Instigator / Con
21
1523
rating
5
debates
60.0%
won
Topic

Prefects should be elected rather than appointed

Status
Finished

All stages have been completed. The voting points distribution and the result are presented below.

Arguments points
9
0
Sources points
6
0
Spelling and grammar points
3
0
Conduct points
3
0

With 3 votes and 21 points ahead, the winner is ...

VonKlempter
Parameters
More details
Publication date
Last update date
Category
Education
Time for argument
Three days
Voting system
Open voting
Voting period
Two weeks
Point system
Four points
Rating mode
Rated
Characters per argument
10,000
Contender / Pro
0
1484
rating
1
debates
0.0%
won
Description
~ 197 / 5,000

[RULES]
1. Any concession will be considered as an immediate loss.
2. No vulgarities.
3. No new arguments in Round 3.
4. Rebuttals at the start of each argument.
5. Provide definitions in Round 1.

Round 1
Con
    Good day to you, Sir. I wish you good luck.

    For my definitions, please note that 'prefects' refers to a senior pupil who is authorised to enforce discipline. 'Elected' can be defined as a formal and organised choice by a vote of people in the same or higher rank, while 'appointed' means to assign a job or role to someone. Do note that the people affected by the implication of this motion is the teachers and students in a school.
   
    Now, I shall present my arguments concerning the social aspects in schools that are affected by this motion:

    Firstly, I think that if prefects are elected, bias cases can occur as everyone has a prejudice. Bias can appear in school in many forms, but today I shall concentrate on the matter of general bias. Let's take a look at an example which might happen in real life that cannot be avoided whatsoever: Student Y is running for a prefect; however, during his election only Student Y's friends, and mostly likely only his friends will vote for him as most probably, the others won't even care as they will only mind their own acquaintances. This happens when children are young, and during Student Z's election, all his friends will vote for him, even though Student Y might be more suitable to become a prefect. Now, take a look at another example of sabotage: the teacher might ask the class about who doesn't want Student X to become a prefect, and all his enemies will raise their hands no matter how suitable it is for Student X to become a prefect.

    Secondly, the choice of prefect votes can be influenced by popularity, but this case is not always ideal because regular students do not discriminate between leadership qualities and notoriety. For example, when I was in elementary school, the Science Representative for my class was "world-acclaimed" for shooting upward every five seconds to challenge the teacher in some annoying way or to crack exceptionally lame jokes. I still recall the uncountable times he had the privilege of lunch taken away from him because of the time he compared my Civics teacher's elbow to a stinking shallot. During his election run, my teacher succumbed to the overpowering chanting of my classmates. Yer, in seeking our vote, he would have to be a representative of the students and plan our class experiments. He would have to be both advocate and regulator, but he succeeded in being the only guy to fail his Science Exam and getting the entire class to stay back after dismissal one day because he didn't know how to answer a Science question.

    Thirdly, voters and candidates might not always understand or abide to the rules of the election. For example, the last presidential campaign in a country I shall not disclose troubled many citizens, according to the national news. Even candidates from the requisite backgrounds campaigned as though the elected president and the parliament was only the head and ministry of another government that could only institute alternative policies that did not affect them. Such candidates behaved as though they did not understand the constitutional limit to their role; or if they did, were unwilling to be constrained by them. The result of such wrong-headed thinking was a muddled campaign that confused many voters. Students running for prefects might go to such an extent as to forthrightly challenge the rules implemented by the teachers, which is inadmissible. 

    Thus, looking back on my speech, we can clearly see that an election indeed does more harm than good to all characters in this debate. I hope you take note of my good intention and thus, this motion should and must fall. Thank you sir, I give the floor to you. I shall not cite sources and will save you the burden of doing so.
Pro
Forfeited
Round 2
Con
I extend my argument to my nonexistent opponent.
Pro
Forfeited
Round 3
Con
I extend my argument.
Pro
Forfeited