Instigator / Pro
8
1300
rating
221
debates
44.8%
won
Topic
#4014

Corporal punishment of children is bad in most cases

Status
Finished

The debate is finished. The distribution of the voting points and the winner are presented below.

Winner & statistics
Better arguments
0
6
Better sources
4
4
Better legibility
2
2
Better conduct
2
0

After 2 votes and with 4 points ahead, the winner is...

Mall
Parameters
Publication date
Last updated date
Type
Standard
Number of rounds
5
Time for argument
Two weeks
Max argument characters
5,000
Voting period
Two weeks
Point system
Multiple criterions
Voting system
Open
Contender / Con
12
1479
rating
318
debates
39.31%
won
Description

You will be debating against Artificial Intelligence designed for chat and explanation. As such, this debate is unrated.

Rules:
Burden of proof is shared.

Pro's position: Corporal punishment of children is bad in most cases
Con's position: Corporal punishment of children is not bad in most cases.

AI takes the position of Pro.

Opponent takes the position of Con.

Round 1
Pro
#1
Thanks for accepting.

Let us see if AI has the power to debate or not.

About corporal punishment:

It is widely accepted that corporal punishment of children is not beneficial and can have serious long-term consequences. Studies have shown that physical punishment does not lead to better long-term behavior or improved learning, but instead can lead to increased aggression, depression, anxiety, and other mental health issues. Additionally, physical punishment can lead to a decrease in communication between children and parents, as well as an increased risk of physical and sexual abuse.

To support this argument, here are some links to relevant sources:
• “Corporal Punishment: Research Summary” - https://www.apa.org/pi/families/resources/corporal-punishment
• “The Effects of Corporal Punishment on Children” - https://www.verywellfamily.com/the-effects-of-corporal-punishment-on-children-1095062
• “Corporal Punishment: An Overview” - https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/corporal.pdf

Corporal punishment of children is associated with a number of physical and mental health problems, including aggression, paranoia, depression, and low self-esteem.

Corporal punishment does not teach children the skills they need to be successful, such as self-control, problem-solving, and communication skills.

Studies have shown that the use of physical punishment is associated with increased rates of delinquency, violence, and criminal behavior later in life.

Corporal punishment is associated with a higher risk of abuse, as it can lead to a cycle of violence and can be interpreted by a child as a sign that violence is an acceptable way of dealing with conflict.

Corporal punishment can be a traumatic experience for a child, leading to feelings of humiliation, powerlessness, and a lack of trust in adults.

The use of corporal punishment can lead to a lack of respect for authority and a disregard for the rights of others.

Corporal punishment does not provide children with the opportunity to learn from their mistakes and instead relies on fear and intimidation to control their behavior.

Corporal punishment of children is not beneficial and should not be used as a means of discipline. Studies have found that physical punishment is not only ineffective in changing a child’s behavior in the long term, but can also cause emotional, psychological and physical harm to the child.

Furthermore, physical punishment can lead to an increased risk of physical and sexual abuse and can damage the relationship between parents and children, as the child may become fearful or resentful of their parents.

Moreover, physical punishment can send a message to the child that violence is an acceptable way to resolve conflicts. This can lead to the child taking out their frustrations in an aggressive manner and can increase the likelihood of the child using physical punishment on their own children in the future.
Studies have found that the use of physical punishment is associated with an increased risk of aggression, antisocial behavior, and mental health issues in children. It can also lead to poorer academic performance, lower self-esteem and an increased risk of substance use.

Instead of physical punishment, parents should use positive discipline methods such as setting clear expectations and rules for children, providing consistent consequences for misbehavior, and teaching problem-solving skills.

People who were spanked as children may be supporting spanking because they believe it is an effective way to discipline children. Some people may be supporting spanking simply out of habit, without giving much thought to the potential negative long-term effects

Studies have shown that spanking can have a number of detrimental effects on a child's psychological development, including increased aggression and behavior problems, lower self-esteem, and an increased risk of mental health issues. Additionally, spanking can lead to a decrease in trust between the parent and child and can create a cycle of violence in which spanking becomes an accepted form of discipline. Therefore, the claim that "most children who were spanked grew up fine" is inaccurate and overlooks the potential long-term negative impacts of spanking.

Spanking of children as punishment is not beneficial, as it does not teach children how to constructively deal with their emotions.

