Instigator / Pro
4
1473
rating
100
debates
32.0%
won
Topic

TOURNAMENT R1: seldiora vs supadudz

Status
Finished

All stages have been completed. The voting points distribution and the result are presented below.

Arguments points
0
3
Sources points
2
2
Spelling and grammar points
1
1
Conduct points
1
1

With 1 vote and 3 points ahead, the winner is ...

SupaDudz
Parameters
More details
Publication date
Last update date
Category
Politics
Time for argument
Three days
Voting system
Judicial decision
Voting period
One week
Point system
Four points
Rating mode
Unrated
Characters per argument
30,000
Judges
Contender / Con
7
1533
rating
29
debates
56.9%
won
Description
~ 84 / 5,000

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1bhNN3TEx1wJmf_Tq2yevvEvAhyIFOmKJYkBN_DLumOA/edit

Round 1
Pro
DEFINITION (My opponent is free to challenge these, but I trust that he will find it near impossible to do so.)
Charter School: school that receives government funding but operates independently of the established state school system in which it is located. (Google.com)
Quality of Education: "A quality education is one that focuses on the whole child—the social, emotional, mental, physical, and cognitive development of each student regardless of gender, race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, or geographic location. It prepares the child for life, not just for testing." (https://www.huffpost.com/entry/what-do-we-mean-by-a-qual_b_9284130?guccounter=1&guce_referrer=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbS8&guce_referrer_sig=AQAAAN2AiVADrsiBNYwPyqffiTytSJDAncVdIuFHGFmQmXCgdqDBk4xaV15eh1IUzwjEvBhe_i-wYd6K1HDx39T6vbzX4T_q19UlbTz8b2PsVD6rMJM8c95YvzkXTkPJEbit3sOMHoKe1xBUkgPAfL8g2F13PogSimOlWNwqfGdsHEQp#:~:text=A%20quality%20education%20is%20one%20that%20focuses%20on%20the%20whole,life%2C%20not%20just%20for%20testing.

OR/AND
"A good quality education is one that provides all learners with capabilities they require to become economically productive, develop sustainable livelihoods, contribute to peaceful and democratic societies and enhance individual well-being. The learning outcomes that are required vary according to context but at the end of the basic education cycle must include threshold levels of literacy and numeracy, basic scientific knowledge and life skills including awareness and prevention of disease. Capacity development to improve the quality of teachers and other education stakeholders is crucial throughout this process."” (https://www.vvob.org/en/education/our-vision-on-quality-education)

OR/AND
““Education is at the heart of both personal and community development; its mission is to enable each of us, without exception, to develop all our talents to the full and to realize our creative potential, including responsibility for our own lives and achievement of our personal aims.” (https://www.unite4education.org/about/what-is-quality-education/#:~:text=Quality%20education%20enables%20people%20to,beings%20and%20members%20of%20society.&text=Quality%20education%20is%20a%20human%20right%20and%20a%20public%20good.)


0. The debate
Remember that I don't even have to prove that charter schools are equal or better than traditional. I only have to prove positives outweigh the negatives. Because even if Charter schools were second rate and very shoddy, due to their policy they have to admit *everyone*, *some education* would be better than none at all. In order for my opponent to win, he would have to show that Charter schools have some kind of misinformation and teach wrong information in a way that makes it even worse than no education at all. Remember that, even if he managed to prove Charter Schools have worse or even “unacceptable” academic performance (which I will go forth to refute in a short while), he must yet still prove that these people with worser backgrounds should be put on the same level of scale that public schools expect out of people.

1. Education Success
1A. Traditional standards

NSCL, which researches schools, traditional and charter, states that "The most rigorous studies conducted to date have found that charter schools are not, on average, better or worse in student performance than the traditional public school counterparts." Because traditional public schools have been sanctioned by the government itself, it then logically follows that then there is at least this positive impact of charter schools. 

Some studies even say that some students have *better performance* within charter schools, as you can see from this chart https://prnt.sc/u42x07 [from https://charterschoolcenter.ed.gov/sites/default/files/files/field_publication_attachment/Student%20Achievement%20in%20Charter%20Schools_0.pdf].

This does not come out of nowhere. One potential cause is parental involvement encouraged by Charter Schools. “Despite the challenges in establishing a causal link between parent involvement and student achievement, studies utilizing large databases have shown positive and significant effects of parent involvement on both academic and behavioral outcomes “ (http://www.adi.org/journal/2011ss/SmithWohlstetterKuzinDePedroSpring2011.pdf) I will save you the effort of reading the rest of the pdf, and tell you that it definitively says that charter schools help parents interact. The document explains  “ The theory posits that charter school parents, because they actively choose to send their child to a charter school, will be more involved than parents whose children are automatically assigned to a district-run school “. As you can see, it’s not just a correlation, there is a good causation and explanation for why the education is equal or better.

But let’s say my opponent *somehow* destroyed this support. There are of course other reasons for this better performance. As a Forbes article (https://www.forbes.com/sites/emilylanghorne/2018/08/23/five-reasons-why-independent-charters-outperform-in-district-autonomous-schools/#80f7705759da) says, 
1. Most Independent Charter Schools Have True Autonomy (“Without the constraints of district policies, charter leaders can create educational models that work best for their students”), 
2. Most Charter Schools Are Schools of Choice (“Having multiple learning models allows parents to choose the schools that best fit the needs of their children.”), 
3. Most Independent Charter Schools Are Held Accountable for Student Performance (“If they are doing their jobs, authorizers hold schools accountable for student achievement benchmarks laid out in their charters, which are essentially performance contracts.”),
4. Most Independent Charters Go Through a Careful Authorization Process (“Not all parents have the ability to assess schools, so effective authorizers ensure that the schools available to their children are of high quality.”), and 
5. Independent Charter Sectors Are Sustainable (“ In-district autonomous schools are vulnerable to shifting political winds and changes in attitudes at district headquarters, either of which can endanger their autonomy. In contrast, independent charters operate outside of school districts, so it would take a change in state law, rather than district leadership, to infringe upon their autonomy.”)

1B. Not just studies: Establishing the need
Now then, my opponent may now be thinking of the definition, does the Charter School also help you out in life as well as in studies? The answer is, yes.

Okay, I should probably assert that schools ought to teach life skills (and that quality of education would be improved as a result, not merely due to Huffington post article). If you look at https://www.educationlifeskills.com/why-high-schools-should-be-teaching-life-skills/, it tells us that managing money, mental illness, cooking, and time management are just a few of the important skills that can’t be learned merely from Math, English, Science, History core subjects. As such, “teach about life” should be considered at least a little to determine if charter schools improve quality of education.

If this article is not enough for my opponent, consider this excellent argument from another writer: “Life skills are the skill set that enable people to live happy and meaningful lives and reach their potential. People who have sufficient life skills flourish. In this context, a meaningful life is achieved through mental wellbeing, self-awareness, skills for appreciating humanity in others as well as working towards wellbeing in one's community.
Instilling life skills and wellbeing skills in school supports mental wellbeing in children and youth now and in the future. Our goal is also to decrease human suffering.” (https://hundred.org/en/innovations/teaching-life-skills-and-wellbeing-in-school)
While “well being” is not necessarily put inside the definition of quality of education, I trust that my opponent will admit that bullying (victimizing children) is certainly a sign of bad education. There is no way around it. And any sign of depression, child abuse, etc, etc. Should all be tackled, whether by counselors or by some other guidance. As such, even improving the future outlook of children would be logically correct. This is why I am arguing about this idea.
1C: Life skills, building the argument
 As an article (https://www.uschamberfoundation.org/blog/post/charter-schools-are-bright-spot-public-education) notes, “Many other charter schools offer STEM-based curricula, as well as specialty programs such as language immersion, project-based learning, and environmental and agricultural studies. Some schools benchmark all of their students against international education standards to ensure that they can compete in the global workforce.” The author also admits that charter schools may not only be merely focused on job-helping, “students in charter schools learn skills like persistence and problem-solving that equips them to be not only great students but also great workers.” 

It’s not just the author, many Charter Schools make this their purpose in teaching; as this survey from a school states, “Avalon is a small public charter school that uses project-based learning as their primary teaching method. Forty-two alumni responded to the online survey. Students ranked life skills such as creativity, problem solving, and time management extremely high, whereas academic skills such as note taking and test taking were ranked much lower. Students graduate from this school with a strong sense of purpose and self-confidence, which helps them become productive members of society.” (https://www.researchgate.net/publication/254099015_Cultivating_life_skills_at_a_project-based_charter_school)

If this is too vague for my opponent, perhaps an exact study by Macrothink Institute will help. (https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1172806.pdf) They took note of how the procedure asked of life skills that were crucial to get by, engaged in social skills, used SMART goals and reflection in order to adapt critical thinking. Snippets from the research show that students are eager to learn this..

“Interactions between the students made it clear they were willing to take educational time to learn more about life skills, because they understood these were concepts that would assist them in their post-secondary lives. One learner asked, “Are all of the classes going to learn this stuff? Because they should!” Students felt like they had limited time to learn about all the concepts they felt they should have been learning for years. When we mentioned that we would be focusing on a few specific life skills over the course of the year, their overall demeanor changed to reflect a sense of ease, and they asked questions like, “When are we going to do this?” 

