Should organ donation be mandatory?

Author: Alec ,

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  • n8nrgmi
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    why not leave organ donation option, for the sake of freedom, but giving organs only to those that opt into donating them? that's what i've long proposed. people have said it's iinhumane, but i'd say it's only fair if there are a limited number of organs to go around. 

    plus it's rare but sometimes they take organs from someone who isn't completely dead or who might have a chance for revival. so i would still give the choice to donate here. 
  • Polytheist-Witch
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    Alex has serious issues with anyone having the freedom to do anything he wouldn't or thinks is the most moral choice. 
  • Alec
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    Giving organs only to those that opt to donate them is a good idea, but if you care about your own body, then you won't get the help you would need in some instances.  I would rather save lives then expose hypocrisy.

    plus it's rare but sometimes they take organs from someone who isn't completely dead or who might have a chance for revival.
    Only bodies that are declared dead by doctors are harvested for organs.  The odds of some person resurrecting from the dead is extremely low and does not compensate the amount of lives that get saved by the policy.
  • Mopac
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    After they harvest your organs, what do they do with the rest of the body?

  • Alec
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    Whatever would be useful.  Given that they don't treat your body pretty basically by pouring drying chemicals in it, your body won't be treated well either way.  Why not help society with it?
  • Mopac
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    Reliquaries and such.





  • Athias
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    --> @Alec
    I believe in freedom/small government on:

    -Guns
    -Homosexuality
    -Insurance
    -Religion
    -Military
    -Ideology
    -Possibly more things.
    These serve as the premise of bias not principle.

    Should organ donation be mandatory? No.
  • YeshuaRedeemed
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    You don't have the right to live off of someone elses body. I am a consenting organ donor, but if someone doesn't want to, they have the right to choose. Yes, I am supportive of safe, legal, and rare, as well.
  • estone523
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    I do not believe that organ donation should be mandatory. Am I a registered organ donor? Yes, because I want to be able to save lives while I'm alive and after I've died. However, I can guarantee that I'd be less open to the idea of organ donation if as soon as I turned 18 I was required to sign my name onto an organ donator registry. 

    America is the home of freedom for all. That freedom included the right to decide what to do with our bodies. The bill of rights gives us the freedom of religion, so people who do not donate their organs because of their religious beliefs (such as gypsies and native americans) should not be required to sign up for organ donation. The bill of rights also gives us the right to not have any part of our person seized under the 4th amendment; while it sounds crazy to some that the 4th amendment includes the seizure of bodily organs, I think it is a crucial law to help protect the American citizens from exactly what you are suggesting, which is essentially mandatory seizure of organs from a person after death. You forget that, while yes a person is pretty much defenseless after they die, they are still indeed an American and still protected under United States laws. 

    So no, I don't agree with mandatory organ donation. 
  • Alec
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    The bill of rights gives us the freedom of religion, so people who do not donate their organs because of their religious beliefs (such as gypsies and native americans) should not be required to sign up for organ donation. 
    Gypsies historically religiously assimilate to whatever religion is the majority.  In the even that they have a Gypsy religion they would want to follow (I wouldn't know what that is) I don't think their religion prohibits them from donating their organs.  Same with Native Americans.

    The bill of rights also gives us the right to not have any part of our person seized under the 4th amendment; while it sounds crazy to some that the 4th amendment includes the seizure of bodily organs, I think it is a crucial law to help protect the American citizens from exactly what you are suggesting, which is essentially mandatory seizure of organs from a person after death. 
    The 4th amendment makes an exception for probable cause.  The cause for removing one's organs could be death.  There could be a law that states that makes an exception to the 4th amendment for dead people.  I think they might make your body insecure when professionals pour toxic chemicals in your body to dry it out and to make it last longer., so when you die, either way your body is screwed.  The question is; do you reuse the body in order to be able to save someone else's life?  Since many people don't get access to life saving organs, this would help save more lives.  I would say life is more valuable then the rights of a dead person.
  • Outplayz
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    I haven't read this thread... but why do you think people don't want to save other people?
  • Alec
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    People are just scared of losing their organs when they're dead, as if they would resurrect or something.  But the odds of being resurrected from death are extremely slim.