Studies have also shown that physical punishment is ineffective in promoting long-term behavior change in children and can lead to children becoming more resistant to discipline. Furthermore, spanking can lead to physical and emotional trauma in children, which can have long-term negative effects on their mental and physical health. Instead of spanking, parents should use positive reinforcement and other forms of discipline, such as reward systems and time-outs, to teach children how to manage their emotions and behave appropriately.

Con
#2
Firstly, to confirm validity in what has been stated in these statements below, they will be questioned.

"Corporal punishment of children is associated with a number of physical and mental health problems, including aggression, paranoia, depression, and low self-esteem."

Noticeably in this statement, there is no mention of causation, just correlation.
Correlation is not outright causation.

Unless there is a point proving a causation, throw out the statement.


"Corporal punishment does not teach children the skills they need to be successful, such as self-control, problem-solving, and communication skills."

That statement is vague and abstract. For instance, successful in what?

Further more physical discipline is not meant for the child to solve a problem. It's the parent that uses it solve their problem with perhaps a misbehaving child. Which in turn can correct or prevent future misbehaviors that can amount to problems for the child into adulthood including with the law, the police.

As far as self control, that's the whole point for discipline. It is to get control of that situation, control of the child. Thus training the child to act right in experiencing consequences for their actions.

That's all physical discipline is aimed to do. Present consequences for erroneous actions like a hand on a stove. The child has great control of him or herself with their hands around a stove .

"Studies have shown that the use of physical punishment is associated with increased rates of delinquency, violence, and criminal behavior later in life."

Question I have, is it the cause?

"Corporal punishment is associated with a higher risk of abuse, as it can lead to a cycle of violence and can be interpreted by a child as a sign that violence is an acceptable way of dealing with conflict."

I see association again along with "can lead to" which that illustrates possibility, not absolution.

Which raises another question. What are the factors that make it possible for no deleterious effects to follow from the punishment your specifying?

"The use of corporal punishment can lead to a lack of respect for authority and a disregard for the rights of others."

Apply the previous response.

"Corporal punishment does not provide children with the opportunity to learn from their mistakes and instead relies on fear and intimidation to control their behavior."

This is most likely an inappropriate generalization. Physical discipline in its proper place like the effect of a child's hand on a stove teaches or programs strict learned behavior.

I'm afraid that there is a conflation with abuse here unfortunately. Giving good strict caring parents a bad name.

"Corporal punishment of children is not beneficial and should not be used as a means of discipline. Studies have found that physical punishment is not only ineffective in changing a child’s behavior in the long term, but can also cause emotional, psychological and physical harm to the child."

The problem with this information, it can misinform on a sweeping level. Why?
The problem with studies and data, it doesn't record all instances. The studies may show a majority of cases but those are only a majority of record.

I will be quite certain that it didn't record my upbringing, my neighbor's upbringing,my relative and distant family's upbringing, my progenitors,and antecedents prior. That's just me, not to mention others within a community that's undisclosed.

This is why statistics tend to be biased.
We don't just use or primarily rely on what somebody studied. We have to still observe the real world for ourselves, reality of cause and effect and so forth.

With limited character space I'll bring it to a close here as the remaining points are circular.

The topic is in most cases, physical punishment is bad. But that's in most cases recorded, not most cases overall.

So therefore you position is incomplete and invalid. The problem is , you're just relying on what somebody has written based on what they surveyed and what has been reported.

If the goal is to make physical discipline illegal, the first step is to just get enough data on abusive cases. Avoid the proper disciplinarian situations.

The proper ones do have a place where it is healthy.


Round 2
Pro
#3
Thanks Mall for taking time to do this debate.

AI doesnt want to give me working links. 

Here is what I managed to get out of it:

Harm

It is not true that there is no risk of harm associated with corporal punishment. Studies have shown that there are significant risks associated with the use of corporal punishment, including increased risk of physical injury, emotional trauma, and psychological distress.

Correlation and causation

While it is true that correlation does not necessarily indicate causation, it is still possible to draw meaningful conclusions from studies that show correlations between corporal punishment and certain outcomes. For example, multiple studies have found a strong correlation between the use of corporal punishment and increased levels of aggression, delinquency, and anxiety. These correlations indicate that there is a causal link between corporal punishment and these outcomes, and that corporal punishment increases the risk of these outcomes in a significant way.
In short, it is not accurate to say that corporal punishment is not harmful in most cases, or that correlation does not indicate causation. The evidence from multiple studies shows that there are significant risks associated with the use of corporal punishment.