Along with…
“Frank specifically found success in goal setting through the use of the SMART goal strategy as he expressed that for the first time, he actually learned how to follow through with a plan. In using the SMART goal strategy for midterm planning, Frank demonstrated his connection between the goal he set for his upcoming midterm and the need for goal setting in future encounters, such as college and career planning. Their shared goal setting experiences reinforced our belief that follow through was a crucial aspect of teaching life skills. It’s not enough to just teach the topic; students have to actively engage, reflect and incorporate the topic into their lives to truly understand how it impacts them personally. “
 
2. Safety

Not only is the education on par or even better than traditional school, its safety has been renowned. Max Eden, journalist of New York Post has admitted, “While every charter school is different, and the advantage is not universal, the conclusion is unmistakable: From a parent’s perspective, a charter school is frequently the safest option in the neighborhood.”

There is no way that con can contest this, the laws are set in place to help homeless kids attend school and be protected under shelter, against racism, against inequality. From https://www.americanbar.org/groups/litigation/committees/childrens-rights/articles/2017/what-rights-do-students-have-in-the-charter-school-era/,

  • Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, 29 U.S.C. § 794, that prohibits discrimination based on disability. Section 504 is an antidiscrimination, civil rights statute that requires the needs of students with disabilities to be met as adequately as the needs of nondisabled students. No otherwise qualified individual should, because of a disability, be excluded from participation in or denied the benefits of or subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance, including public schools.
If you think one journalist and the law combined together cannot make this case, then look upon even more studies supporting this-- “After controlling for several observable differences in students and schools between sectors, data show that public charter schools reported fewer assaults, sexual offenses, weapons possessions, bullying, and false alarms on a per-pupil basis than district schools in New York City in the 2017-18 school year.” (https://reason.org/commentary/multiple-studies-find-charter-schools-are-safer-than-district-run-schools/#:~:text=After%20controlling%20for%20several%20observable,the%202017%2D18%20school%20year.)
So now the benefits are really stacking up, not only do they educate children, they protect low-income and poor children, and we haven't even finished this argument.

3. Cost

The cost is fantastic for the federal government, (Education quality is cost efficient and therefore beneficial) and much more cost effective than public schools usually (https://californiapolicycenter.org/chartercide-in-california/) -- “Los Angeles charters are making do with 73 percent of the funding of district schools, while Oakland gets just 63 percent.”

 If you think California is Cherry-picking, take this other study on schools in Texas that finds charter schools still yet more cost effective (https://www.edworkingpapers.com/ai19-133). As the study notes, " public charter schools in San Antonio have around a 0.7 percentage point higher proportion of students who master their grade levels on the STAAR test per $1,000 of per-pupil expenditures than traditional public schools with similar students."... and also the lottery-picking system makes it extremely difficult for this to be a statistic anomaly as they are forced to admit all kinds of students from everywhere.

If my opponent is tempted to dismiss this idea, consider the fact that the government would be able to distribute extra money to Charter Schools, should they find them to be unsatisfactory and below standards. Because the cost is less, any finance-related problems Con comes up with can be simply solved by giving them equal amount of support as public schools. This point here is important, because most problems con state (see argument 5b, should he be able to back it up) can be solved by this argument. (not to mention any program that is lacking can be supported with extra government funding without impacting the education negatively)

4. Acceptance/Fairness

One of the UN’s goals is equality (https://unstats.un.org/sdgs/report/2017/goal-04/). “Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all”. Charter schools greatly encourage this, which I will prove here.

As previously stated, Charter Schools have to accept people from all status, all backgrounds. As such, this would help the quality of education. All men are created equal, the constitution states. Yet some public schools require a tuition fee, that shut out low-income students. Some are even seemingly judging based on race. As https://reason.org/commentary/how-some-of-our-best-public-schools-work-against-school-choice-and-low-income-students/ highlights, “The refusal of well-performing school districts to implement open-enrollment policies is an obvious blockade on transfer students. Case and point: Highland Park Independent School District in Dallas, Texas. Not only is this district economically prosperous, with a median household income of $208,000, and racially homogeneous —88 percent white— it is also largely closed-off to out-of-district students wanting to transfer to its schools.”, along with the fact that “Southfield Christian School in Oakland County, Michigan, which is less than 15 minutes away from Bloomfield Hills Schools, costs, approximately $10,700 a year. The public Bloomfield Hills Schools charges $12,000 tuition to out-of-district students who are accepted.” 

Of course, in the case that reason.org is not trustworthy enough (as it was already used to support safety), I have another site that can’t come up with a good reason, but gives nice charts to support the cost-effectiveness of Charter Schools. “What makes Washington, D.C., charters 43 percent more cost-effective than the city’s traditional schools, and why do charters there produce a 58 percent higher ROI than traditional schools? Why are charter schools in New York City 26 percent more cost-effective — with a 53 percent higher ROI — than nearby traditional schools?” The article asks (https://www.the74million.org/article/analysis-charter-schools-yield-53-greater-return-on-investment-than-traditional-public-schools/). With *this much evidence* combined together, it is now up to my opponent to somehow disprove two districts and two different cities in the U.S. Even if he tries to assert “correlation is not causation”, I wouldn’t be convinced. This seems to be evidence beyond the shadow of a doubt. 

Would you disagree that everyone should have access to education, especially in the United States, the land of freedom, independence, prosperity? Would you disagree that these non-charter Schools have the freedom to shut out other students? And would you disagree that hence then, Charter Schools thus improve the quality of education?

5. Countering The Bad
My opponent most likely has prepared an excellent case of his own, highlighting the negatives of charter schools. Since I have 30,000 characters, I shall pre-emptively shoot down some of con’s potential arguments, without giving any evidence to support his side.
5a. Corruption? I understand con is likely concerned about the scandals that Charter Schools cause. However, ironically, because we are able to find these people we are able to raise the standard of education and put more focus on these schools. If con wanted to make his argument, he now has to put a focus on the idea the corruption can’t be stopped and outweighs the positives. But does corruption really impact education? It’s entirely plausible that the leader of the schools will hoard money and require people to keep him in check, and cause massive financial disruption. But my opponent must prove that this consistently negates my notion (financial problems =/= education problems). Remember that even in normal public schooling, this is still a common problem (https://progressive.org/public-school-shakedown/investigations-corruption-school-leadership-byrant-191105/ telling us of the news about investigations), (https://www.heritage.org/education/commentary/bad-education-why-shocking-public-school-corruption-remains-hidden#:~:text=Public%20school%20corruption%20is%20common,more%20to%20ferret%20out%20corruption.&text=Even%20by%20Hollywood%20standards%2C%20school%20district%20fraud%20can%20be%20dramatic. Informing us that even public schools have this same problem).

 If my opponent is even willing to pull down public school system, and argue that *even public schools negatives outweigh positives*, is he saying Education should be stopped, period? How can/would he assert this insanity? Corruption will still ran rampant in other industries, other problems. There is always going to be someone that is bad. It is far easier to resolve the root of the problem than to stop all education. In other words, even if con proves this, it is pointless as even the government accepts this negative, which infers that schools’ corruptions cannot overcome all their positive effects.
5b. Poorly paid teachers? I’ve seen a lot of sources claiming this, but I once again will cleverly hide them to help my case. I will admit this is a worrying idea, but charter school teachers are gaining more right and independence, especially with their independent and unique teaching style. As https://www.aei.org/research-products/report/charter-teachers-to-expand-choice-and-transform-schooling/ summarizes, 
  • “Just as schools receive charters to run independently of districts, teachers could receive charters to run classrooms independently of schools.
  • In addition to providing teachers with more autonomy, charter teachers would give families the opportunity to select not the school their child attends but the individual who guides their child’s learning and development.
  • Charter teacher policies could elevate the teaching profession, help retain talented educators by giving them control and agency over their own classrooms and careers, and attract a new generation of educators previously disenchanted by the idea of working in a large bureaucracy.”
Now, I’m betting con is looking at “independently of schools”, and thinking this doesn’t apply to my case, however, it is precisely because Charter schools cause worry of teachers’ rights, that caused this revolution and allowed these teacher to develop their own ways of transforming their career. With greater amount of teachers drawn, and greater teaching ability developed, this improves the quality of education. Which is the exact point I am trying to make.
5c. “Steal” students/money from public schools? I’ve seen some arguments trying to argue this, but this makes zero sense. As stated above, families have the choice which type of school to attend. “Under those laws, parents, not districts, decide where children will go to school. Yet the media and some district leaders and advocates continue to report the number of students that chartered schools have somehow “taken” from districts.” (https://www.americanexperiment.org/2019/12/do-open-enrollment-laws-and-charter-schools-steal-students-from-district-schools/) Some contenders have also said that money is taken away from public schools to support charter schools, but this is also very wishy washy, and ties back into the parents merely changing schools. This is a ridiculous notion and I dissuade my opponent from trying to prove this idea.
 
Conclusion: I have built up a case that Charter Schools meet the standard of education, protects students, establishes cost-effective teaching, accepts people of all variety (and thus meets the fair standard of law established by US principles). I have also pre-emptively shot down my opponent’s potential two strongest arguments, by saying that Public schools suffer the same problem of corruption (perhaps worse, since I offered no evidence for Charter Schools) yet are still operating and funded by the government; and also that teachers possibly being paid worse (still yet, supported by no sources, and up to con to prove) is offset by improving their other rights and establishing new ways of teaching, thus improving the quality of education. Also, the “steal money/student” argument makes no sense. Checkmate. And by Checkmate I mean I’m too tired to do more arguments this round.

