each other much, doesn't know much about children because they *still* do. All of my cousins were meeting with their friends before, during and after the lockdowns. From what I remember, it was only from March to June in 2020 that people were reluctant to go out...most of my family members, friends and peers were desperate to resume some normality after those initial three months.

Also, to some extent parents have to take responsibility. I.e just because the government says your kids can't go out, it doesn't mean that you can't keep them busy in other ways.
Shila
Shila's avatar
Debates: 0
Posts: 1,587
3
3
2
Shila's avatar
Shila
3
3
2
--> @ahiyah
--> @TheMorningsStar
Of course we went overboard with lockdowns, but the damage mostly relates to the economy. People can always move on and get over things. There is lasting damage to global economies and people's finances after the massive disruption lockdowns caused to our supply chains, though. 

P.S anyone who thinks that kids don't directly interact with each other much, doesn't know much about children because they *still* do. All of my cousins were meeting with their friends before, during and after the lockdowns. From what I remember, it was only from March to June in 2020 that people were reluctant to go out...most of my family members, friends and peers were desperate to resume some normality after those initial three months.

Also, to some extent parents have to take responsibility. I.e just because the government says your kids can't go out, it doesn't mean that you can't keep them busy in other ways.
China successfully stopped Covid by introducing lockdowns. China now ranks 108 in the world in cases and deaths. Asian countries followed Chinas example and all have lower Covid cases and deaths.

ahiyah
ahiyah's avatar
Debates: 0
Posts: 15
0
0
2
ahiyah's avatar
ahiyah
0
0
2
--> @Shila
lol are you even real? 

You claim that Asian countries followed by example, but what Asian countries? India is in Asia, yet they have the second highest infection and mortality rates (after the U.S).

South Korea is ranked at #6. Even the U.K has less deaths from covid. Vietnam is #13, Taiwan is #22, North Korea is #28, and Hong Kong is #51.

https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/countries-where-coronavirus-has-spread/
Shila
Shila's avatar
Debates: 0
Posts: 1,587
3
3
2
Shila's avatar
Shila
3
3
2
--> @ahiyah
--> @Shila
lol are you even real? 

You claim that Asian countries followed by example, but what Asian countries? India is in Asia, yet they have the second highest infection and mortality rates (after the U.S).

South Korea is ranked at #6. Even the U.K has less deaths from covid. Vietnam is #13, Taiwan is #22, North Korea is #28, and Hong Kong is #51.

South Korea deaths = 28,000 , UK deaths = 190,000.
Vietnam deaths = 43,000
Taiwan deaths = 10,000
NKorea deaths
Hong Kong deaths = 9,900