Instigator / Pro
2
1500
rating
0
debates
0.0%
won
Topic

The macrophage is not important or essential to the human body

Status
Voting

Participant that receives the most points from the voters is declared a winner.

The voting will end in:

00
DD
:
00
HH
:
00
MM
:
00
SS
Parameters
More details
Publication date
Last update date
Category
Science
Time for argument
Two days
Voting system
Open voting
Voting period
One month
Point system
Four points
Rating mode
Rated
Characters per argument
10,000
Contender / Con
14
1662
rating
15
debates
90.0%
won
Description
~ 0 / 5,000

No information

Round 1
Pro
The macrophage may not be needed at all times because when waste enters the body, the macrophages job is to consume it. We would not need the macrophage since the red blood cells already clear out the waste in our body, don't forget, another way our waste leaves the body is feces. Yes I know macrophages both kill bacteria and consume our waste but we have other types of white blood cells and we would still live our life just fine! The memory B cell stores in data on how the white blood cells killed the certain virus/bacteria so we won't need to worry about not getting recovered quickly from illness.

The macrophage has two jobs, why am I opposing to this?
If you split the two jobs of a macrophage, you will realise that both jobs are taken by many other support cells and white blood cells, so having an extra cell just sitting around making sure you poop less is really pointless. But again I'm not saying " all humans should take surgery to remove their macrophages " because that's really a waste of time. I guess pooping less isn't that bad after all, and having more blood, but that doesn't make me change my mind on how humans can live without macrophages. The human body has everything they need, no need for an extra cell, it's not like it will save your life or anything. 

Con
Forfeited
Round 2
Pro
Forfeited
Con
Resolved: The macrophage is not important or essential to the human body

x. Default to con
  • Pro bears the burden of evidence in this debate. This is a debate predicated upon the human body and biological science. Pro has not referenced nor provided a single source in his round one argument, and thus, if I were to end the debate on this note I would still effectively claim victory as pro has not upheld his respective burden. 
  • Dismiss all claims asserted by pro as unsubstantiated.

Macrophages/Importance
  • First, pro makes subtle mentions of its function but does not take the step of defining macrophages they are "effector cells of the innate immune system that phagocytose bacteria and secrete both pro-inflammatory and antimicrobial mediators. In addition, macrophages play an important role in eliminating diseased and damaged cells through their programmed cell death."
  • Its importance is sufficiently revealed in a description of the cells alone. Macrophages are specialized cells, "involved in the detection, phagocytosis, and destruction of bacteria and other harmful organisms." They have a unique function that cannot be replicated by other cells in the body, contrary to the instigator's claims. 

The case of dysfunction
  • To refute all of pro's unsubstantiated notions (although they do not require a direct refutation as they are not credible claims), we can appeal to extensive biological research that demonstrates what happens when the macrophage fails to function. When the macrophage does not function, the effects on the human body are profound and evident. The argument is simple.
          • p1. If in the case where they do not function, there are severe and profound effects on the body, the function of macrophages is important and essential to the human body. 
          • p2. In the case where they do not function, there are severe and profound effects on the body.
          • c. Macrophages are important and essential to the human body. 
  • For instance: Nanomedicines for dysfunctional macrophage-associated diseases shows not only that "macrophages play vital functions in host inflammatory reaction, tissue repair, homeostasis and immunity," but additionally, "dysfunctional macrophages have significant pathophysiological impacts on diseases such as cancer, inflammatory diseases (rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease), metabolic diseases (atherosclerosis, diabetes and obesity) and major infections like human immunodeficiency virus."
  • Additional biological research shows "there is increasing evidence that even subtle genetic changes in macrophage function contribute to altered responses to both acute infections and in many major acquired disease processes such as autoimmunity, inflammatory diseases and cancer."
  • The conclusive case is that the macrophage is not only essential but vital to the well-being of the human body.

Conclusion
  • The decision seems simple to me. This is a biological debate. Only one person posted sources, and thus, one person made substantiated claims.

Sources
  1. http://www.bowdish.ca/
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/