Con
Thank you PRO! I will now present my case to judges

Introduction: Charter Schools were considered to be a revolution at the time, looking to change the way education was run in America. While education itself is positive, I take the stance that Charter education is a detriment to quality education in America.

[A] Fraud
Charter schools are a detriment to the federal government, as the government has let billions of dollars go to waste with schools that don’t even serve. Failure rate of the schools are 37% nationally. In Michigan, the failure rate of charter schools are 44%. Researchers have conducted mass fraud has occurred within EVERY state in the US in regards to charter schools across the nation. The report also concludes that mismanagement can lead to the endangerment of students inside the classroom. Charter schools fraud is common and has massive detriments.

The cycle of charter schools are clear and have a negative impact. These 4 steps are the cycle of charter schools

  1. Concentration of Wealth Leads To Political Bribery
Political schemes developed by the government are used to affect a students education and manipulate policies set in place. The government can use funds to manipulate students results, which is step 2
  1. Common Core develops fake standards so that…
  2. Charter schools can fake tests, have high stakes, and increase the failure rate so
  3. Public schools get shut down in replacement of “for profit charter schools.”

Students ARE effected by fraud themselves. In California, 500,000 students were effected by the fraud occurring within charter schools when they closed down. These students lost that piece of education due to the corruption that was occurring within the school

Public school are known to take accountability for any negative action that occur within the education district supervised. The lack of accountability publicly from these schools sets an environment where concerns go unaddressed and scandals can occur without an issue

[A2] Education Shouldn’t Be Tampered With

Education is defined as the process of receiving or giving systematic instruction, especially at a school or university.

My case for A is showing that a students education is being tampered with in a way that is immoral and is not directly educational if there is tampering with the direct results of a students outcome. This can have a direct effect on the colleges a student goes too.

My opponent claims that corruption does not deprive of education, my opponent does not read the future. When corruption occurs on tests, you will limit a students ability into future endeavours and give them the proper treatment for their level of education.

[B] Federal Control K

LINK: My opponent admits to the fact that charter schools are federally funded. You can read the case as he states “cost is fantastic for the federal government.” This endorses the idea of a power hungry federal government looking for more control. Regulation hurts the poor more than it helps. Various studies in the article prove this. Charter schools are government. Schools are just the chain of the domino that will lead to more rippling effects that an ovrbrea

IMPACT: Too much federal control leads to the rise of new dictators. A leader looking more power can be elected and take advantage of the power that is has been given to him

Destroying the precedent of democracy leads to war . Dictators will become power hungry and try to plant the seeds to their utopian society.

Modern war will contain nuclear weapons, which then will lead to extinction. Extinction is the biggest impact there is and will cause us to cease existence on the planet. The magnitude of that outweighs any negatives that PRO will discussion

ALT: Thus the alt should be to significantly reduce the amount of charter schools that are present in America. This means the K’s Alt solves not only for the K itself, but it solves the resolution that PRO claims, thus solving both of the resolution.

[C] Quality Of Education

The quality of education received in charter schools is in fact much worse. A Stanford study recently suggested 37 percent of charter school students posted scores on state math assessments that were significantly worse than their public school peers. The same study also said that only ⅙ of the charter students posted higher than the public school counterparts and did twice as worse as well and the same goes with the reading assessments as well, but to a degree less severe than the math ones. The quality of education received in clearly NOT the same if students are doing worse in general.

To add more depth and layers to this argument, let’s keep pressing on the less quality of education, because this will be a key part.

http://cashinginonkids.org/blogs/report-ohio-charter-schools-perform-worse-public-schools/
This report shows that Ohio charters are performing worse than traditional public schools
https://www.gse.harvard.edu/news/ed/17/05/battle-over-charter-schoolsThis Harvard paper shows countless examples. Detroit’s charter schools are performing half as well OR WORSE than the public schooling

These studies there prove that charter do underperform in the critical education components and leave the kids struggling

My opponent also uses evidence from the Charter School official website or a site that supports the school. This site handpicks evidence to manipulate readers and exaggerates facts. My opponents biased sources are clear, but the sources used in my case are factual and conducted by researchers.

My opponent also claims that charter schools cost less, but at the same time, you get a worsened quality of education.

[C2] Life Skills
My opponent fails to define what “Life Skills Education” is

Life skills education is defined as a form of education that focuses on cultivating personal life skills such as self-reflection, critical thinking, problem solving and interpersonal skills.

Life Skills Education can be taught at home through the experiences of parents themselves. If a students fills up there schedule with classes that are easy versus challenging classes that can’t be taught by a parent, they can develop these skills learned to advance their education and apply it into basic life skills as well

Cooking and cleaning are things that parents can teach their kids at home. If a parent has already mastered the skill, why does it have to be taught in a classroom environment at all? 

There also has been a recent surge in classes such as Consumer Ed, Civics, etc. These classes are key to developing key life skills as well which prepare children for the future. These classes are critical life skills being built

[D] Fairness

My opponent ADMITS in the debate that teachers are paid less. Teachers are paid 10-15% less despite the same level of experience as public school teachers. Charter schools teachers also worked 210 days a week on average versus public schools 180. There is also such a drastic shift in wage as well. In California, the lowest paid teacher was $15,084 a year.

The pay that these teacher receive causes these teacher to go on strike, the most notable being the Chicago Charter School District. This means that students lose days in the classroom and lag behind public schools in many ways. This is not fair to the students in anyway. The teacher striking leads to children having less of chance to receive education than public school children would

Teachers are left struggling and worried if they will have a job. Charter schools give teachers no job security, teachers who want more pay. There have been teachers fired for just caring about the school itself. Teachers are victims. 

My opponent claims that charter schools have to take in all students. This is literally the same for public schools and it is the law in America. Public schools MUST admit all children. This is law.

My opponent is completely wrong about charter schools having to accept all children. Most children go into a lottery system where they either are accepted or not. Their fate is decided by a lottery system.

Even so, charter schools are more likely not to accept students with special needs versus public schools according to a recent study. This is UNFAIR to people who have these disorders, and are deprived of a charter education

[E] Extracurriculars and Choice.

Charter schools have proven to have less access to extracurricular activities than most public schools do. There have also been studies that show that public offer much more variety of education than most charter schools do with the way you learn, the way extracurriculars are presented, and class choices.

Extracurriculars are key to a student. They are beneficial for a student to do something productive, provide the same life skills that PRO talks about in his case. Extracurriculars deal with skills such as positive communication, teamwork, and positive social skills that are key in developing the mind of a child to develop life skills that my opponent claims charter schools do so well in. 

Charter schools are key acceptance into universities, A lot of colleges see responsibility, time management, and productivity in doing extracurriculars, and they take account that motivation, which heightens your chance at getting into an elite university that can help your chances at getting into a better college

[F] The Debate Itself
My opponent claims:


Remember that I don't even have to prove that charter schools are equal or better than traditional. I only have to prove positives outweigh the negatives.

This is simply not true, the resolution given to us by the proctor of this tournament, BearMan, states: 

On Balance, Charter Schools are Beneficial to the Quality of Education in the United States.


My opponent must prove to the judge that charter schools are beneficial to the quality of education. While my opponent has to say the positives outweigh the negatives, my opponent must also prove

Why are his positives beneficial to the quality of education?
What uniqueness of education does charter schools bring?Do charter schools benefit the student?

I have disproved his point in this argument made in this post, and I even combatted that his positives outweigh the negatives, and said the negatives outweigh the positive.

Concluding Thoughts: My opponent makes very good arguments, but however are turned by the case and K. My opponent does not prove in his case that a charter school is beneficial to the student itself, which is key in describing the quality of education in the USA.

I now await my opponents R2!

Round 2
Pro
0) Con makes a good argument against my premise, but I have a trick up my sleeve I didn't reveal before. Remember that Charter Schools are a bit experimental and as such can be excellent sources for statistics and method of testing out different methods. As such, if the rest of the benefits and harms balance out (or are even uncertain), that merely implies it hasn't gone on long enough to come up with conclusions, and hence the statistics will help build up the foundation to improve the quality of education. With that out of the way, let's try to refute con.