    It's just a feeling people have, but facts don't care about your feelings.  I would rather save a life then provide a dead person with bodily autonomy.  Do you agree or not?  If you want to, you may explain why.
  • Outplayz
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    Let me tell you this... i will bet you my life i won't die until i die. But until then, i want to be immortal in this reality... whatever keeps me alive i'm all for. So... if i have to consume organs, then give em up. But... i wouldn't force anyone to give me their organs... bc ultimately, i'm not a afraid of death. If i don't get an organ and i die. Who cares? 

    I think this issue is stupid bc i'm not afraid to die. For those that are... they'll get greedy about it. For those that will gain income... they will get greedy about it. That's reality. We can't change that until people aren't afraid to die. Will that every happen? I don't think in our lifetime, but i could be wrong bc it's possible under certain circumstances.  
  • estone523
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    Gypsies historically religiously assimilate to whatever religion is the majority. In the event that they have a Gypsy religion they would want to follow (I wouldn't know what that is) I don't think their religion prohibits them from donating their organs. Same with Native Americans.
    While Gypsies do indeed assimilate to the most prominent religion in their country or region (in the United States I believe most Gypsies are Roman Catholic), that does not mean they do not all share similar beliefs unique to the Romani people. One of those beliefs is that in the afterlife, a person's spirit retraces its steps for one year, and so it is important for the physical body to be intact. [https://donatelifecalifornia.org/education/faqs/religious-views-on-organ-donation/

    As far as the Native American beliefs around organ donation, it is believed in Native American tribes that organ donation is a spiritual sacrifice as well as a physical one. This is because they believe that when a person passes, the person needs to have every part of their body with them. That belief is still very strongly held on to today, however it is shown that Native American donors have begun to slightly increase. [https://www.nativetimes.com/48-life/health/8351-view-of-organ-donation-shifting-in-native-culture]

    The 4th amendment makes an exception for probable cause.  The cause for removing one's organs could be death.  There could be a law that states that makes an exception to the 4th amendment for dead people. 
    So you recommend amending the 4th amendment to make organ donation mandatory? Probable cause is used when an officer of the law personally witnesses a crime. Are you saying choosing not to donate your organs should be on the same level as criminal activity? I would like some clarity on this. 

    I think they might make your body insecure when professionals pour toxic chemicals in your body to dry it out and to make it last longer., so when you die, either way your body is screwed.  The question is; do you reuse the body in order to be able to save someone else's life?  Since many people don't get access to life saving organs, this would help save more lives.  I would say life is more valuable then the rights of a dead person.
    Not everybody gets the 'toxic chemicals' in them to dry the body out; that's actually not what happens at all when a person is prepped for a traditional funeral and burial service. The morticians and coroner speak with the family if the person does not have a written will about how they want to be buried. In the cases of traumatic or sudden deaths, an autopsy is performed and, if necessary, a special person comes in to restore the body. When the person's body arrives at the funeral home, they automatically wash and disinfect the body for the safety of everyone in the vicinity. Most often, families only choose for the body to be embalmed when they want an open casket visitation or if they are moving the body to be buried out of state or for another option that would require the body to need to be chemically preserved. Embalming is not required for immediate burial ceremonies, direct cremations, or in states that don't require embalming for a closed casket burial when refrigeration is available. [https://www.funeralwise.com/learn/prep/] So no, you're body is not always "screwed". 

    A body should not be seen as some sort of recyclable object. That body used to be a breathing, living person. To deny that person, even if s/he is dead, their body should remain their body. Also, a lot of people actually get access to life-saving organs. Last year, over 35,000 (36,528 to be exact) people received a life-saving transplant--that's the highest number it's been in six years. While it doesn't seem like that's a lot of transplants, that's almost one-third of all the people on the transplant list every year! [https://www.organdonor.gov/statistics-stories/statistics.html]

    As far as your stance that life is more valuable than the rights of a dead person, I have to say I disagree with that opinion. I think life is priceless, no argument there, but if it was me personally, I know it would haunt me every single day if I had organs in me that were taken from someone against their will when they were at their most vulnerable, voiceless state. 
  • disgusted
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    if I had organs in me that were taken from someone against their will
    Dead people have no will.

  • estone523
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    Dead people have wills. They write them when they are alive. That’s why they’re called “living wills”.
  • disgusted
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    That the best you've got? Run away.
  • keithprosser
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    --> @Alec
    The UK will operate an opt-out system from next year.