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a steel-man argument is the practice of presenting the strongest possible version of an opponent's argument

even stronger than they may have presented it themselves, to engage in a more robust and fair debate

present your best arguments

and i will build you a fully customized steel-man
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Category:
Philosophy
30 5
once upon a time several families all lived in an old apartment building

this building had been built a long time ago and the families handed down their apartments to their children

a few of them sold their apartments to a group of newcomers

one day the landlord told everyone they were no longer going to manage the building and everyone would own the apartments they lived in and they would have to manage the building together

and to everyone's surprise

on the same day the old landlord left, several of the newcomers declared themselves the new owners of the building

the majority of the tenants were unhappy about this

but the new self-declared owners had stockpiled weapons and were "recognized" by a powerful neighbor as the official new owners

and rather predictably at that point

the legacy tenants tried to throw out the newcomers

a group of neighbors wrote an opinion about how the building should be split roughly in half

but the legacy tenants would not agree to give up half the building to the presumptuous newcomers who simply declared themselves the new owners of everything
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Category:
Politics
65 9
㊙️ THE STRONGEST ARGUMENT FOR ATHEISM (TSAFA)



there is no argument required to be unconvinced



are you perhaps unconvinced of the claim that bigfootspacealienslochnessmonster is real ? [presumably you are unconvinced]

do you feel compelled to fabricate an argument defending your (presumed) non-belief in bigfootspacealienslochnessmonster ? [presumably you are not compelled]


are you perhaps "not-an-astronaut" ? [presumably you are not]

are you perhaps "not-a-dinosaur" ? [presumably you are not]

are you perhaps "not-a-hippie" ? [presumably you are not]


do you feel compelled to fabricate an argument defending your lack of self-identifying as one of these labels ? [presumably you are not]



THE CLAIM IS: 
there is no argument required to be unconvinced

RHETORICAL QUESTIONS ARE EMPLOYED TO ILLUSTRATE THIS POINT

in other words

if you don't feel compelled to explain why you are "not-a-stamp-collector"

then you already understand why it is nonsensical to goad someone into explaining why they call themself an ATHEIST (simply, NOT-A-THEIST)

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Category:
Philosophy
49 7
the best possible case for the average american to cast their vote for joe biden

is to look at his record of accomplishments

not promises, because we all know that candidate promises mean absolutely nothing

(1) "the american rescue plan" - injected money into the economy

(2) "infrastructure investment and jobs act" - injected money into the economy

(3) "uyghur forced labor prevention act" - prevents some goods produced with slave labor from entering the united states

(5) biden directed the labor department to require all businesses with 100 or more employees to ensure their workers are either vaccinated or tested once a week

(6) biden halted funding for the border wall

(7) biden reversed the muslim travel ban

(IFF) you believe these are pro-toto good government policies (THEN) you should cast your vote for joe biden




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Category:
Politics
25 7
I take it the main question here is whether the PSR is true. Or, we can put this ontologically: what is it that would make the PSR true? Or epistemically: what it is that would warrant our knowledge that the PSR is true?

It is Kant, in The Critique of Pure Reason, who famously both makes these sorts of questions explicit and defends some influential reasons to doubt the PSR, or at least doubt the PSR in some relevant contexts.

In answering what I have just called the ontological and epistemic questions, Kant argues that what makes the PSR true/what warrants our knowledge of the PSR is its transcendental ideality. That is, on Kant's view, the PSR is a principle which necessarily governs any rational act of conceptualizing what one experiences, so that it serves as a norm of reasoning or as a basis for producing concepts about nature from our experiences. The positive result of this position is that we have a reason to think that the PSR holds in principle whenever any rational agent is cognizing their experiences, and so holds in principle as a norm or basis of scientific reasoning. The negative result of this position is that, because the PSR is grounded in the necessary conditions of reasoning about experience, it is being misapplied if it is taken as a basis or norm for things beyond our experience. This is to say that, while we can know that the PSR is a principle governing our cognition, we cannot know that it is a principle governing things-in-themselves, or nature as it is independent of our cognition of it. This prohibits its use in metaphysical arguments like the cosmological argument for God, where it is taken as the norm governing a causal series extending beyond our experience to a first cause which lies outside it.

So this sort of position is probably the most famous case of a mitigated skepticism regarding the PSR. But there are of course people who defend the PSR against this kind of criticism, as well as those who defend a broader skepticism regarding it. [[]]

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Category:
Philosophy
14 3
no claim is automatically logical

in order for a claim to be considered logical, it must be demonstrated and each component defined

for example

something plus something divided by something and then multiplied by the square-root of something = 42


you can't prove me wrong - so it must be true

if you don't believe me then you are just denying mathematical facts
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Category:
Philosophy
23 4
㊙️ 道可道 非常道

when you go head first and speak confidently of your movement, it is like the opposing wings of a bird, working in concert with, yet balancing the established durable standard description of proper movement

in other words

your description of your motive is not the same as the commonly accepted standard motive

in other words

your plan is unreliable

in other words

The Tao that can be spoken of is not the constant Tao
The name that can be named is not the constant name

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Category:
Philosophy
4 3
Do you ever feel like you're making meaningful choices in your life? Do you feel like you have the power to shape your own destiny? If so, you're not alone. Most people believe in the idea of free will, the notion that we are capable of making choices that are not predetermined by external factors.

However, upon closer inspection, the concept of free will is an obvious contradiction in terms. After all, if an event is truly "free" and not caused by any prior factors, then it is essentially a random event - and not a product of our own choices or agency. In other words, to be truly free, an event must be uncaused by anything else - and that is simply impossible.

This is where compatibilism comes in. Compatibilists argue that free will and determinism can coexist, and that our choices can still be meaningful even if they are ultimately determined by prior causes. However, this perspective is a bit of a smoke screen - it's essentially redefining free will in a way that almost nobody thinks of it.

For example, when most people talk about free will, they mean something like "the power to act untethered to fate." They're not thinking about internal mental processes or the influence of their environment on their decisions. By redefining free will in this way, compatibilists are essentially dodging the issue of determinism and the idea that events are pre-determined by prior causes.

To make matters worse, even magic and supernatural powers cannot solve this simple logic problem. The idea of causing an uncaused cause is inherently flawed and runs counter to the basic principles of logic itself.

So what's the takeaway from all this? At the end of the day, the concept of free will is an impossible and incoherent one. While it's certainly true that we feel like we're making decisions and acting on them, this feeling is a product of our internal mental processes and the influence of external factors - not a supernatural power to break causality.

In short, if you want to feel like you have free will, go ahead and do so. But just know that this feeling is not based on any coherent or logical perspective.
I hope you find this post entertaining and thought-provoking!
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Category:
Philosophy
34 8