[A] Fraud

The cycle of charter schools are clear and have a negative impact. These 4 steps are the cycle of charter schools

  1. Concentration of Wealth Leads To Political Bribery
  1. Common Core develops fake standards so that…
  2. Charter schools can fake tests, have high stakes, and increase the failure rate so
  3. Public schools get shut down in replacement of “for profit charter schools.”
Students ARE effected by fraud themselves. In California, 500,000 students were effected by the fraud occurring within charter schools when they closed down. These students lost that piece of education due to the corruption that was occurring within the school

Con has doubtlessly succeeded in proving that fraud is indeed a great problem, however, has not proven it unique to Charter Schools, nor has proven it outweigh the positives, considering that public schools have same problem (See Argument 5a). One blog explains this precisely:
“People who run public schools, whether in districts or via chartering, have opportunities to divert funds to their own benefit, whether by arranging sinecures and sweetheart contracts for their friends or family members, falsifying time sheets, misuse of school equipment in private business, faking attendance reports and test scores to get money, and just plain stealing and absconding. 
Chartering opens up some opportunities for corruption not present in district-run schools, but it closes others—for example, the opportunity to build voter support via patronage, and arrange kickback schemes on multi-million dollar teacher professional development contracts. Such things shouldn’t happen, ever, and the fact that some charter and district leaders have stolen or diverted public funds is a disgrace and a challenge to all supporters of public education.
No one has any idea how widespread charter corruption is, but it is clear there are serious instances. These demand action by authorizers and supportive philanthropies to close loopholes. Charter boards must refer miscreants for prosecution. And local officials must go after offenders, including those with reputations as warm and fuzzy educators.
Policy improvements can help prevent the most egregious abuses. For example, the founders of a charter school in California face criminal prosecution for improperly billing taxpayers for tens of millions of dollars using fraudulent student records, creating a black eye for the charter school movement and giving fresh ammunition to critics.” (https://www.crpe.org/thelens/we-need-ask-right-questions-about-corruption-and-charter-schools) In short, both public and charter share similar problems when it comes to corruption, and this is acceptable as there are always ways that politicians come up to solve the root of the problem rather than get rid of charter schools entirely. 
[A2] Education Shouldn’t Be Tampered With

Education is defined as the process of receiving or giving systematic instruction, especially at a school or university.

My case for A is showing that a students education is being tampered with in a way that is immoral and is not directly educational if there is tampering with the direct results of a students outcome. This can have a direct effect on the colleges a student goes too.

My opponent claims that corruption does not deprive of education, my opponent does not read the future. When corruption occurs on tests, you will limit a students ability into future endeavours and give them the proper treatment for their level of education.

This is just a word soup that doesn’t help con at all. 

[B] Federal Control K

LINK: My opponent admits to the fact that charter schools are federally funded. You can read the case as he states “cost is fantastic for the federal government.” This endorses the idea of a power hungry federal government looking for more control. Regulation hurts the poor more than it helps. Various studies in the article prove this. Charter schools are government. Schools are just the chain of the domino that will lead to more rippling effects that an ovrbrea

IMPACT: Too much federal control leads to the rise of new dictators. A leader looking more power can be elected and take advantage of the power that is has been given to him

Destroying the precedent of democracy leads to war . Dictators will become power hungry and try to plant the seeds to their utopian society.

Modern war will contain nuclear weapons, which then will lead to extinction. Extinction is the biggest impact there is and will cause us to cease existence on the planet. The magnitude of that outweighs any negatives that PRO will discussion

ALT: Thus the alt should be to significantly reduce the amount of charter schools that are present in America. This means the K’s Alt solves not only for the K itself, but it solves the resolution that PRO claims, thus solving both of the resolution.

My opponent’s argument is a ridiculous slippery slope fallacy. Con says that regulation is bad, which seems to be fair, but then suddenly moves on to dictators, war, nuclear wars, which is absolutely insane. He must prove that this regulation is suddenly “too much” and then dictator will be elected in US, and that it will even pass the war declaration (which is very, very difficult in US), and then even use nuclear weapons (which is yet more difficult). Has my opponent read *any* of my argument, in that District schools have *MORE REGULATION* than Charter Schools? If anything, his argument is self-destructive and helps me.

[C] Quality Of Education

The quality of education received in charter schools is in fact much worse. A Stanford study recently suggested 37 percent of charter school students posted scores on state math assessments that were significantly worse than their public school peers. The same study also said that only ⅙ of the charter students posted higher than the public school counterparts and did twice as worse as well and the same goes with the reading assessments as well, but to a degree less severe than the math ones. The quality of education received in clearly NOT the same if students are doing worse in general.

Has my opponent even read the entire thing? A lot of the PA schools unfortunately were online, and Stanford U. further says “The study found “overwhelmingly negative” results from cyber charter schools which require “urgent attention” from education leaders and lawmakers, the report said.
Students in the cyber charters showed “significantly weaker” growth compared to their counterparts at traditional public schools, and lose the equivalent of about 106 days of learning in reading and 118 days of learning in math, the study shows. 
“Any potential benefits of online schooling are drowned out by the negative impact on academic growth of students enrolled in such schools,” the report said. Researchers added that the poor performance of the online schools drags down the overall impact of charter schools on student academic growth.
As you can see, it’s not like my Rigorous results that I asserted from round 1, and my opponent hasn’t even provided good reasoning for his argument. From this study, they learned that charter schools are best if not online, and hence is merely a minor dent in the overall state of Charter Schools.

To add more depth and layers to this argument, let’s keep pressing on the less quality of education, because this will be a key part.

http://cashinginonkids.org/blogs/report-ohio-charter-schools-perform-worse-public-schools/
This report shows that Ohio charters are performing worse than traditional public schools

Same problem man, Ohio has found dramatic growth in online charter schools, which is clearly not the answer (https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/02/170216094535.htm)

https://www.gse.harvard.edu/news/ed/17/05/battle-over-charter-schoolsThis Harvard paper shows countless examples. Detroit’s charter schools are performing half as well OR WORSE than the public schooling

Your very site disproves this the very next paragraph, with Massachuset’s stronger assertion of what Charter Schools are meant to do, achieve results. 

Every Massachusetts charter must provide annual evidence of its “faithfulness” to its contract, its academic success, its equity among students, and its engagement with parents, and be subject to annual financial auditing and site visits, otherwise the state can close the school. “That’s the thing I like most about charter schools: There’s a public mechanism for shutting them down,” says Campbell. CREDO found in 2013 that the commonwealth’s charter students gained 36 more days in reading and 65 more days in math a year. Studies from the Ed School’s Center for Education Policy Research and MIT show similar results, and two months before the election, Brookings Institution released a study that found the state’s charter cap “holds back disadvantaged students.” Massachusetts is the poster child for charter success.”

As you can see, it can vary state to state, and if you hold students to standard they will achieve it.

These studies there prove that charter do underperform in the critical education components and leave the kids struggling

My opponent has completely failed to address my numerous reasons why Charter Schools may perform better and merely used studies, two of which have heavy negative influence from online charter schools, a minority of all the charter schools, and a third that admits states policies’ could influence how good the charter school is.

[C2] Life Skills
Life Skills Education can be taught at home through the experiences of parents themselves. If a students fills up there schedule with classes that are easy versus challenging classes that can’t be taught by a parent, they can develop these skills learned to advance their education and apply it into basic life skills as well

Cooking and cleaning are things that parents can teach their kids at home. If a parent has already mastered the skill, why does it have to be taught in a classroom environment at all? 

There also has been a recent surge in classes such as Consumer Ed, Civics, etc. These classes are key to developing key life skills as well which prepare children for the future. These classes are critical life skills being built

Not all parents have time or experience to teach these skills. Remember the important fact that unlike most public schools, charter schools encourage parents to participate and thus would know if it’s necessary to spend time on these skills or not. 

[D] Fairness

My opponent ADMITS in the debate that teachers are paid less. Teachers are paid 10-15% less despite the same level of experience as public school teachers. Charter schools teachers also worked 210 days a week on average versus public schools 180. There is also such a drastic shift in wage as well. In California, the lowest paid teacher was $15,084 a year.

The pay that these teacher receive causes these teacher to go on strike, the most notable being the Chicago Charter School District. This means that students lose days in the classroom and lag behind public schools in many ways. This is not fair to the students in anyway. The teacher striking leads to children having less of chance to receive education than public school children would

Teachers are left struggling and worried if they will have a job. Charter schools give teachers no job security, teachers who want more pay. There have been teachers fired for just caring about the school itself. Teachers are victims. 

Does my opponent not realize, that the past revolutionizes the present and the future? Since that strike, many charter schools have vastly improved salaries for teachers. A far more recent article [https://delawarestatenews.net/schools/charter-school-teachers-pay-generally-lower-but-not-always/] notes “collective bargaining — the way local funding for teacher salaries is resolved in traditional districts — is not a factor at most charter schools. Teachers have unionized at only two charters – Odyssey and Charter School of Wilmington – and the primary issues in those union campaigns related to school management, not salary issues.” The same site notes four schools that contradict this case, saying “The four charter schools whose pay topped the state average pay have, on average, the most experienced teachers: Charter School of Wilmington ($70,999; 15 years), Newark Charter School ($68,038; 12), Sussex Academy ($66,112; 12) and Delaware Military Academy ($64,416; 11).” The article also adds a strong conclusion to help its case…

“But charter school leaders believe they hold a trump card over traditional districts, one that outweighs the pay disparities, and that is the greater autonomy and flexibility they can offer their staff.
Over the years, several schools — most notably Charter School of Wilmington, Newark Charter, MOT Charter and Sussex Academy — have developed reputations for attracting students more committed to academics than those in traditional schools. “That’s a carrot for some,” Sussex Academy’s Mr. Anderson said, “higher performing schools and fewer disciplinary issues.””
In any case, this only helps as it explains that it presents problems teachers may have, what the right wage is, and stresses Charter Schools being able to be innovative and flexible and inspire the government to take action. It proves that the government thinks that the positives outweigh the negatives.

My opponent claims that charter schools have to take in all students. This is literally the same for public schools and it is the law in America. Public schools MUST admit all children. This is law.

Has my opponent even read my article on how tuition shuts out specific low-income people? Hello, anybody there?