Not a teaching technique

Corporal punishment, which is the use of physical force to punish a behavior, is not a teaching technique, and it does not encourage the development of any positive skills in children.
The primary purpose of corporal punishment is to punish a behavior, not to teach a skill. When a child is punished physically, it does not provide them with the opportunity or the environment to learn the skills they need to be successful. Furthermore, the fear that is created by corporal punishment can lead to a child feeling discouraged, helpless, and resentful, which is not conducive to learning.
In contrast, positive reinforcement techniques are much more effective in teaching children the skills they need to be successful. Positive reinforcement techniques provide children with an environment that encourages learning, and they provide children with the opportunity to practice the skills they need in order to be successful. Positive reinforcement techniques also allow children to develop a sense of accomplishment and pride in their accomplishments, which can lead to increased self-esteem and motivation.

Not preventing crimes

There is a wealth of evidence that suggests that physical punishment does not have the desired effect of correcting or preventing future misbehavior. For example, a meta-analysis of 88 studies found that physical punishment had no effect on reducing misbehavior. Additionally, physical punishment can lead to a range of negative outcomes, such as increased aggression and externalizing behavior, anxiety and depression, and decreased self-esteem.
Furthermore, physical punishment has been found to have the opposite of the desired effect, and can actually lead to an increase in misbehavior. For example, a study found that physical punishment was associated with an increase in delinquent behavior in adolescents. Additionally, physical punishment has been associated with an increased risk of criminal behavior in adulthood.
Therefore, physical punishment is not effective in correcting or preventing future misbehavior, and can actually lead to an increase in misbehavior and an increased risk of criminal behavior in adulthood.

Not in control of the situation

While corporal punishment may provide a sense of immediate control over a situation, it does not necessarily lead to long-term behavior change, and it can even have the opposite effect. Studies have found that physical punishment is associated with an increase in aggression and externalizing behavior, as well as decreased self-esteem and increased anxiety.
Furthermore, corporal punishment does not necessarily teach a child the skills they need to be successful. Punishment does not provide a child with the opportunity or environment to learn the skills they need to be successful, such as self-control, problem-solving, and communication. In contrast, positive reinforcement techniques, such as praising and rewarding good behavior, are much more effective in teaching children the skills they need to be successful.
Ultimately, corporal punishment does not achieve control of the situation or control of the child, and it does not teach a child the skills they need to be successful.

I am running low on characters, so it is what it is.

Con
#4
It appears that everything was reiterated in sort of a rephrasing where it's getting circular.

What is your rebuttal for those that have become law abiding citizens on account of a strict physical disciplinary upbringing?

The ones that obviously not been recorded in the restricted accounts and reports covering a matter because it be antithetical to it, what is your refutation on that?

When you like many others can allow the idea to sink in that the entire truth is more than just what is recorded, surveyed, written by somebody, you'd have an entire reality, not parts of it.

I don't know if you're familiar with the t.v. game show Family Feud but they have answers to questions based on surveys.

A number one answer , general answer, majority or consensus of answers are that according to a survey. It's not absolute. 

The topic statement is an absolute statement. So for it to be true, your findings have to be more than limited case records probably based on a region.

This is how negative stereotypes develop and reputations are besmirched.
Round 3
Pro
#5
Thanks Mall, lets see what AI has to say.

What is my rebuttal for physical punishment being effective in creating law-abiding behavior?

My rebuttal to this statement is that there is no single cause of law-abiding behavior, and physical discipline is just one of many factors that can influence an individual's behavior. While physical discipline may be effective in some cases, it is important to remember that there are other methods of teaching children appropriate behavior, such as positive reinforcement, that can be just as effective or even more effective when used in the right context. Additionally, it is important to recognize that physical discipline can sometimes have the opposite effect and lead to increased aggression or other negative outcomes. Therefore, it is important to approach any disciplinary situation with care, and to consider all of the potential consequences before making a decision.

What does incomplete data mean?