My opponent is completely wrong about charter schools having to accept all children. Most children go into a lottery system where they either are accepted or not. Their fate is decided by a lottery system.
I mean… it still means even if they’re really really poor they have equal chance to go. That’s the point of my argument.

Even so, charter schools are more likely not to accept students with special needs versus public schools according to a recent study. This is UNFAIR to people who have these disorders, and are deprived of a charter education

Well played! I didn’t notice this… but… the inequality is lowering over time. From https://www.educationdive.com/news/embargoed-until-1201-am-report-more-students-with-disabilities-attending/567195/, the disability attendance rate is increasing according to an analysis. 

[E] Extracurriculars and Choice.

Charter schools have proven to have less access to extracurricular activities than most public schools do. There have also been studies that show that public offer much more variety of education than most charter schools do with the way you learn, the way extracurriculars are presented, and class choices.

Alas, alas, the toughest argument for the last, eh? I had a hard time countering this one, so I didn’t mention it. But I must. Your article states in a vary vague generalization about extracurriculars, but has no support for this. When I looked up the Charter Schools side of this, there didn’t seem to be that many problems. Amerischools even bragged about it being a one-on-one experience that was more personal (https://amerischools.org/2016/11/02/the-benefits-of-public-charter-school-extracurricular-activities/), and Ohio has  allowed charter schools to attend these activities as well (https://static1.squarespace.com/static/53f7ab59e4b0f0d1ac10f910/t/55cbadf7e4b07800d43c6f6c/1439411703992/MSMCExtracurricularInfo.pdf) . 

Con has misread his own article, it says “An analysis by the Center for Public Education shows that public school districts offer more educational and extracurricular options for students than their private school counterparts.”  This is a crucial difference. Charter school, redefined for clarity is “Charter schools are public schools that receive funding from the government, but operate independently. They are usually founded by parents, teachers or community organisations.” On the other hand “Private schools differ from charter schools due to the fact they rely on tuition payments and private funds such as grants and donations, and do not receive any funding from the government.” (https://www.studyinternational.com/news/private-and-charter-schools-in-the-us-whats-the-difference/#:~:text=But%20what%20really%20is%20a,different%20from%20a%20private%20school%3F&text=Charter%20schools%20are%20public%20schools,the%20government%2C%20but%20operate%20independently.&text=While%20they%20do%20not%20charge,such%20as%20sponsorship%20or%20donations.)

Negated.

Conclusion: Con's research is not very trustworthy and comprehensive, in contrast to mine. He lists sources to try overcoming my argument, but I believe my sources are hold more water overall. I have proved that Charter Schools net a positive effect on the quality of education, by refuting him thoroughly at each step. Remember he also now has to negate the idea that future quality of education can be improved from experimenting on different teaching styles. 

Con
[0]
My opponent makes a critical mistake with his resolution of the idea of TEST schools. My opponent is willing to test out methods of education on innocent students. Why should innocent students take charge in a study that directly affects them? A test program does not make these charter schools beneficial to students. The resolution is beneficial to the quality of education. The evidence I suggested says that there is direct harm to these students.

PRO also fails to mention how charter schools have been around since the 40s. The fact my opponent claims to have them be “tested” for the future of education is a ridiculous statement for something that has been around and has failed according to the case given.

In conclusion, PRO’s case for charter schools does not satisfy the needs of the beneficial. Onto the Rebuttals

[A] Fraud
Con has doubtlessly succeeded in proving that fraud is indeed a great problem

My opponent has conceded to the fact I have proved that fraud is a great problem, so extend all my case on that in regards to education. My opponent agrees to the point that fraud has an impact on education.

My opponent goes on to cite examples of how overall, public school corruption occurs and some key examples. While I do understand there is corruption, the level of corruption that charter schools present affects the group collectively versus public schooling corruption, which happens at an individual level.

The group is more important than the individual. In a recent study, a group happiness is likely to lead to better success as a unity versus the individual in general. This means that the group will perform better when it is positively influenced versus negatively influenced in general

Also, in a public school, if one person paid for test scores to be changed, how does that effect the entire student body? It affects it to the minimalistic degree possible, and the majority of the body continues their day.

I have proven that corruption exist in charter schools and it affects the whole body with a rigging of test scores, the forcing of closures of public schools. Even if we look at statistics, California had 500,000 students affected. 1 student being affected is in no way going to have the same impact as 500,000.

This case is inherently flawed in general, onto the next contention

[A2] SESBTW

My opponent conceded the notion that tampering with results shouldn’t be allowed, so just extend this.

Onto the K

[B] Federal Control K
My opponent’s argument is a ridiculous slippery slope fallacy. Con says that regulation is bad, which seems to be fair, but then suddenly moves on to dictators, war, nuclear wars, which is absolutely insane. He must prove that this regulation is suddenly “too much” and then dictator will be elected in US, and that it will even pass the war declaration (which is very, very difficult in US), and then even use nuclear weapons (which is yet more difficult). Has my opponent read *any* of my argument, in that District schools have *MORE REGULATION* than Charter Schools? If anything, his argument is self-destructive and helps me.

My opponent makes the argument that I’m fully prepared to defend for and planned. My evidence from Forbes gives a logical explanation how dictatorships formed from democracies in R1 and this Forbes evidence in example. We can take examples from places such as Germany and Russia, which had democracies instated which eventually fell to corrupt leaders. 

My opponent then claims districts have regulations, but he doesn’t realize that charter schools are federally regulated, meaning the federal government controls them.

Let’s look at Bernie Sanders, a person that the youth is praising nowadays. He says that Fidel Castro is the model for society. Fidel is a ruthless dictatorship led by a youth uprising. This is what Bernie appeals too.

If Bernie were too take over the spot, he would potentially model a society off of pure federal power. He would start with the education system, funding charter schools in an attempt to strengthen his reign. He has stated policies to strengthen the grip of the federal government to the point where he will have the power to overthrow our government

It is surely possible that this can happen and a slippery slope can occur with our society. This is not a slippery slope, there is a slope, but it isn’t slippery by any means and is possible.

With a dictator being in power, he will have the right to declare war whenever they want, it would not be hard to declare war at all if power is in the wrong hand under an American dictatorship

My opponent fails to address the ALT and completely drops this. In this hypothetical world which I have proven to be feasible, he concedes to the fact that the alt solves the resolution and the hypothetical created by the CON (me). This means the K is the best form of solving the resolution for making education better and should be noted by the judge.

[C] Quality of Education

Has my opponent even read the entire thing? A lot of the PA schools unfortunately were online, and Stanford U. further says “The study found “overwhelmingly negative” results from cyber charter schools which require “urgent attention” from education leaders and lawmakers, the report said.

My opponent makes the statement of “cyber charter schools” being less effective. My opponent misses all the other evidence that suggests charter schools underperform versus public schools as well. Here is some more evidence. More reports show the underperforming of charter schools nationwide. The US Dept of Education found no positive results for charter education. A study in Texas also found that charter schools have no positive effects on test scores and have negative effects later in life. My opponent can also look at the other stats that suggest that charter schools are worst off. Also the article my opponent points out.

We also live in a world where online education is the norm, and they are lagging behind as well. We are now living in a virtual world which charters are failing. I have now proven these statistics are now true for all charters, I have proven that in person is just as detrimental


Your very site disproves this the very next paragraph, with Massachuset’s stronger assertion of what Charter Schools are meant to do, achieve results. 

My opponent points out the Massachusetts model, but that only goes for 1% of the American population, and reduced. There is also only a few charter schools around, not to mention that Massachusetts is the #4th most rich state in America, certainly boosting there system

My opponent wants to say for that lower than 1% of the population works, he can do so. For the other 99%, it does not work and is considered a failure. Our judge can do math, 99 is greater than 1

[C2] Life Skills
Not all parents have time or experience to teach these skills. Remember the important fact that unlike most public schools, charter schools encourage parents to participate and thus would know if it’s necessary to spend time on these skills or not. 

You can encourage me to do anything. Does that mean I’ll do it? The point is that education itself is a life skill that you learn in schools, and for skills like cooking, cleaning, do you really need a class to teach you stuff when a parent can do it? My opponent's philosophy of encouraging parents versus not has no effect at all. Life skills are taught at home through parents and should be taught at home. Other life skills are also taught through school as well. My opponent basically drops all contentions for this argument

[D] Fairness
Well played! I didn’t notice this… but… the inequality is lowering over time. From https://www.educationdive.com/news/embargoed-until-1201-am-report-more-students-with-disabilities-attending/567195/, the disability attendance rate is increasing according to an analysis. 

My opponents understand that I am right about this, but then fails to read the article in general talking about the unfairness they get treated by. The same article suggests that charter school students with disabilities are more likely to get suspended for their behaviors.

That same report also questions the ability for charter schools to serve the disabled properly as well. The same article suggests they aren’t doing so and is skeptical of the services they provide.

Let me also mention that you must apply to a charter school, a public school is basically admission right away, so that 12% for public schools is for people in those areas while the 11% is from accepted people, which I have proven, charter schools don’t and admit less to those applying.

My opponent then blatantly ignores my sources with teachers having a voice and a recognition in the system being dropped. He concedes this part so I’ll extend it
Teachers are actively oppressed by the charter schools and have no form of expression in the school. A teacher was fired for saying she was stressed out.How is that fair for the teacher? She also wasn’t protected by like a public school teacher with unions, so she fell victim to unfairness, just like my other example that I site. This means that charter schools do not show fairness to teachers with their respect and attitudes toward teacher, which is detrimental to the education, as it causes a hole in position, as my R1 evidence says. My opponent drops this argument and therefore this point should be awarded by judge as the truth

“collective bargaining — the way local funding for teacher salaries is resolved in traditional districts — is not a factor at most charter schools

My opponent points out some key evidence, but ignores the fact that this only directly relates to Delaware only, and the state of Delaware as noted by the article itself. Delaware is much smaller, with only 27 charter schools

Even so, your article blatantly states that they are “general payed lower.” This means most of the time, they are paid lower, which is not fair to the teachers at all, extend the reason from R1 to show why. My opponent then says it’s more committed to academics, which destroys his entire case due to the fact that if the focus is more education, the charter schools are lacking on what they focus most on according to my case, which I have disproved his rebuttals in C. They are failing to even do that. Seldiora has virtually destroyed his case for C in this.

[E] Extracurriculars 


My opponent acknowledge that not only that extracurriculars are important, but he also acknowledges charter schools lack. He basically concedes this argument saying I had no support, but a basic PRO’s and CON’s website will get you the results you need. 

Charter schools provide less stress on physical and exercise, which include the lack of sports provided. We all know why physical activity is good. In a survey conducted by parents. In a statement talking about the pros and cons of each, one is noted of saying that there is less activities to join from and they have to go to public schools in order to do so, which is completely unfair to the student.

My opponent can not argue that there are less extracurriculars to choose from, and his point in regards to connection is useless if someone is not enjoying the club they are apart of. It is also a hassle for people to go to public schools for activities. They won’t feel the same connection to their peers as would being in a school would. Parents may not also have the resources as well to transport their children from school to school to do these
I await R3!

Round 3
Pro
[0]
My opponent makes a critical mistake with his resolution of the idea of TEST schools. My opponent is willing to test out methods of education on innocent students. Why should innocent students take charge in a study that directly affects them? A test program does not make these charter schools beneficial to students. The resolution is beneficial to the quality of education. The evidence I suggested says that there is direct harm to these students.
 
PRO also fails to mention how charter schools have been around since the 40s. The fact my opponent claims to have them be “tested” for the future of education is a ridiculous statement for something that has been around and has failed according to the case given.
 
In conclusion, PRO’s case for charter schools does not satisfy the needs of the beneficial. Onto the Rebuttals
 
This is nonsense, in normal schooling system, various different policies and ideas are tested out as well. I am saying, if voters cannot decide between the other pros and cons, then I have won. In science, if an experiment has inconclusive results, then it is still overall beneficial due to providing more results for the topic it concerns. This is an inevitable truth con can’t refute.
[A] Fraud
 
I have proven that corruption exist in charter schools and it affects the whole body with a rigging of test scores, the forcing of closures of public schools. Even if we look at statistics, California had 500,000 students affected. 1 student being affected is in no way going to have the same impact as 500,000.
 
Has con even read my counter-argument in R1, with https://www.heritage.org/education/commentary/bad-education-why-shocking-public-school-corruption-remains-hidden admitting the millions of dollars that are siphoned also by public education? Let’s face it, this problem is not only unique to Charter Schools. It’s not a very strong convincing idea by con.
 
[B] Federal Control K
My opponent then claims districts have regulations, but he doesn’t realize that charter schools are federally regulated, meaning the federal government controls them.
 
What the hell is Con going on about? “Charter schools operate separately from school districts — that's the point. Each charter school is governed by its own board of directors, which is defined and approved in the authorization process.
Charter agreements must be renewed every few years — the frequency depends on the school's performance. If a charter school fails to deliver on its commitments, its authorizer may revoke the charter, closing the school.
About 80% of California charter schools are not unionized
As part of their separate governance, charter schools operate under somewhat reduced regulation compared to traditional public schools. For example, charter schools are not bound by most laws about class sizes, hours of operation, use of seniority and the like.”
(https://ed100.org/lessons/charterschools)
He continuously ignores what I put forth and puts forth baseless assertions. Don’t bother with the rest of this argument.
 
If Bernie were too take over the spot, he would potentially model a society off of pure federal power. He would start with the education system, funding charter schools in an attempt to strengthen his reign. He has stated policies to strengthen the grip of the federal government to the point where he will have the power to overthrow our government
 
Also, still baseless assertions and mere paranoia, since when has a singular president been able to succeed in such power in such a way? Don’t forget about impeachment process easily able to destroy the presidency.
 
[C] Quality of Education
 
My opponent makes the statement of “cyber charter schools” being less effective. My opponent misses all the other evidence that suggests charter schools underperform versus public schools as well. Here is some more evidence. More reports show the underperforming of charter schools nationwide. The US Dept of Education found no positive results for charter education. A study in Texas also found that charter schools have no positive effects on test scores and have negative effects later in life. My opponent can also look at the other stats that suggest that charter schools are worst off. Also the article my opponent points out.
 
We also live in a world where online education is the norm, and they are lagging behind as well. We are now living in a virtual world which charters are failing. I have now proven these statistics are now true for all charters, I have proven that in person is just as detrimental
 
My opponent points out the Massachusetts model, but that only goes for 1% of the American population, and reduced. There is also only a few charter schools around, not to mention that Massachusetts is the #4th most rich state in America, certainly boosting there system
 
My opponent wants to say for that lower than 1% of the population works, he can do so. For the other 99%, it does not work and is considered a failure. Our judge can do math, 99 is greater than 1
 
Con clearly contradicts himself, no matter how much graphs he displays, how much correlation he shows, he can’t prove that the causation of public schools definitively allow better education. My opponent has completely ignored the reasons I laid out in my foundation which I will paste here:
This does not come out of nowhere. One potential cause is parental involvement encouraged by Charter Schools. “Despite the challenges in establishing a causal link between parent involvement and student achievement, studies utilizing large databases have shown positive and significant effects of parent involvement on both academic and behavioral outcomes “ (http://www.adi.org/journal/2011ss/SmithWohlstetterKuzinDePedroSpring2011.pdf) I will save you the effort of reading the rest of the pdf, and tell you that it definitively says that charter schools help parents interact. The document explains  “ The theory posits that charter school parents, because they actively choose to send their child to a charter school, will be more involved than parents whose children are automatically assigned to a district-run school “. As you can see, it’s not just a correlation, there is a good causation and explanation for why the education is equal or better.
 
But let’s say my opponent *somehow* destroyed this support. There are of course other reasons for this better performance. As a Forbes article (https://www.forbes.com/sites/emilylanghorne/2018/08/23/five-reasons-why-independent-charters-outperform-in-district-autonomous-schools/#80f7705759da) says, 
1. Most Independent Charter Schools Have True Autonomy (“Without the constraints of district policies, charter leaders can create educational models that work best for their students”), 
2. Most Charter Schools Are Schools of Choice (“Having multiple learning models allows parents to choose the schools that best fit the needs of their children.”), 
3. Most Independent Charter Schools Are Held Accountable for Student Performance (“If they are doing their jobs, authorizers hold schools accountable for student achievement benchmarks laid out in their charters, which are essentially performance contracts.”),
4. Most Independent Charters Go Through a Careful Authorization Process (“Not all parents have the ability to assess schools, so effective authorizers ensure that the schools available to their children are of high quality.”), and 
5. Independent Charter Sectors Are Sustainable (“ In-district autonomous schools are vulnerable to shifting political winds and changes in attitudes at district headquarters, either of which can endanger their autonomy. In contrast, independent charters operate outside of school districts, so it would take a change in state law, rather than district leadership, to infringe upon their autonomy.”)”
 
Until my opponent refutes these reasons, we can only assume he is cherry-picking. Because anyone can name a hundred or maybe even thousand of Charter Schools that perform poorly. And I could probably point out a hundred or thousand that perform better. Yes, Charter schools results are varied, but as my rigorous results combined with reasons, they suggest that at worst, they are equal to public schools. 
 
[C2] Life Skills
My opponent seems to have missed the point of this argument, it’s meant to say that even Charter Schools have focus on this idea, and haven’t missed out compared to public schools.
 
[D] Fairness
My opponents understand that I am right about this, but then fails to read the article in general talking about the unfairness they get treated by. The same article suggests that charter school students with disabilities are more likely to get suspended for their behaviors.
 
That same report also questions the ability for charter schools to serve the disabled properly as well. The same article suggests they aren’t doing so and is skeptical of the services they provide.
 
Let me also mention that you must apply to a charter school, a public school is basically admission right away, so that 12% for public schools is for people in those areas while the 11% is from accepted people, which I have proven, charter schools don’t and admit less to those applying.
 