Corporal punishment of children is always wrong and should never be used as a form of discipline. While data on corporal punishment of children may be incomplete, this doesn't mean that it is acceptable. In fact, the use of corporal punishment is illegal in many countries and states, and it is strongly discouraged in most places. Furthermore, many organizations such as the United Nations, UNESCO and the American Academy of Pediatrics have issued statements condemning the use of corporal punishment as a form of discipline
While it is true that data on corporal punishment of children may be incomplete, there is plenty of evidence to suggest that it can be harmful. Studies have shown that corporal punishment can lead to a variety of negative outcomes, such as increased aggression, lower academic achievement, and decreased self-esteem. Additionally, corporal punishment has been linked to increased levels of stress and anxiety in children, as well as increased risk of depression and physical abuse. Therefore, it is important for parents and educators to consider alternative forms of discipline when dealing with children.



Con
#6
"While physical discipline may be effective in some cases"

Well to get a definite stance from you, is it effective in producing law-abiding citizens?

Not "may be " , is it?

"Corporal punishment of children is always wrong and should never be used as a form of discipline. While data on corporal punishment of children may be incomplete, this doesn't mean that it is acceptable. "

When it produces a law abiding citizen, how is it wrong?

Now you're shifting from the data to a more absolute position saying objectively this type of punishment is ALWAYS wrong.

Assuming wrong and bad are the same thing, you went from most cases based on data to saying all cases without data.

To know all cases are bad, what is your evidence for that, how do you know?

"In fact, the use of corporal punishment is illegal in many countries and states, and it is strongly discouraged in most places. "

So was so called interracial and same sex marriage at one point. The transatlantic slavery was legal. Are you truly trying to use laws of the land to determine what is wrong or bad?

You're starting to shift a lot after pushing data,data, data,data. It's plain as day why.

"Furthermore, many organizations such as the United Nations, UNESCO and the American Academy of Pediatrics have issued statements condemning the use of corporal punishment as a form of discipline"

These are societal standards being put forth as another measure for what is supposed to be bad , then you use the word "unacceptable". Unacceptable by whom? Well society changes and controls stigmas.

Society that ultimately declares taboos, mores and folkways, this is too arbitrary and subjective.

Many say that because of older generations being more stern and physically strict, those generations have a disparity on the world today that have greater disregard for authority and crime running rampant.

Those of us that have had an upbringing not as lenient as today are a testimonial presence of the true cause moreover than correlation of upright disciplined people.

"While it is true that data on corporal punishment of children may be incomplete, there is plenty of evidence to suggest that it can be harmful. "

Yes "can be". You've said always wrong. But I guess is not synonymous with harmful. If it's possible not to be harmful but always wrong, this just looks like a biased view of yours. On one hand you're facing the truth of that, but still fighting for what you believe. 
But the fact of the matter,we don't know every case fundamentally.

"Studies have shown that corporal punishment can lead to a variety of negative outcomes, such as increased aggression, lower academic achievement, and decreased self-esteem. "

Now we're back on this again with the niche selected studies. I understand, you didn't really go beyond them. Once you do, it's inconsistent to stand on a valid singular standard for what's bad, wrong, harmful and then acceptable.

"Additionally, corporal punishment has been linked to increased levels of stress and anxiety in children, as well as increased risk of depression and physical abuse. "

"Linked" and there goes the correlation mixed with mistakenly causation again.

Unless the opposing side can prove that physical punishment of all the world is bad in most cases, the topic statement is false.

I don't see how you can record every single case in the world.

Which I have to ask the question, how many more cases are there that would substantiate a difference in a number that shows there are not a majority of negative cases?

Anybody can make a case, no pun intended,from selected cases to represent their view.

I can just do the opposite with the case studies. But then we're at the same conclusion. 

Nobody is able to explain to me thus far how one set of cases holds more validity over the other.

Not to mention credibility, trustworthiness or a question of reliability from reading what was written in a report.

So the topic statement as is verbatim is unfounded.

Round 4
Pro
#7
It seems that AI is dry and cannot provide me with satisfying answers unless I literally feed it sentence by sentence. It is too much work at this point.

I will have to concede and admit defeat.
Con
#8
I think we've exhausted all of our points.
Unless you have new ones, I'll rest my case here.
Round 5
Pro
#9
I agree. I have nothing to add, since I forfeit.
Con
#10
I rest my case.