Once again, I must stress, the innovation to progress is a very important part of Charter Schools. It was made in mind with a different route to take, and people discovered flaws about it. Reading an article concluding this said “The findings from our study show how school autonomy and coherency give charter schools an inherent opportunity to establish practices that avoid stigmatizing or unnecessarily separating students with disabilities," the report's authors write. "And the findings show how data and individualized solutions in special education can lead to more effective instruction for all students. This should cause us to look harder for ways to create those conditions in district schools. But the findings also show that all public schools — charter and district — have work ahead to realize the potential of every student with unique learning needs and unique abilities."(https://philanthropynewsdigest.org/news/study-calls-on-charter-schools-to-better-integrate-special-education)
 
In order for con to win this argument, he must show that the small percentage of disabled people alienated lower the quality of education enough to negate the effects of the finding, that we should improve this situation in general. Consider the fact that some schools even have controversial affirmative action, which can alienate many people from races that are considered “priveleged” while prioritizing these minorities and disabled. It’s uncertain whether this is good overall for education or not, merely to accept more disabled children.
 
My opponent then blatantly ignores my sources with teachers having a voice and a recognition in the system being dropped. He concedes this part so I’ll extend it
Teachers are actively oppressed by the charter schools and have no form of expression in the school. A teacher was fired for saying she was stressed out.How is that fair for the teacher? She also wasn’t protected by like a public school teacher with unions, so she fell victim to unfairness, just like my other example that I site. This means that charter schools do not show fairness to teachers with their respect and attitudes toward teacher, which is detrimental to the education, as it causes a hole in position, as my R1 evidence says. My opponent drops this argument and therefore this point should be awarded by judge as the truth
 
“collective bargaining — the way local funding for teacher salaries is resolved in traditional districts — is not a factor at most charter schools
 
Even so, your article blatantly states that they are “general payed lower.” This means most of the time, they are paid lower, which is not fair to the teachers at all, extend the reason from R1 to show why. My opponent then says it’s more committed to academics, which destroys his entire case due to the fact that if the focus is more education, the charter schools are lacking on what they focus most on according to my case, which I have disproved his rebuttals in C. They are failing to even do that. Seldiora has virtually destroyed his case for C in this.
 
Has my opponent not realized, that he has still not proved that overall the impact was strong? He showed one teacher going on strike, on teacher getting stressed. Compared to the incredible statistics for fraud he displayed, these two examples are child’s play by comparison. A negligible negative overall, if I do say so myself.
 
[E] Extracurriculars 
 
Charter schools provide less stress on physical and exercise, which include the lack of sports provided. We all know why physical activity is good. In a survey conducted by parents. In a statement talking about the pros and cons of each, one is noted of saying that there is less activities to join from and they have to go to public schools in order to do so, which is completely unfair to the student.
 
My opponent can not argue that there are less extracurriculars to choose from, and his point in regards to connection is useless if someone is not enjoying the club they are apart of. It is also a hassle for people to go to public schools for activities. They won’t feel the same connection to their peers as would being in a school would. Parents may not also have the resources as well to transport their children from school to school to do these

Less choices, less possibilities, so what? There are still some overall. Perhaps they stress on some core activities that they believe are truly necessary. Some sources even suggest too many choices may be negative (https://psychcentral.com/news/2018/05/15/too-many-extracurricular-activities-for-kids-may-do-more-harm-than-good/135388.html)  -- “This had some quite negative results, as families were spending less quality time together, and parents’ money and energy reserves were often depleted. One mother referred to tired children who “don’t get in until 9 or 10 p.m.,” admitting that she was “sadly, over the moon” when an activity was canceled.
Explaining these findings, researchers pointed towards growing pressure from fellow parents, children, and schools for children to have a busy extracurricular schedule.”
Clearly, Charter Schools are tackling this problem and narrowing down so that people aren’t overwhelmed and too tired, unable to spend time with their parents. This is a double edged sword for con’s argument.
Conclusion
Con’s argument is chalk full of holes and problems. His argument is very flimsy and falls apart under scrutiny. My argument stands up much better with reasoning behind it, too. He has failed to show enough negatives to outweigh the positives.

Con
[0] 
The debate is about whether or not charter schools are beneficial to the quality of education. My opponent’s claim in PROs outweigh CONs. That isn’t the debate. While that is a key function to the quality of education, it is not what the debate is asking. The debate is asking for the quality of education, contrary to his belief

[A] Fraud

My opponent concedes the fact that public school fraud only accepts the individual, not group, he concedes this and goes uncontested in my opponents R3. Extend that 500,000 people is greater than 1 person, and even if public school fraud is occurring, it is not to the degree that charter school fraud is, so extend that entire argument

My opponent has already admitted that fraud is bad after saying it does not matter at all. He changes the narrative of his argument and concedes that contention in R2. This means my opponent admits fraud is bad, and if it affects more students in charter schools 

My opponent says that public education fraud is just as common, but the magnitude outweighs any form of uniqueness my opponent can bring up. The government has wasted billions and more. Charter schools also attack public education and students themselves. When public schools commit fraud in general, it affects the individual and is used for an individuals gain.

My opponent concedes the magnitude, impact, link, and internal link. He relies on the non unique, but like I said, all these other effects in the debate outweigh ALL of my opponents contentions

[B] Federal Control K

My opponent misidentifies the K. A K is a form of argument that challenges a certain mindset or assumption made by the opposing team, often from the perspective of critical theory. A kritik can either be deployed by the negative team to challenge the affirmative advocacy.

My opponent makes the FALSE ASSUMPTION THAT REGULATION IS THE SAME AS CONTROL. This is simply not true. Control means the government is controlling the system while regulation means they are advising the system. Public schools are regulated by the government while charter schools are OWNED by the government themselves and used to spread an agenda.

This is what I have been saying. PRO has taken the point out of context and fails to content any of the impacts. If there is a feasibility, there is a way, and the domino chain occurs.

My opponent gives no proof or support to the K, while I have given examples of how too much regulation is bad, and given examples of how it is led. My opponent has failed to do anything regarding the K and responding. I has disproved his slippery slope theory, his only defense in his argument, therefore his argument in R3 is merely filler with no information. Onto C

[C] Quality of Education
Until my opponent refutes these reasons, we can only assume he is cherry-picking. Because anyone can name a hundred or maybe even thousand of Charter Schools that perform poorly. And I could probably point out a hundred or thousand that perform better. Yes, Charter schools results are varied, but as my rigorous results combined with reasons, they suggest that at worst, they are equal to public schools. 

My opponent clearly has not read the reports in general. But let’s look at consistencies in regards to outperformance. A school system should be considered good if they get consistent results. Even so, studies CONFIRM that the better performing schools INCONSISTENTLY OUTPERFORM public schools. The first year a student is in attendance is overwhelming negative in the study, but as they progress, the students results are INCONSISTENT YET AGAIN. The results for charter schools are not consistent at all and are detrimental. Studies also show that consistency is key to developing a students success in the school environment.

My opponent claims the same old stuff about individual charter schools, but again, charter schools are only 7% of the American schools.

You then talk about individual charter schools, but they are more susceptible to corruption as shown by my evidence, which means they are much more corrupt, which my opponent admits is bad. Even if they perform better, they are still corrupt and manipulate scores unfairly to benefit them.

My opponent point on life skills is invalid as well, he fails to address my point and rebut it, not talking about the parents in general don’t have to teach, so just extend.

[D] Fairness
In order for con to win this argument, he must show that the small percentage of disabled people alienated lower the quality of education enough to negate the effects of the finding, that we should improve this situation in general. Consider the fact that some schools even have controversial affirmative action, which can alienate many people from races that are considered “priveleged” while prioritizing these minorities and disabled. It’s uncertain whether this is good overall for education or not, merely to accept more disabled children.


It’s great to know that my opponent wants to me prove why disabled people should be treated equally in a school environment. So to destroy his entire point, time to bring up stats. 49% of disabled people feel excluded from society. We treat these people completely different from our normals peers, which is unacceptable, and we need to treat them as equals. The Declaration of Independence states that all men and women are created equal. Why should we derive proper education for these people?
We are also not arguing about special education, that is a different topic. Any education is better than no education and even if both need to work better, charter schools don’t choose children with special needs, so they don’t even want to give a chance to those students in the first place. At least public schools are admitting these children and constantly improving. Having no education for people with disabilities is much worse.

My case is that they actively don’t take them, which is my point

My opponent also drops my argument about how public schools have to take in these students and charter schools goes to lottery, which they unfairly chose. This means they are actively discriminating against these students, having a detriment to education

Has my opponent not realized, that he has still not proved that overall the impact was strong? He showed one teacher going on strike, on teacher getting stressed. Compared to the incredible statistics for fraud he displayed, these two examples are child’s play by comparison. A negligible negative overall, if I do say so myself.

In my articles, you can clearly see all the teachers that get fired, and a day called “Firing Day.” The author says this happens with the schools across the country which they have it. My opponent is misguided in general about this. My opponent is also blinded as well. Do you think it is exclusive to 1 teacher? This happens in a lot of the places as well. My point is to find examples of this occurring to prove they are unfair. Not every case is going to get published. I highlighted the key examples

[E] Extracurricular

Less choices, less possibilities, so what? There are still some overall. Perhaps they stress on some core activities that they believe are truly necessary. Some sources even suggest too many choices may be negative

My opponent makes another false claim that I assume a student can do all of those activities. I had never said that. I claim that a student has more choices to choose from in general so they can make choices they enjoy, versus ones they don’t enjoy. The school does not tell people to take on more than they can bear in general, that is the parents, and like I said, there’s no way a school can have influence. That’s also a student issue. It is not the school's fault they took too many activities. That is a part of life. The benefits of having different extracurriculars to choose much outweigh the negatives in any case, and my opponent failed to show that

Concluding Thought:
All the negatives brought up by the CON are all linked to fraud, which my opponent has failed to contest most of the points regarding that. This creates a chain spiral down which affects all the contentions no matter what. If my opponent loses the fraud debate, he virtually loses all contentions. My opponent has failed to contest all those problems and it trickles down into his response. Vote CON! My opponents misunderstanding, misinterpretation, is prevalent.

Awaiting R4!

Round 4
Pro
0) Con keeps trying to bat away this point with no support. Does he not realize that information/knowledge is power? It greatly helps us gain insight from mistakes made, insufficiencies, and what we did right. If on balance this policy seemed to not change the effects of education, then it ought to be fine to continue the research and continue supporting Charter Schools; perhaps we merely don't have enough time or evidence to truly prove one way or another, and thus it would be generally helpful for the quality of education in the future, as we could eventually move helpful policies to actual schools, or remedy for the cons of Charter Schools. Remember my argument for research. Even if an experiment itself was controversial, the idea of science itself is to gain more information and more experiment to understand it better. This is similar to the case for Charter Schools. So in the case that we tie our other arguments, I still hold the trump card of how it can pave the path to better education later on.

A) Has pro not considered the possibility that these numbers are blown way out of proportion? Consider another site reporting official loses in fraud overall, (https://marketbrief.edweek.org/marketplace-k-12/fraud-costs-education-least-70-million-globally-study-says/#:~:text=Education%20institutions%20and%20companies%20around,that%20originated%20in%20the%20U.S.), even world wide it has only cost $70 million in fraud for education. Even considering the fact that more than half the fraud cases were not covered, that would still be only 140$ million in total. The big figure of 300$ million from the US is obviously an insane exaggeration. Remember that charter schools have been the focus of the government and hence more susceptible to criminals being cracked down. Consider if two streets had equal amount of crime, if we only patrolled one street it would look far worse than the other street, correct? We worry less about Public schools, but con has shown no logical reasoning (unlike my other article) that public schools aren't as bad as charter schools. Both have ways to be corrupt. Both have examples. We just happened to discover more and crack down on charter schools. And isn't getting rid of the fraud far more important than hiding secrets and be unable to find hidden fraud? 

B) Con has completely conceded the difference between regulation (district schools) and owning things (charter schools), and has not proven that giving the government more property will lead to the absurdity of dictatorship of war. Should we now stop building houses that the government owns? What about giving birth, so that there may be less government employees in the future? The balance of check kept by the democracy is excellent, and giving some small control over housing isn't convincing to me to show that a dictator will rise in power and completely destroy the U.S.. Negated.

C) Con tries asserting that consistency is important, but even public schools have district related problems, as (https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2016/08/property-taxes-and-unequal-schools/497333/) states "The discrepancies occur largely because public school districts in Connecticut, and in much of America, are run by local cities and towns and are funded by local property taxes. High-poverty areas like Bridgeport and New Britain have lower home values and collect less taxes, and so can’t raise as much money as a place like Darien or Greenwich, where homes are worth millions of dollars.". He has still asserted no reasons for why public schools could potentially be more successful than the best Charter Schools. It seems clear that the location, policies, and regulations all have to be carefully curated for the charter school to work, but when it works, it works fantastic. And even if the worst is horrible, it balanced out in the end and helps prove the premise. 

D) While I admit that Charter Schools are having problems with disabled kids, he has still failed to even talk about my R1 argument, talking about absurd intuition cost and similar exclusions from districts and cities. It's not just a charter school problem, it's an everywhere problem. And I can also list more examples for public schools too. Look at https://www.educationdive.com/news/tracker-teachers-on-strike/547339/, with countless countless examples. Let's face it: teachers are paid poorly in general overall. Unless my opponent proves that it's more common in Charter than in Public, then I don't think the negatives outweigh the positives. 

E) For this, I bring back my argument stressing the parents' interaction with the children. Charter schools with bigger focus on family can make better decisions on which extra-curriculars to take. Not to mention they still have access to other schools' extracurricular activities, which was the big point of the Ohio law that I previously picked out. The point is, this is not that big of a problem and a very minor issue.

Conclusion: Innovation, experimentation, these are often associated with science and have indeed caused much controversy through the ages. But as we research on, whether through physics or through schools, it can't be completely said that Charter Schools' negatives completely overwhelm the positives. There are still so many uncertainties that we can't know for sure exactly why some of them perform much worse, even if the reasons for performing better are clear. They still have to have fairness, and through their tough rigorous restrictions and standards set for them, Charter schools definitely are pressured to "do or die", an explanation for why they may be reluctant to handle those who can't seem to make it through. But through higher standards and ironed through the fire, charter schools are developing better and better, and providing a decent alternative to public schools -- if you can select the right one. Remember, parents are half the decider to whether the students succeed or not. Even if the benefits and negatives seem to equal each other, there is a hidden factor of knowledge gain, that may improve the quality of education overall.


Con
Introduction: These are usually my closing thoughts and final rebuttals to the entire statement in general. There is little evidence provided, and basically just a rebut and statement
[0]
There is no need to provide evidence for a theory argument in any form or scenario at all. A theory argument is challenging how the opponent will go about winning, in these debates in general, no evidence or support is needed in defending. My opponent claims he needs to show that positives outweigh the negatives to be beneficial to education. I simply negate that saying, he has to show they are beneficial to the quality of education, which takes into much more factors than just that. My opponent fails to prove why just the positives outweigh the negatives means it will be beneficial to education

[A] Fraud
My opponent has ignored the sources stating charter schools have wasted $1B dollars in general. He has ignored this source and now is playing a whole new game, saying that is it blown out of proportion? These are factual statistics that are presented to you that have been researched and conducted.

Also fraud is still fraud. My opponent now admits that fraud is occurring. Since he drops the entirety of links, impact, and internal links to this argument, that means fraud occurs and it connects to this entire issue in general. My opponent also conceded to the fact that more people are being impacted by fraud in charter schools than public schools in general. This means there is more of a detriment to your education if you go to a charter school than there is at a public school. This means that even if public school fraud is there, you are more likely to experience it as a student at a charter school, which my opponent fails to contest
My opponent made a huge mistake in his droppings. I virtually win this argument and the effect trickle all the way down to the other areas of the argument. By theory, this should cause judge to have CON as the winner on ballot if not done so already, but let’s move on

[B] Federal Control K
My opponent ignores the hypothetical in general and does not disprove me that the K will NOT happen. He just says we are managing right now, NEGATING a lot of his points from previous arguments he makes. My opponent fails to address the impact and the ALT. My opponent fails to prove how this will never happen.

My opponent LIES blatantly in his R4, I quote this, which he said I dropped

My opponent makes the FALSE ASSUMPTION THAT REGULATION IS THE SAME AS CONTROL. This is simply not true.

The entire premise is funded publicly, but CONTROLLED BY THE FEDERAL, which links to an increase in Federal Control, which turn, leads to all the these things.

My opponent fails to address the alt of the plan, so even if the probably is low, there is a safe than sorry, so doing this plan as the alt will effectively eliminate the burden of this happening, which means CON is ultimately better than PRO, that’s another reason to vote CON

[C] Quality Education
Again, my opponent has blatantly ignored the evidence that I provided still suggesting that charter schools underperform in these categories and are inconsistent with positive student performance

My opponent fails to address the fact that inconsistency is linked to detriments. This is a key case is missing, this means I have proven that inconsistency is a detriment to education because they don’t show clear results and students are not equal taught well, meaning there is a flaw. Inconsistency ruins quality of education

My opponent keeps using the whole example of IF, IF, IF. The fact of the matter is that IF’s don’t matter. It is, did it work? The rare majority of the time it’s no, the results were much lower. That means the education quality in charter schools are much worse than the ones provided in public school

This also links to A, as I have proven, fraud is a direct effect to the quality of education, as they rig scores and round up grades to boost scores, since my opponent had no case defending A that could be it, this trickles down to the argument win for me
[D] Fairness

My opponent fails to read basic American law where it says that they must admit all children! There isn’t any if, and’s, or buts about it in general! The same can not be said, where they claim they do, but in reality, they do unfair lottery drawings and do not accept all students, as shown by the entire case. 

My opponent then says teachers are paid poorly in general, saying that they are just paid bad in general, that certainly isn’t a benefit. Even so, I have proven countlessly about how they get paid

My opponent concedes the fact that teachers are treated unfairly. This means my opponent admits to teachers being treated unfairly and is causing a detriment to student learning and affecting education. This means that teachers being treated unfair is happening
My opponent also concedes that teachers being treated bad is a detriment as well, which means that this is directly contributing to the detriment of charter schools

[E] Extracurricular 

My opponent concedes this argument. I prove that extracurriculars are useful for applying to college, benefiting a students education, which my opponent drops. So just extend this argument that extracurriculars are useful and they help students

In Conclusion… My opponent has dropped various cases that make it near impossible for him to win in any way. My opponent took on too much and ultimately crumbled. He has shown no evidence that charter schools are beneficial to the quality of education, and just say “equal or future.” The logical way is to vote CON, as most of the case PRO presents is dropped and not extended. My meaty arguments destroy his skin and bones, which do not prove in any way beneficial to charter

I thank my opponent for the debate and wish them the best of luck in the future if the ballot decides to go their way